mental health | New Hampshire Public Radio

mental health

Courtesy of Eric Golnick

Veterans who need mental health services can turn to talk therapy, which often occurs in group settings run by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

When Eric Golnik left the Navy after eight years in the service, he was frustrated by how hard it was to find counseling that felt right for him as a gay veteran.

Today, the CEO and founder of VFR Healthcare, Golnick and his team are creating trauma resources for LGBTQ+ vets and first responders.

Pixabay

Children are facing not only the stress of remote learning and social isolation as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, but also a week of social unrest across the country. In the midst of all this uncertainty and loss, how are they handling the turmoil? We'll discuss childrens' mental health, how we can address their concerns and what the long-term impacts might be. 

Air date: Tuesday, June 2, 2020. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A judge sided with plaintiffs Thursday in a federal civil rights lawsuit brought by the ACLU-NH against the state of New Hampshire.

Oral arguments were heard today, via video conference, in a federal civil rights lawsuit. It alleges the state of New Hampshire is failing to provide due process to people who are involuntarily committed for psychiatric treatment.

The lawsuit, filed by the ACLU-NH, targets a practice known as emergency room boarding that occurs when psychiatric patients deemed to be a danger to themselves or others are forced to wait in hospital emergency departments because of a waitlist for beds at the state psychiatric hospital and other state-designated facilities.

Alex McOwen/NHPR

After seeing many of his peers at Dartmouth College struggle with their mental health during his freshman year, Sanat Mohapatra decided he had to do something about it.

That’s how Unmasked, a social media application focused on anonymous peer-to-peer support, was born.

Mohapatra, now a senior at Dartmouth, recently spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello to tell him more about his new app.

Gov. Chris Sununu is touting new progress in the state’s efforts to end the waitlist for patients to enter the state psychiatric hospital.

 

The state is seeking feedback from parents and community partners on its tentative plan to open a Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) for youth in a recently closed wing of the Sununu Youth Services Center. 

The New Hampshire Insurance Department found what it calls “a warning sign” during an investigation into whether insurance carriers in the state are following a federal law that requires insurers to cover mental health services as they would any other medical services.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

A group of providers and staff with the Department of Health and Human Services are re-examining the state’s model for how to treat young people with substance use disorders and mental health challenges, following the closure last month of the state’s sole addiction treatment center for youth. 

Children were restrained or secluded more than 20,000 times in residential youth behavioral health facilities in New Hampshire over a five year period from 2014 to 2018. That’s the finding of a new report from the Office of the Child Advocate, an independent watchdog agency that oversees the state’s Division for Children, Youth, and Families.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Portsmouth Regional Hospital and Parkland Medical Center in Derry have announced they are adding a combined 8 new inpatient psychiatric beds.

The new beds come amid a years-long statewide shortage of mental health treatment options that, among other impacts, has forced many mental health patients to languish in emergency rooms for days or even weeks.

Amidst an ongoing lawsuit over that issue, lawmakers last year passed additional funding for mental health beds in the state.

Rebroadcast: Anxious Times - Helping Kids Cope

Dec 26, 2019

We talk with a psychologist and author about how to approach conversations about frightening world events and help children process distressing news they inevitably hear about. With anxiety on the rise in kids, we hear strategies for young people and the adults who take care of them.

Original Air date: October 1, 2019

State health officials say they are planning to apply for a waiver from the federal government that would loosen restrictions on how Medicaid dollars could be spent on mental health treatment in New Hampshire.

Federal law currently prohibits the use of Medicaid dollars to pay for mental health care at facilities with more than 16 beds, to prevent the so-called “warehousing” of mental health patients with public funds.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Police in New Hampshire are calling for more resources to support officers who are struggling with mental health issues.

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., heard from law enforcement officials and mental health advocates during a roundtable Tuesday at the Nashua Police Department.

Many police departments across the state, Nashua and Manchester included, have peer support programs for employees struggling with mental health.

But Shaheen says we need more research and support for these kinds of efforts.

Courtesy T. Burdette

New research from the University of New Hampshire shows wilderness therapy is more effective and cheaper than traditional methods for treating adolescents with substance use and mental health issues.

In wilderness therapy, teenagers receive treatment in the context of outdoor experiences like backpacking trips or rock-climbing.

Imagine you are forced to go to a hospital to receive psychiatric treatment that you don’t think you need. What rights would you have?

That’s the question at the heart of a court battle between the state of New Hampshire, the ACLU, and nearly two-dozen hospitals. A ruling in the case could have profound impacts on how New Hampshire treats people who are in a mental health crisis.

Ali Oshinskie / NHPR

Mental health care providers are reacting to Governor Chris Sununu's veto of a bill that would have provided new money for mental health services in the state.

The bill, backed mostly by Democrats, would have spent $3.5 million to raise the rates that Medicaid pays out for mental health services and substance use disorder treatments.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 24, 2019

May 23, 2019

With more states passing restrictive abortion laws, we look at local reaction and examine where New Hampshire stands on this issue. Also, the New Hampshire votes to override Gov. Chris Sununu's veto of a death penalty repeal, while the Senate signs off on a series of gun control measures. Also this week, Gov. Sununu signed a bipartisan mental health bill into law. 

 

GUESTS:

Brian Pocius via Flickr CC

 

Middle and high schoolers in Coös County have a strong sense of community, but higher rates of depression than their peers in southern New Hampshire. That's according to a study released Monday by the Carsey School of Public Policy at UNH.

 In 2008,  researchers began surveying hundreds of young people in the North Country. With help from local school districts and social media, they tracked as many as they could through graduation and early adulthood.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Former Texas Congressman and presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke says climate change needs to be more of a priority in the 2020 election. Fresh off a campaign stop in flood-ravaged regions of Iowa, O’Rourke told voters in Hooksett:

“It’s not God. It’s not Mother Nature. It is us - our emissions, our excesses, our inaction in the face of the facts. And we know that this will get exponentially worse over time unless we change course now.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar is holding a roundtable discussion at Revive Recovery Center in Nashua on Monday about her plan to improve addiction and mental health services across the country.

picpedia

Dr . Robert Feder says he spends about a quarter of his time on the phone with insurance companies trying to get care approved for his patients.

These requests are often denied, he says, and criteria for "medically necessary"  care are often overly restrictive or not transparent. 

 

Pixabay

Police, firefighters, and emergency personnel have specific stressors in their daily jobs that can lead to long-term mental health impacts. We look at how the profession and our state are trying to improve its understanding, and response, to PTSD in this workforce.

 

Hundreds of high school students from around New Hampshire harnessed the power of peer-to-peer discussions Friday to tell policymakers about the pressures they face and what kinds of support they need.

DHMC

A new art exhibit opening April 1st at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center focuses on the faces of people living with mental illness.

The exhibit, called The 99 Faces Project, features life-size portraits of 33 people living with bipolar disorder, 33 people living with schizophrenia, and 33 people who love and support them.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock arts program director Marianne Barthel says the artist Lynda Michaud Cutrell wanted to challenge assumptions about what mental illness looks like.

Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers On Top D.H.H.S. Issues

Mar 26, 2019
Dan Tuohy for NHPR

We sit down with Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers. The Department of Health and Human Services is the largest state agency and accounts for approximately forty percent of the state budget. We discuss the state's ten-year mental health plan, as well as recent challenges to medicaid work requirements.  And we get an update on the state's hub and spoke system for addiction treatment, and concerns about the Division of Children, Youth and Families. 

GUEST:

Jeffrey Meyers - Appointed in 2016, Meyers is Commissioner of the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services. 

Jason Moon / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu signed three executive orders Tuesday designed to address recommendations from the state's new 10-year mental health plan.

One executive order creates a commission to study the intersection of mental illness and the justice system, including how the state can better treat inmates with mental illness so that they don't re-offend.

Jason Moon / NHPR

Earlier this month, a group of police officers, firefighters, and paramedics became the first in New Hampshire to complete an intensive course on how to react to people in mental health crisis. It brought together people with firsthand experience from both sides of that interaction.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Lawmakers are considering a bipartisan bill that would require suicide prevention education for all New Hampshire public school staff and students.

At a hearing before the Senate Eduation and Workforce Development Committe on Monday, the bill's primary sponsor, Republican Jeb Bradley, said suicide is the second leading cause of death in the state for people ages 10 to 24, and he warned that rates are rising.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House has voted to approve an advisory council to assist in the development of plans for a new psychiatric hospital.

The state's new 10-year plan for mental health plan calls for a new psychiatric hospital and Governor Chris Sununu's proposed budget calls for spending $40 million on it.

Pages