Racial Justice | New Hampshire Public Radio

Racial Justice

Demostrator holds sign that says Stop Asian Hate.
Cori Princell; NHPR

Violent attacks against Asian Americans have invigorated an examination of our nation's long history of racism against people from this wide, diverse group. In New Hampshire these conversations arose at Stop Asian Hate rallies earlier this month. We reflect on this current moment, and welcome Asian American Granite Staters to join the conversation.

Air Date: Tuesday, March 30, 2021.

A 14th juror was selected in former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's murder trial on Monday, one week before opening arguments are scheduled to begin on March 29. The court initially called for 12 jurors and at least two alternates; it could now add additional jurors to the panel in case anyone drops out.

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

New York Attorney General Letitia James says a grand jury voted that no charges will be filed against Rochester police officers in connection with the March 2020 death of Daniel Prude, a Black man who was in the midst of a mental health free fall during his encounter with the police.

Ronell Foster was riding his bicycle through the hushed streets of Vallejo, Calif., one evening when a police officer noticed that the bike had no lights and that he was weaving in and out of traffic.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

 Escrito por Annie Ropeik y Sarah Gibson. Traducción de María Aguirre 

 

Activistas de justicia racial de New Hampshire dicen que la respuesta policial a la manifestación pro-Trump que se dio en el Capitolio nacional el pasado miércoles 6 de enero demostró un claro contraste a su propia experiencia con la policía durante sus protestas. 

Los grupos dijeron que habían más policías presentes en las protestas pacíficas que se dieron en New Hampshire el verano pasado como respuesta a los fallecimientos de personas Afro-americanas en manos de la policía. 

From her couch in Minneapolis, Nuny Nichols watched a mob of largely white extremists stage an insurrection in Washington, D.C., set up a noose on a wooden beam outside the U.S. Capitol and walk a symbol of violence and slavery — the Confederate flag — through the building as they stormed and raided it.

She was angry, but she was not surprised at the way people in the mob laughed as they took things from the building. There were white extremists who felt at ease giving their names to media outlets and taking selfies with a white police officer.

Todd Bookman / NHPR file

Racial justice activists in New Hampshire say the police response to Wednesday's insurrection by a pro-Trump mob at the U.S. Capitol was a stark contrast to their own experience with law enforcement at protests.

They said they saw more police presence at New Hampshire's peaceful protests this past summer in response to police killings of Black people.

Lauren Chooljian | NHPR

As 2020 closes, we check in with past guests and Morning Edition host Rick Ganley, and hear from listeners, about what this year’s been like, and what you’ll take with you into 2020.

Air date: Monday, December 21, 2020. 

Manchester School District

por Sarah Gibson, traducción por Daniela Vidal Allee

El distrito escolar de Manchester ha publicado nuevos datos que muestran que los estudiantes de secundaria y bachillerato han tenido dificultades durante la pandemia, especialmente, los estudiantes de color. 

Un análisis de las calificaciones y asistencia del primer trimestre -- cuando la mayoría de los estudiantes tomaban clases remotas -- mostró que en comparación al año pasado, casi 10 por ciento más de los estudiantes perdieron o faltaron a clases este otoño. 

Courtesy of Manchester School District

The Manchester school district has released new data that shows middle and high school students are struggling during the pandemic, especially students of color.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

In June, young Black people organized some of the biggest gatherings for racial justice in New Hampshire’s history. Newly formed chapters of Black Lives Matter won praise from the state’s most powerful elected officials. 

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“We are with you,” Gov. Chris Sununu said at the time. “Let us be a tool and resource to be that agent of change.”

But in the weeks leading up to Tuesday’s election, politicians of all stripes appear to be paying less attention to the concerns of Black Lives Matter and their supporters.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

A Minneapolis judge has dismissed the third-degree murder charge against Derek Chauvin, one of the four former police officers facing criminal charges in the May killing of George Floyd.

Chauvin, who was captured on cellphone video kneeling on Floyd's neck for several minutes, still faces a higher charge of second-degree murder. Chauvin's legal team filed a motion to have both charges dropped, but the latter was denied.

What we don’t learn in school can matter as much as the lessons we do learn. In this fourth and final episode of a special radio series on “Racism In New England,” we talk to teachers and students about the harm of omitting stories and cultures from curricula — and how we can do better.

The exterior of the New Hampshire Department of Justice in Concord.
NHPR File Photo

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office says the use of non-deadly force in a highly publicized arrest of a Black man in the town of Albany earlier this year was justified.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

A court released some 15 hours of recorded grand jury proceedings in the Breonna Taylor case Friday – an extraordinary action that comes after a juror disputed Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's explanation for why no one was directly charged in Taylor's killing by Louisville police this spring.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Several hundred people gathered in Concord Friday evening in a peaceful protest to honor Breonna Taylor, the woman shot to death by police officers in her Louisville, Kentucky home last spring. The gathering on the steps of the New Hampshire Supreme Court, organized by local chapters of Black Lives Matter, was treated as both a call to action and a solemn vigil.  

The justice system failed Breonna Taylor, says Tamika Palmer, the mother of the emergency room technician whom police shot and killed in her own apartment in March. She says Kentucky's attorney general was not up to the job of achieving justice for Taylor.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The Seacoast chapter of Black Lives Matter has released a list of demands it says candidates running for office in this general election must deliver. Among them, legislation that would legalize cannabis and expunge convictions for some cannabis related infractions, outlaw qualified immunity for police officers, and mandate the collection of demographic data on a range of police interactions with the public for minor traffic stops to arrests.

For more on this, All Things Considered Host Peter Biello interviewed Clifton West Jr., one of the founders of Black Lives Matter Seacoast.

Updated at 2:53 p.m. ET

The city of Louisville, Ky., announced a $12 million settlement Tuesday in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of Breonna Taylor.

The settlement also includes a series of police reforms to be adopted by the Louisville Metro Police Department, including establishing a housing incentive program to encourage officers to live in low-income neighborhoods within the city.

Other changes to police tactics include creating a clearer command structure when executing warrants at multiple locations.

The mayor of Rochester, N.Y., is promising reforms to the city's police department after five nights of protests over the death of Daniel Prude after his arrest in March.

Thousands of people descended on Washington, D.C. yesterday for the March on Washigton demanding racial equality and criminal justice reform.

Here are some scenes as captured by photographers Dee Dwyer, André Chung and Tyrone Turner.

Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, mortality rates and life expectancy are far better for white Americans than they are for Black people during normal, non-pandemic years, according to an analysis published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Updated 6:39 p.m. ET

An Illinois teenager has been arrested in connection with a deadly shooting Tuesday in Kenosha, Wis., during the third consecutive night of protests following the police shooting of a Black resident.

Kyle Rittenhouse, a white male teenager, has been charged with first-degree intentional homicide and was taken into custody by police in Antioch, Ill., about 15 miles southwest of Kenosha.

Updated 6:30 p.m. ET

Jacob Blake, the Black man who was shot multiple times at close range by police in Kenosha, Wis., over the weekend, is currently paralyzed from the waist down, according to the family's attorney.

"Praying it's not permanent," civil rights lawyer Benjamin Crump tweeted Tuesday afternoon.

A national non-profit says legal representation for young people in New Hampshire is “gravely undervalued,” leading to inadequate access to attorneys and unnecessary rates of probation and court involvement.

NHPR File Photo

A statewide commission on police accountability and transparency says that all New Hampshire police agencies should start collecting data on demographics, including race, for arrests, citations and motor vehicle stops. They say that data should be shared with the public.

Photo: West Midlands Police/cc/flickr

Gov. Chris Sununu has granted a state commission on police accountability and transparency an extra 30 days to look into community relations and police misconduct. The commission, created in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, must deliver a full report with recommendations on police reform to the governor by the end of the month.

UNH Law

The faculty of the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law have voted to support the removal of ‘Franklin Pierce’ from the law school’s name.

This comes less than a month after UNH announced it would evaluate the name, in light of concerns raised by students about racism at the school and Franklin Pierce's ties to slavery.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Over the last month, New Hampshire has seen some of the largest demonstrations in recent memory, with hundreds protesting against police brutality and racial injustice. One of the major forces behind these is a group of Black Lives Matter activists in their early twenties, who’ve known each other for years.

NHPR’s Sarah Gibson caught up with them about what it’s been like to lead this movement.


Senate Republicans are unveiling their proposal on Wednesday to reform law enforcement in the United States in response to the national protest movement that followed the death of George Floyd.

Floyd, a Minneapolis man, was one of a number of black Americans who died at the hands of police in recent weeks and sparked a wave of demonstrations and debate about law enforcement and race.

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