LGBTQ | New Hampshire Public Radio

LGBTQ

Courtesy Onyx Reigns

Jas LaFond was just 9 years old when they met their first drag queen. This was back in the 90s. They were at home in Hartford, Connecticut. The drag queen was Black. And she was wearing a dark, sheer dress with gold lamé and flowers.

“The makeup was on point and neat and just completely transformed from the person I had met earlier in the day,” LaFond said. “Down to the nails and the hair down up and the edges were right. Like almost this deity in our living room getting ready to go out with my mom.”

Courtesy of Queen City Pride

June is usually a busy time for Queen City Pride. The Manchester based LGBTQ organization has always held annual Pride Month celebrations, but Pride celebrations had to be moved online this year. Three Queen City Pride organizers, Elliot Wood, Birdie de Bruyn and Richella Simard want LGBTQ+ New Hampshire residents to still feel supported, so they are launching Queer 101 - an online weekly educational series on how to be a better ally and advocate for the queer community.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

Claremont’s third annual Rural Pride is moving online this year due to COVID-19. Matt Mooshian, founder of Rural Outright, the organization behind the event, says it’s important to still hold Pride events this year, especially in rural areas.

Alex McOwen for NHPR

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled yesterday that employers cannot discriminate against LGBTQ workers under the Civil Rights Act.  

State Rep. Gerri Cannon, one of New Hampshire’s first openly transgender lawmakers, joined All Thing's Considered host Peter Biello to discuss the historic decision.


Updated at 5:52 p.m.

In a historic decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects gay, lesbian, and transgender employees from discrimination based on sex. The ruling was 6-3, with Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's first appointee to the court, writing the majority opinion. The opinion was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and the court's four liberal justices.

You Asked, We Answered: Are Teenagers in N.H. Learning About Consent in Sex Ed?

Feb 19, 2020
Jimmy Gutierrez

Regardless of their formal sex education, teenagers at the beginning of their social and romantic lives often turn to each other for information. In the second episode of The Second Greatest Show on Earth’s series on sex ed in New Hampshire, we hear directly from teens about how they are navigating consent, porn, masculinity, and femininity.  

This is the second episode in our two-part series on sex education. Listen to the first installment here.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As the country engages in conversations around sex, consent, and masculinity, The Second Greatest Show on Earth investigates questions about sex education in New Hampshire.

Peter Biello/NHPR

Novelist Alex Myers came out as transgender in the mid-90s, when society's understanding of what it means to be transgender was less clear than it is today. 

In his new novel, "Continental Divide," Myers writes about 19-year-old Ron, who was born female, and grew up in Tamworth, New Hampshire. Ron decides to reinvent himself as a man by moving west to work on a ranch in Wyoming. Alex Myers is an English teacher at Philips Exeter Academy. NHPR's Peter Biello stopped by his classroom earlier this week to talk about "Continental Divide," and the challenge of coming out as transgender. 

Sara Ernst / NHPR

Portsmouth held its fourth Pride celebration on Saturday. One goal of this year’s event was to attract and show support for LGBTQ young people. 

At noon, participants gathered in Portsmouth’s Market Square, in rainbow order, for a march. They were led by the Leftist Marching Band and members of Seacoast Outright, a support and advocacy group for LGBTQ+ youth. 

 

15-year-old Gale Paguet stood at the head of the crowd, wrapped in a rainbow flag and holding a banner for Seacoast Outright -- said being bold isn’t always easy. 

Bruce Jolin

An exhibit that opened last Friday at the Portsmouth Athenaeum's Randall Gallery celebrates LGBT history on New Hampshire's Seacoast. The founder of the Seacoast LGBT History Project, Tom Kaufhold, worked for four years to collect mementos, posters, and artwork from the community. Kaufhold spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about the exhibit, which runs through July 6.

The title of this exhibit is "Seacoast LGBT History: 50 years of Rainbow Reflections." Why focus on 50 years?

Kim Cummings

Sometimes, the clothes hanging in the closet hold dreams about who we could become.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

A new program looks to pair Dartmouth medical students as mentors with LGBTQ youth in the Upper Valley.

Qmmunity is a collaboration between the Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine and the group Rural Outright.

It’s based on the idea that young people with differing sexual orientations and identities who are living in rural areas face extra challenges to their mental health and well-being.

Matt Mooshian with Rural Outright says pairing up with a Dartmouth med student will give the teens support and a positive role model.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

1st Congressional District candidates Eddie Edwards and Chris Pappas met on Wednesday morning at a debate hosted by the Manchester Chamber of Commerce debate.

Savannah Maher/NHPR

Claremont's first-ever LGBTQ Pride celebration, called Rural Pride, drew visitors from throughout Sullivan County and beyond on Saturday. NHPR's Savannah Maher stopped by and sent us this audio postcard.

Ludovic Bertron/Wikimedia Commons

Members and allies of the Concord area LGBTQ community with gather on Saturday for the second annual Pride Concord event.

Organizer Alison Murphy says it’s a way to celebrate the region’s LGBTQ community.

Barbara Follett had done more by the age of 25 than many will do in their lifetime. Including vanishing. Today on the show, the disappearance of an American prodigy... and how we forgot her. Plus, the rediscovery of the first known published African American in the country -- a woman from New Hampshire -- and how one woman figured out how to bring LGBTQ pride back to Concord year after year.

N.H. Bill Banning Gay Conversion Therapy Sent to Sununu

May 10, 2018
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

The New Hampshire House has sent to the governor a bill that would ban therapy that attempts to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of minors.

House lawmakers on Thursday agreed to accept changes made to the bill by the Senate and advance it to Republican Gov. Chris Sununu, who has said he supports banning such therapy.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Tony Strat stands in the grass outside his screen-printing studio in the Upper Valley, washing the ink off of used screens with a hose. Even though he’s scrubbed the screens down, shadows of  designs he’s printed are still visible. “Gender is a social construct,” one of them reads.

Strat, 26, is an artist, entrepreneur and athlete. He’s worked in finance and started his own skateboarding company. He's also transgender. He started his transition process last year.

Transgender Military Ban Raises Concern at VA

Aug 24, 2017

Officials with the VA hospital in White River Junction are stressing this week that veterans are welcome at the hospital regardless of gender or sexual identity.

Details of new White House guidelines for the Pentagon emerged Wednesday and were confirmed by NPR. Under those guidelines, transgender people will be banned from enlisting and those in active service will be subject to removal at the discretion of Defense Secretary James Mattis.

Peter Biello

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

VA to LGBTQ Veterans: You're Welcome Here

Jun 14, 2017
Britta Greene / NHPR

Four panelists -- three of them veterans -- answered questions about their personal experiences navigating gender and sexuality issues at a public discussion at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont on Wednesday.

The event was part of a broader effort by the VA to let veterans know they can be honest about their gender and sexuality and still access medical care within the VA system.

Peter Biello

The Log Cabin Republicans have long had a national presence, and now they have a New Hampshire chapter. The group of conservative supporters of LGBT rights formed last month and will hold a launch event on Friday at 5:30pm at the One Hundred Club in Portsmouth, during which Governor Chris Sununu is scheduled to speak. It’s an effort, they say, to show that the Republican party is unified.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

New Hampshire Attorney General Joe Foster and the New Hampshire ACLU filed “amicus” briefs in court on Thursday. The briefs side with the Obama Administration in a lawsuit brought by Texas and 10 other states that pushes back against federal guidance urging schools to allow students to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

K. Rosseel / Morguefile

Emily Heath is Senior Pastor at the Congregational Church in Exeter, and she recently returned from a trip to her hometown, Orlando. She was among five New England responders to provide what she calls “spiritual first aid” to people dealing with trauma from the shooting. Pastor Emily joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss her experience.

So what was it like to be there, on the ground with those folks, helping them out?

Castle Lass / Morguefile

Methodists from churches all over New England met last week at the New England Methodist Conference in Manchester. At that conference, they passed a resolution that attempts to make the broader church more inclusive for LGBTQIA people. It’s a decision that may have deeper resonance now after the attack at a gay nightclub in Orlando last week. Beth DiCocco is spokesperson for the New England Conference and she joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss this resolution.

What is the Methodist Church's position on homosexuality?

Smart Sign / Flickr/CC

The Obama administration's recent directive addressing the use of school bathrooms and other facilities by transgender students heightened a debate playing out in several states over so-called bathroom bills and transgender rights.  We'll look at how New Hampshire schools and communities are responding.


Brady Carlson / NHPR

  The Human Rights Campaign has ranked seven of New Hampshire’s eight biggest cities below average when it comes to gay and transgender rights.

11.11.15: Veterans Day

Nov 11, 2015
kataaca via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/t5FiQK

Since World War II, as many as 100,000 service members have been “less than honorably discharged” for being gay. Now, four years after the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” gay vets look to change the record. Today, what goes into rewriting history. And prior to the Civil War, images of battle were the stuff of legends and mystery – then came the photographs of Alexander Gardner. Plus, other stories about our nation’s veterans. 

George via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/tmp3jA

Since World War II, as many as 100,000 service members have been “less than honorably discharged” for being gay. Now, four years after the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” gay vets look to change the record. Today, what goes into rewriting history. Then, forgery in the art industry is not rare -- but a con artist who has been caught and never sent to jail is. We’ll speak to the directors of a film that looks inside the mind of the mischievous shut-in and skilled artist who donated masterful forgeries to more than 46 museums. 

Mirko Isaia / Flickr, creative commons

Portsmouth will host its first Pride festival this weekend. Festival organizers say the festival has been in the works since early winter.  Now that the Supreme Court upheld gay marriage in all 50 states, Seacoast Outright board chair Chuck Rhoades says, "I think there’s a little extra oomph, a little extra joy, and another reason to celebrate."

Seacoast Outright is a nonprofit that supports LGBT youth.  The organization faced funding and volunteer shortages last year. With a new board and director, Rhoades says, the group is revitalizing. 

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