healthcare exchanges

44,412 New Hampshire residents signed up for or switched their health insurance plans on healthcare.gov during the Affordable Care Act's open enrollment period.

The number is just slightly down from last year's total of 44,581.

That trend is in line with national enrollment numbers which ticked downward 1.7%.

The health insurance market for individuals has remained relatively stable in New Hampshire in recent years, despite steep cuts in federal funding for advertising and outreach.

Allison Quantz | NHPR

Three weeks into the federal healthcare exchange's open enrollment period, there are fewer new enrollees in New Hampshire compared to last year.

Since November 1st, 7,851 people in New Hampshire have signed up for a new plan or switched their plans on Healthcare.gov. That's down from 9,027 during the same period last year.

Zandra Rice-Hawkins with the non-profit Granite State Progress says severe cuts in federal funding for advertising the healthcare exchanges is driving the decline.

dbking / Flickr Creative Commons

The United States Supreme Court is expected to decide a case this month that could be do or die for President Obama’s signature healthcare law. At issue are the subsidies available to people who purchase insurance plans on Healthcare.gov, also called the healthcare exchange. New Hampshire is one of 36 states using this federally-operated insurance marketplace, and if the Supreme Court rules in favor of the plaintiff in the case, about 30,000 people in New Hampshire may see their subsidies disappear.

Saturday marked the beginning of the second round of open enrollment for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. And in New Hampshire that means a lot more options this time around for the nearly 100,000 residents without insurance.

Here's the problem: five insurers offering forty plans, each with varying premiums, deductibles, coinsurance, and co-pays. Who could blame you for being confused?

healthcare.gov

  Two more insurance companies say they plan to sell policies in New Hampshire’s health exchange in 2015, bringing the total to five carriers. The suddenly crowded field is a sharp contrast to this year, when only Anthem is offering policies through healthcare.gov.

Harvard Pilgrim and Minuteman Health, both based in Massachusetts, announced their intentions to join the exchange earlier this year, and now the New Hampshire Insurance Department says Assurant Health and Maine Community Health Options have also submitted plans for regulatory review.