Race | New Hampshire Public Radio

Race

Courtesy of Manchester School District

The Manchester school district has released new data that shows middle and high school students are struggling during the pandemic, especially students of color.

New Hampshire's state legislature is overwhemingly made up of older white men. This is also true for many local governments across the state.

A political action committee created this year is dedicated to increasing the diversity of New Hampshire's state and local governments. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Several hundred people gathered in Concord Friday evening in a peaceful protest to honor Breonna Taylor, the woman shot to death by police officers in her Louisville, Kentucky home last spring. The gathering on the steps of the New Hampshire Supreme Court, organized by local chapters of Black Lives Matter, was treated as both a call to action and a solemn vigil.  

The oppression of Black Americans has always been, to a certain extent, physical. Slavery, segregation and police violence represent just a few of the ways society has regulated Black bodies to maintain white dominance.

This weekend at the Black New England Conference, panelists will gather for a discussion on how women's resistance to this kind of oppression engages both body and spirit. Courtney Marshall, teacher at Phillips Exeter Academy, is one of the panelists and she spoke this week with NHPR's Peter Biello.

Black Americans are becoming infected with the coronavirus at a rate three times that of whites and they are twice as likely to die from COVID-19, according to a new report from the National Urban League, based partly on data from Johns Hopkins University.

A key focus of Thursday's report is the impact of the pandemic and how the disease has followed the contours of the larger society in falling especially hard on Blacks, Latinos and Indigenous people.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A group of Black, Latino and immigrant business owners and community advocates is calling on Gov. Chris Sununu and lawmakers to direct more COVID-19 relief money to minority communities.

This Friday’s Juneteenth celebration in Manchester will include art, music, poetry, and free COVID-19 testing.

Tia Parker, one of the event’s organizers, says they asked the city for a testing site because there are often barriers to COVID-19 testing in African American communities.

“So I want to make sure that this event also had something like that tied into it,” she says. “Just have a place where you can call the number, and there’s no cost to you, and you can come just get tested and have that accessibility.”

It's been five years since one of the most heinous racial killings in U.S. history when a white supremacist murdered nine worshippers at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. The massacre shocked the nation and prompted a racial dialogue in the city.

Those same issues resonate today amid the national outcry over recent incidents of police brutality.

Ethel Lee Lance, 70, was at Emanuel AME for Wednesday night Bible study on June 17, 2015 when a white stranger showed up, her daughter, Rev. Sharon Risher recounts.

George Floyd struggled desperately to make himself heard during his arrest. With a Minneapolis police officer's knee planted on his neck for more than 8 minutes, he pleaded for help, said he couldn't breathe — and finally, fell silent.

On Wednesday, more than three weeks after Floyd's killing, his brother raised a voice on his behalf in a message to international diplomats.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is on board with any of the NFL's 32 franchises signing former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

"If he wants to resume his career in the NFL, then it's obviously going to take a team to make that decision," Goodell said during an interview with ESPN.

"But I welcome that, support the club making that decision and encourage them to do that."

The Executive Council voted Wednesday to deny the nomination of Ryan Terrell to the State Board of Education.

Terrell’s nomination, by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, was voted down by the Democratic majority on the five-member body, who cited concerns about Terrell’s qualifications. But Terrell, who is black, said the debate “turned into a conversation about race” that discounted his other qualifications.

Design by Chelsea Connor and Sheridan Alford

Outside/In is a show about the natural world and how we use it – but access to nature is not equal.

Courtesy of Jean Ronald Saint Preux

 

Gov. Chris Sununu says the state is "looking into" an arrest last week that was streamed live and circulated widely on social media.

 

The video shows 34-year old Jean Ronald Saint Preux, an African American man, being arrested by two New Hampshire state troopers and pulled out of his car after allegedly resisting arrest.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Merrimack Valley High School’s former mascot - a depiction of a Native American man in a headdress - will be removed from some parts of the school but remain in others. The compromise came after hours of public comments and discussion at a school board meeting on Monday night.

The school replaced its Native American mascot with a lion fifteen years ago, responding to concerns that the image was hurtful and offensive.

Ali Oshinskie / NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office released a 25-page report Wednesday summarizing its investigation into a high-profile attack involving children in Claremont in 2017.

 

The report revolves around the events of August 28, 2017, when a group of 13 and 14 year olds were accused of tying a rope around an 8-year-old biracial boy's neck and pushing him off a picnic table, leading to serious injuries.

Britta Greene / NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has denied a request by the New Hampshire Attorney General's office to release records about its investigation into a high-profile alleged racially-motivated attack in Claremont two years ago.

Courtesy of the Manchester Equity Review Team.

 

The Manchester Equity Review Team, a group tasked with improving equity in the city's public schools, is recommending the district increase racial diversity among staff and change how it disciplines students.

In the last decade, Manchester has struggled with a decline in state aid and major demographic shifts; the percentage of Latino students, English language learners (ELL's) and students on free and reduced lunch in Manchester have nearly doubled.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Dover school officials say they won't heed renewed calls from regional NAACP leaders for a teacher at the center of a racist controversy to be fired.

Dover High School history teacher John Carver gave an assignment on the Reconstruction Era last fall that led students to sing a racist parody of Jingle Bells, including references to the KKK and murdering African-Americans.

Flickr/Irish Typepad

 

A report from the Juvenile Reform Project, a coalition of New Hampshire advocacy organizations, says that school discipline in New Hampshire is disproportionately harsh on students of color and students with disabilities.

 

The report draws on data from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights. (Scroll down to the end of this post to read the report in full.)

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Around 200 Seacoast-area residents met Wednesday night to talk about their community’s relationship to race and stereotypes.

The forum was part of the district’s response to a video that surfaced last month of Dover High School students singing racist lyrics to the tune of Jingle Bells as part of a class assignment. 

Transracial adoption, or adoption outside of one's own race or ethnic group, has continued to grow in the U.S. in the last fifity years. We talk with adoptees and a social worker about the adoptee experience, including living and growing up in a new culture, in a family of a different race, sometimes the other side of the world from their birthplace, and how families can engage in meaninful conversations about identity, culture, and race. 


Marlborough Police Department

When cops go online, sometimes they make jokes. 

New Hampshire State Flag
Wikimedia Commons

The non-profit New Hampshire Women's Foundation released its first demographics report Thursday on the status of women in the state.

 

On the surface, New Hampshire may look like its doing well when it comes to things like the rate of health insurance coverage, with more than 90 percent of adults having health insurance. But that's not the whole story, says Director of Policy at the foundation, Sarah Mattson Dustin.

 

Walter Beach Humphrey, mural, oil on canvas adhered to wall, 1938, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Commissioned by Trustees of Dartmouth College; P.939.19

Dartmouth College is moving a set of controversial murals painted in the 1930s to an off-campus storage facility.

The murals - depicting Native Americans as drunk, dumb and highly sexualized - are in a locked basement room of Dartmouth’s main dining hall.

The college formed a group to study what to do with them earlier this year after Native American students complained.

Now, President Phil Hanlon says the murals will be moved to an off-campus storage facility for the school’s Hood Art museum, where they can still be accessed for teaching and research purposes.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs says it is not satisfied with interpretive text meant to address a controversial mural at the Durham Post Office.

In a statement released Thursday, the group says the interpretive text is not an acceptable solution and that they don’t consider the matter closed.

James Napoli

New works in progress by black playwrights will be performed this weekend in the Upper Valley. The festival is sponsored by JAG productions, a relatively new black theater company that’s been drawing audiences across western New Hampshire and eastern Vermont.


NHPR File Photo

 

Governor Chris Sununu has announced the members of a new advisory council on diversity and inclusion.

 

The council includes representatives of state agencies, the university system, the ACLU, law enforcement, and others.

 

The group will be chaired by Rogers Johnson of the NAACP.

 

Sununu announced the creation of the council in December, following several high profile incidents of racial bias around the state.

 

The council's first meeting is scheduled for Feb. 8.

The full list of membership is below.

https://www.gofundme.com/helpquincyheal

A state law enforcement investigation into a high-profile, allegedly racially motivated attack in Claremont is now complete, state Attorney General Gordon MacDonald said Thursday. The close of the investigation marks a progression in the case, but few additional details are now public. 

In August, the mother of a young biracial boy said her son was attacked by local teens. She said the teens tied a rope around his neck and pushed him off a picnic table. He had to be airlifted to the hospital for treatment of his injuries.

There were 40 hate crimes reported in the state last year, the highest number of bias-related incidents since 2010.

The annual hate crimes statistics figures released by the FBI on Monday finds that fifteen of the hate crimes reported in the state last year were associated with race or ethnicity.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

A handful of Claremont residents demonstrated outside the city’s high school Thursday, holding anti-bullying posters and asking students to sign a pledge stating they won’t bully in the future.

The demonstration comes after a highly publicized incident earlier this fall in which a young boy was allegedly attacked by local teenagers. The boy’s family says he was left to hang by a rope and nearly died.

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