Insurrection at the Capitol | New Hampshire Public Radio

Insurrection at the Capitol

Scenes of insurrection at the Capitol
Screen capture

Former President Donald Trump is on trial for a second time in the Senate. This time, the House has impeached Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection. Trump's defense team denies he directly called for violence and argues that he should not be tried since he is no longer in office. The House impeachment managers say he must be held accountable for the violence at the Capitol.

Keene Man Charged In Connection With U.S. Capital Insurrection

Feb 9, 2021

A Keene man has been charged in federal court in connection with the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, with authorities alleging he stole a bottle of wine and a book from a Senate office, among other actions.

U.S. Capitol
House.gov

A judge is deciding whether a New Hampshire man accused of threatening to kill members of Congress in December will remain jailed while his case proceeds.

Ryder Winegar, 33, of Amherst, is accused of leaving phone messages for six members of Congress on Dec. 16 threatening to hang them if they didn't support former President Donald Trump.

Washington, D.C., is in defense mode ahead of Wednesday's presidential inauguration.

Armored vehicles and troops are positioned around the Capitol and other government buildings. Many streets are closed, as authorities brace for protests and potential violence from supporters of President Trump and extremist groups who are threatening another assault like the one at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 6.

National Guard soldiers have been arriving from all 50 states and three U.S. territories.

Governors across the nation are fortifying statehouses amid fears of possibly violent protests in the lead-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday.

Next week's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden will see the biggest security presence of any inauguration in U.S. history. For days, thousands of National Guard troops have been pouring into the capital, and by Wednesday's ceremony, up to 25,000 troops will be in place to guard against security threats.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu is starting his third term as governor of New Hampshire. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley spoke with Sununu Friday about the challenges facing the state, events this past week in Washington, and what he hopes to accomplish in the next two years.

Rioters at U.S. Capitol
JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP

Thomas Gallagher, of Bridgewater, is the first person from New Hampshire who has been arrested and charged for participating in last week’s riot. 

Gallagher is accused of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. The second offense is violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Dan Tuohy, NHPR

N.H. House Speaker Sherman Packard from Londonderry says State House security is taking precautions after reports of planned protests in connection with President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration. Republicans in the state legislature elected Packard last week after he served as acting speaker following the COVID-19 death of his predecessor, Dick Hinch. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR / NHPR

The U.S. House voted to impeach Donald Trump for a second time on Wednesday, this time for incitement of an insurrection. This follows last week's events when pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol, an incident that left five people dead.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with New Hampshire Democratic Representative Annie Kuster, who voted for impeachment.

Hundreds of National Guard Troops inside the Capitol Visitor Center to reinforce security on Wednesday during the impeachment vote.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The past four years, from the Mueller investigation, the first impeachment of President Trump, and the discussions about presidential pardons, have demonstrated the complicated Constitutional questions of how a sitting President may be held accountable. After the House voted for a second time to impeach President Trump, we talk about what's next, as we near the transition of power. What do you think Congress should do next?

Air date: Thursday, January 14, 2021. 

Pease Air National Guard sign
Dan Tuohy / NHPR

About 50 members of the New Hampshire National Guard are heading to Washington to bolster security during the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

As NHPR's Josh Rogers reports, Gov. Chris Sununu is backing the deployment, which he said was "to protect and defend democracy."

Speaker Nancy Pelosi
NPR screen capture

President Donald Trump has been impeached by the U.S. House over the violent siege of the Capitol.

He is the only president to be twice impeached. He faced a single charge "incitement of insurrection" in Wednesday's vote after he encouraged a mob of loyalists to, as he put it, "fight like hell" against election results.

U.S. House
house.gov

The U.S. House of Representatives is debating an article of impeachment today against President Trump following the violence at the U.S. Capitol. The article charges Trump with "incitement of insurrection."

As the House debated impeaching President Trump, security was heightened Wednesday all around the Capitol, with barricades set several blocks from the Capitol building and law enforcement and national guard officials checking badges for anyone to enter the perimeter even by foot.

An Amherst man will remain in custody pending a bail hearing after he allegedly left threatening voicemails for members of Congress.

U.S. House
NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is taking up a resolution that would call on Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and take over President Trump's duties.

The effort comes as the House is also pursuing a second impeachment against the president over the insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6. 

Subscribe to Primarily Politics, NHPR's weekly politics newsletter

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

At least three Democratic members of Congress have tested positive for the coronavirus this week, blaming their results on their Republican colleagues' refusal to wear face masks during the hours-long lockdown last Wednesday as pro-Trump extremists attacked the U.S. Capitol.

Dave Lane / Union Leader

Gov.  Chris Sununu is criticizing President Trump's role in the storming of the Capitol last week, but he stopped short of calling for Trump's impeachment, saying the focus needs to be on ensuring an orderly transition of power.

Updated on Monday at 2:15 p.m. ET

Howard Liebengood, a 15-year veteran of the U.S. Capitol Police, died Saturday off duty, according to the force. His cause of death was suicide, an attorney for the family said on Monday.

Updated at 9:41 p.m. ET

Pennsylvania's Pat Toomey is the second Republican U.S. senator to call for President Trump's resignation in the wake of Wednesday's attack by Trump supporters on the U.S. Capitol, as House Democrats developed their plans to impeach the president.

Toomey on Sunday joined his Senate colleague Lisa Murkowski, an Alaska Republican, in calling for Trump to resign.

The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, says "hundreds" of people may ultimately face charges related to the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, which interrupted a session of Congress and left five people dead.

Sherwin spoke with NPR's Martin Kaste in an exclusive interview Saturday evening about the multiagency investigation, the challenges officials face and what they'll be looking for.

The violence at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday was unprecedented in modern U.S. history — but some pro-Trump extremists are promising it was just a taste of things to come.

"Many of Us will return on January 19, 2021, carrying Our weapons, in support of Our nation's resolve, towhich [sic] the world will never forget!!!" one person wrote on Parler, a site friendly to right-wing extremists. "We will come in numbers that no standing army or police agency can match."

justice.gov

The United States Attorney for New Hampshire says he will investigate and, if warranted, prosecute any New Hampshire residents who committed crimes during the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol following a rally for President Trump earlier this week.

Officer Brian Sicknick, 42, died after sustaining injuries in the line of duty at the U.S. Capitol.
U.S.

The FBI and Washington, D.C., Metro police are asking the public for help identifying some of the people involved in assaults, break-ins and vandalism at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. The FBI is asking anyone with information to submit it here, along with any photos or video.

In a September presidential debate, President Donald Trump told the Proud Boys “to stand back and stand by.” The Proud Boys are a right-wing extremist group with ties to white supremacy. But those comments weren’t the first time he appeared to encourage violence from his base. And on Wednesday, hundreds of pro-Trump insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol building.

Rioters at U.S. Capitol
JOSE LUIS MAGANA / AP

Members of New Hampshire’s congressional delegation say they support growing efforts to remove President Trump from office, either by impeachment or use of the 25th Amendment, one day after he incited supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol and halt the certification of Joe Biden as president-elect.

When a pro-Trump mob attacked the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, surprisingly few police stood in the way. Protests had been expected for days, but police appeared unprepared for an actual insurrection and not even prepared to keep all the doors locked. Video showed police calmly talking with attackers after they moved into the building.

Pages