Telemedicine

Allison Quantz

Governor Sununu Monday signed a bill into law that could pave the way for an expansion of telemedicine in New Hampshire.

Telemedicine, the practice of connecting patients and doctors through video conferencing, is a booming trend in New Hampshire.

But one area where that's not the case has been for low-income patients on Medicaid. In 2018 less than 1% of all doctors’ visits for people on Medicaid happened via telemedicine.

Jason Moon / NHPR

Seeing a doctor by video conference is becoming more and more common. According to one estimate, in just five years more doctor’s visits will happen virtually than in person in the U.S.

In New Hampshire, this explosion of telemedicine is being heralded by some as a solution to health care problems like long wait times, rural access, and workforce shortages.

But questions remain whether telemedicine will be able to deliver.

DHMC

 

Southwestern Vermont Medical Center and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire are providing specialty care for children with heart or urinary conditions via telemedicine.

The centers use live, two-way, secure audio and video to connect providers at the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth with SVMC pediatrics patients in Bennington who have the need for cardiac or urology care.

Courtesy Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Lawmakers at the State House heard testimony on a bill Wednesday that would pave the way for an expansion of telemedicine in New Hampshire.

Senate bill 258 would add primary care physicians and pediatricians to the list of doctors in New Hampshire who can bill Medicaid and private insurers for telemedicine.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is preparing to launch a new telemedicine unit focused on intensive care.

Telemedicine, basically doctor’s visits by video conference, is a growing trend in healthcare -- and now Dartmouth-Hitchcock is hoping to use it to support intensive care units all over the region.

Instead of video-conferencing with a patient at home, intensive care specialists at Dartmouth-Hitchcock will connect with other doctors and nurses around the region to provide on-demand consultation.

Telemedicine in N.H.

Jul 17, 2018
Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

Telemedicine allows health care professionals to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients at a distance using telecommunications technology.  In N.H.,  consulting a doctor through a video-chat has the potential to lower costs and help the state deal with the opioid crisis and rural healthcare shortages. Virtual house calls are limited with problematic broadband access in the state, but rural hospitals are using it to access specialized providers. We learn more about the state of telemedicine.

Neurologists will be able to help treat potential stroke patients en route to the hospital through a new telemedicine system at New Hampshire's Catholic Medical Center.

The first 60 minutes after someone arrives at a hospital with stroke symptoms are a critical window for starting treatments that can limit the side effects and potential damage of a stroke.

The TeleStroke Ambulance Program allows ambulance crews to communicate with neurologists via a tablet to begin evaluating patients even before they get to the hospital.

Esther Vargas via Flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/h4rhH9

Showing up to work ill is an affliction -- it even plagues doctors. On today's show, we talk about why doctors don't take sick days. But soon, even going to the doctor may become part of the virtual reality lifestyle, as the use of telemedicine increases. Today, we also have an audio postcard from Madison, New Hampshire, from a weekend celebration of E.E. Cummings. Then, screeching fans, long bus rides -- sounds like a boy band on the road. Not exactly. We'll take a look behind the scenes of DigiTour, where stardom is measured not by number of records sold, but by number of followers on Instagram or Vine. And finally, we talk Statute Of Limitation laws to better understand the sexual assault cases against Bill Cosby. 

Intel Free Press via Flickr/CC - https://flic.kr/p/bA3eBS

A growing number of Americans are doing their jobs outside the usual confines of the office. And that includes doctors – the multi-billion dollar telemedicine industry is opening up new avenues for patients and for providers in New Hampshire.

Doctors Look To Phone Apps To Treat Mental Illness

Oct 30, 2013

Researchers at the Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center in Lebanon are developing mobile apps to assess and treat patients who have severe mental illness. These apps could help patients in crises and also help them manage their illnesses in the crucial time between visits to the doctor.