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The Privacy Paradox

As technology advances, our private lives more and more enter the public domain, causing some to call for more laws protecting our personal lives. Others say privacy is not so easily defined and warn against restricting the free flow of information.  We’ll look at this debate, and several bills in the State Legislature tightening up privacy laws.

Guests

  • Buzz Scherr– Professor at UNH School of Law, principal investigator on a two–year NIH grant to study genetics, police investigation and Constitutional privacy, Chair and President of the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union
  • Neal Kurk – Republican Representative from Weare, member of House Finance Committee
  • Natasha Singer- a reporter at The New York Times since June 2005, currently for the Sunday Business section, where she covers the business of consumer data and writes a monthly column called Slipstream
Laura is well known in New Hampshire for her in-depth coverage of important issues and is widely regarded for her interviews with presidential hopefuls. Laura is a graduate of Keene High School in New Hampshire. Prior to hosting The Exchange, Laura worked in public radio in Washington, D.C. as a local reporter and announcer for WAMU and as a newscaster for NPR. Before her radio career, she was a researcher for USA Today's "Money" section, and a research assistant at the Institute for International Economics. Laura occasionally guest hosts national programs such as The Diane Rehm Show and Here and Now. In 2007 Laura was named New Hampshire Broadcaster of the Year by the New Hampshire Association of Broadcasters.
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