Native Americans | New Hampshire Public Radio

Native Americans

Reverend Don Ruggles, courtesy Chisasibi Heritage & Cultural Centre.

On July 6, a federal judge ordered the shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a victory for the resistance movement led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

But pull on the thread of this moment and you'll find it’s connected to a long and complicated history, of treaties made, kept, and violated, as well as the Supreme Court decisions that constitute so-called “native law."

Dartmouth professor Colin Calloway puts the Native American leaders that influenced George Washington in focus in his book, The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation. We discuss Washington's experiences with Native leaders, and how these relationships shaped his policy. 

Original air date: Tuesday, November, 26, 2019. 

For the most American holiday, steeped in tradition, a new book on "The Mayflower: The Families, The Voyage and The Founding of America."  British historian Rebecca Fraser focuses on Edward Winslow, who she calls the most important, but least remembered, of the group of separatists known as the Pilgrims.  We discuss the challenges they faced in England and in the New World, as well as the role of women and their changing relationship with the Native Americans.  

Walter Beach Humphrey, mural, oil on canvas adhered to wall, 1938, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Commissioned by Trustees of Dartmouth College; P.939.19

Founded in 1769 as an “Indian charity school,” Dartmouth didn’t quite fulfill its charter promise to “educate and instruct the Indian youth” in its early years. The college graduated only 19 Native people before 1973.

 

But the white men who were receiving Dartmouth educations in those 200 years held onto that story of the college’s founding, and they mythologized it - in class traditions, the college’s unofficial (and now defunct) Indian mascot, and in a piece of campus artwork the administration is now considering doing away with.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs says it is not satisfied with interpretive text meant to address a controversial mural at the Durham Post Office.

In a statement released Thursday, the group says the interpretive text is not an acceptable solution and that they don’t consider the matter closed.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Archaeologists with the New Hampshire Department of Historical Resources say recent discoveries at Livermore Falls may reveal the site has human history stretching back to before its industrial days.

 

"The Hollow" at Livermore Falls is known for its link to a 19th Century mill. But during fieldwork last summer, New Hampshire archeologist David Trubey says researchers found evidence of toolmaking and a possible fish-drying operation.  

 

NH.gov

 

A 19th-century mill community with possible Native American ties will be this year's site for the archaeology field school's summer program, run by New Hampshire's Division of Historical Resources.

The Livermore Falls or "the Hollow" was once the site of pulp mills, a tannery and a fish hatchery. It also included homes, a boarding house, stores and a schoolhouse. Recently, there is evidence to suggest that Native Americans may have once occupied the location.

David Trubey, a New Hampshire archaeologist, will direct fieldwork and instruction.

Town councilors in Durham are holding off on a new resolution to create a new town holiday honoring European explorers and Native Americans on the same day as Columbus Day.

Durham's town council was considering a proposal Monday to create "The Age of Exploration and Indigenous Peoples' Day" on the second Monday in October - effectively replacing Columbus Day. Town Council Chairperson Kitty Marple motioned to table discussion until the next meeting on Sept. 18, citing the late hour.

Jason Moon for NHPR

At the center of the weekend's turmoil in Charlottesville is a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. 

While New Hampshire isn't seeing much debate over old confederate monuments, at a post office in Durham, a 1950's-era mural is raising questions about race and another uncomfortable chapter from our nation's history.

Town Of Durham May Establish Indigenous Peoples' Day

Jul 24, 2017

On Wednesday morning, Durham’s three-person human rights commission will discuss establishing an Indigenous Peoples Day. Town administrator Todd Selig says the idea came about as the town grappled with pushback over a mural at the local post office.

Richard Boisvert

It’s not something you normally associate with New Hampshire. But for decades, archaeology has been quietly thriving here.

This summer, the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program—or SCRAP—will host a field school, in which volunteers can take up shovels and brushes to help uncover artifacts at two different dig sites. New Hampshire State Archaeologist Richard Boisvert will be directing field work this summer, and he spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about SCRAP.

1.03.17: Exploring Cahokia & Layla and Majnun

Jan 3, 2017
Dayna Bateman via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2hGD6G

Asked to imagine a "medieval city", you probably think of Europe or the Middle East - walled fiefdoms, bustling market stalls, maybe a castle, cathedral or dome of a mosque - not the American plains. Today, we'll learn about the Native American mega city that was bigger than contemporary London and Paris.

Plus: a boy. A girl. A forbidden love. The tragic storyline transcends time and place. The folktale of "Layla and Majnun" inspired the first Middle Eastern opera, the classic rock song "Layla", and now, a multi-media collaboration between the Silk Road Ensemble and choreographer Mark Morris - and now you can see it close to home. 

12.20.16: Prescription Pain Meds & The Seventh Fire

Dec 20, 2016
J. Stephen Conn via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/agvt1z

Since 2011, authorities have attempted to curb the growing opioid epidemic by monitoring prescribers, limiting doses, and cracking down on so-called pill mills. The goal is to limit access to addicts. But what do those restrictions mean for the estimated 25 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain?

Plus, The Seventh Fire - a documentary follows two men through the cycle of poverty, addiction, and crime on a northern Minnesota Indian reservation.  

Tom Wigley via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aWb3Uv

Poverty, suicide, and alcohol and drug abuse are disproportionately high among the two million Native Americans in the US - and at crisis levels on reservations. Today on the show, we'll look into one economic impediment: property rights.

And, women of the whites. A museum exhibit highlights how, from urban society, women took the lead in  developing access, accommodations and preservation of the paths and peaks of New Hampshire's White Mountains.

4.12.16: Jackson vs. Trump & Birds, Birds, Birds

Apr 12, 2016
PROscreenpunk via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4JiDy2

Imagine a political outsider who's thin on policy and big on celebrity.  He's crude. He draws enormous crowds, and his popularity has party leaders panicking.  I'm talking of course about presidential candidate Andrew Jackson. Today, we'll look at some parallels between the elections of 2016 and 1824.

Then, New Englanders are cautiously optimistic about the end of a mild winter - with one devoted group especially keen to see what the spring brings – birdwatchers. 

Andree Reno Sanborn / Flickr/CC

We’re sitting down with author Jay Atkinson to talk about his new book, ‘Massacre on the Merrimack’ - which takes on the Hannah Duston story.

This program was originally broadcast on 9/29/15.

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Ryan Lessard / NHPR

  Saturday marked the beginning of the annual intertribal powwow in Warner.

On the field next to the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, craft vendor tents, participants and visiting families surround a wide meeting circle at the field’s center. Lynn Clark is the Executive Director of the museum.

“It’s our 15th anniversary powwow. It’s one of the larger powwows in New Hampshire and it’s a very family oriented event and it’s a great social event—as you hear everybody reconnecting. There’s people that I sometimes see just once a year at the pow wow. It’s great fun.”

Hannah Duston Historic Site Will Keep Its Name For Now

Jan 14, 2014
Craig Michaud via Wikicommons

Republican state representative Gene Charron of Chester has withdrawn a bill that would have changed the name of the Hannah Duston State Historic Memorial Site in Boscawen to the Contoocook Island State Historic Site.

Sun Kissed: When Sunlight is Fatal

Oct 18, 2012
ww_whist via Flickr Creative Commons

Chances are you’ve never heard of the disease known as XP.  It’s a very rare, usually fatal genetic disease affecting one in one million children in the United States…a disproportionate number of Navajo people living on a reservation in the western United States suffer from the disease…which makes exposure to sunlight fatal.  Adi Lavi  along with Maya Stark, is co-producer and co-director of Sun Kissed, which follows a family on the Coyote Canyon Navajo Reservation, as they confront cultural taboos, t

Fish Blessed At Amoskeag

May 24, 2006