Jack Rodolico

Senior Producer/Reporter, Podcasts & Special Projects

Jack has spent his career in public radio and podcasting producing narrative-driven investigative journalism that delivers an emotional impact. He is the recipient of more than a dozen local and national awards, including a National Edward R. Murrow Award and finalist nods from the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Dart Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma.

Jack was the lead reporter on “A Mountain of Misconduct” and “Heroin Diaries”, both collaborations with Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. He was senior reporter on “Last Seen”, a podcast from WBUR and The Boston Globe about the greatest art heist in history.

He has covered opioid addiction for National Public Radio and he reported and produced “Monumental Dilemma” for 99% Invisible, a story about the racist origins of the oldest monument dedicated to a woman in the United States.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

For parents staying at home right now, there's added pressure besides trying to figure out work, money, and other stressors related to the coronavirus pandemic. That pressure is all about learning at home...and we're wondering, how's that going in your house?

This program aired on Wednesday, April 1st.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

What are your favorite homebound hobbies? Have you taken up any new ones or rediscovered old ones now that coronavirus has you at home a lot more?

This program aired on Tuesday, March 31st.

NHPR's reporters and producers are working around the clock to bring you the latest on this critical story. Click here to make a donation to support our newsroom. 

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Sara Plourde | NHPR

What do you miss right now? What are you looking forward to when things go back to whatever normal they go back to?

This program aired on Monday, March 30th.

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New Hampshire Calling is NHPR's pop-up call-in show designed to connect you with us - and with each other - in the time of coronavirus. We invite you to call in to talk about how your life and family are being affected right now....and how you're holding up. And yes, feel free to share what's bringing you joy in this unprecedented time.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

With most people staying at home right now, family dynamics and relationships are shifting in ways we couldn't have expected.

This program aired on Thursday, March 26th.

Listen to the episode:

New Hampshire Calling is NHPR's pop-up call-in show designed to connect you with us - and with each other - in the time of coronavirus. We invite you to call in to talk about how your life and family are being affected right now....and how you're holding up. And yes, feel free to share what's bringing you joy in this unprecedented time.

Sara Plourde | NHPR

We're living in weird times...so, what's bringing you joy right now?

This program aired on Wednesday, March 25th.

Listen to the episode:

New Hampshire Calling is NHPR's pop-up call-in show designed to connect you with us - and with each other - in the time of coronavirus. We invite you to call in to talk about how your life and family are being affected right now....and how you're holding up. And yes, feel free to share what's bringing you joy in this unprecedented time.

Editor's note: This report contains a racial slur.

Here's one thing historians know to be true about Harriet Wilson: Some indomitable part of her spirit allowed her to survive a life on the margins of American society.

Copyright 2020 New Hampshire Public Radio. To see more, visit New Hampshire Public Radio.

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When police in New Hampshire use deadly force, it’s most likely on someone who is armed, intoxicated and often severely mentally ill. That’s according to an NHPR review of police shootings in the state over nearly two decades.

So how do police make a decision to shoot or not shoot when they know the person they’re pointing a gun at is suicidal, psychotic or intoxicated?

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

State forestry officials are warning warm, dry weather is creating an increased threat of wildfires, especially in the southern part of the state.

Jack Rodolico

The head of the state's food stamp program gave testimony Wednesday that rebutted supporters of a bill that aims to reduce eligibility for the program. 

SAINT LUKE INSTITUTE

Pope Francis has dismissed a New Hampshire priest from the clergy.

Monsignor Edward Arsenault was the public face of the Diocese of Manchester during the Catholic sex abuse scandal in the mid-2000s.

Arsenault later pleaded guilty to stealing $300,000 from a hospital, a bishop and the estate of a deceased priest.

Father George DeLaire, vicar for canonical affairs for the diocese, says Arsenault has been unable to repay the money he embezzled.

Jack Rodolico

Hannah Berkowitz is 20 years old and when she was a senior in high school her life flew off the rails. 

She was abusing drugs. She was suicidal. Berkowitz moved into a therapeutic boarding school to get sober. But she could only stay sober while she was on campus during the week.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A former Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court has been hired to work for Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

Former Chief Justice John Broderick will start next week as Senior Director for Public Affairs. Dartmouth-Hitchcock says Broderick will advocate on behalf of the hospital to policymakers and business and community leaders in the region. 

Jack Rodolico

Gordon MacDonald is a step closer to becoming New Hampshire’s next Attorney General. On Tuesday, he met with the Executive Council to discuss his nomination by Governor Chris Sununu.

MacDonald is an experienced lawyer. Some of his highest profile cases have been battling the State of New Hampshire - and the very office he now seeks to lead.  

Brian Wallstin

A New Hampshire physician's assistant was arrested Friday by federal agents on allegations he received kickbacks for prescribing large amounts of an opioid painkiller. According to officials, Clough was the state's top prescriber of a fentanyl spray called Subsys.

Related story on Clough: Opioid Prescriber's Story a Cautionary Tale as N.H. Face Growing Crisis

Nixon Peabody

Gov. Chris Sununu has nominated Gordon MacDonald, a well-known Manchester attorney, to serve as Attorney General. MacDonald's clients include a major opioid maker being investigated by the state.

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

About 30 people, including four children, have been displaced after a fire ripped through their Concord apartment building Sunday evening.

The Concord Fire Department says a cigarette started the blaze, which damaged three or four apartments but then cut power off to the entire building, about 30 apartments.

Jennifer D'Entremont says it was close to midnight when she took her eight-year old son into the cold in their pajamas.

Portsmouth Regional Hospital

Portsmouth Regional Hospital will open more beds to psychiatric patients. The hospital hopes those beds will alleviate a backlog of patients boarded in emergency rooms.

On one day last month, a record 68 patients in acute mental health crises were stuck in emergency rooms around the state, waiting for a bed at New Hampshire Hospital, the state's lone psychiatric hospital. Now Portsmouth Regional will increase its inpatient psychiatric beds from eight to twelve in the hopes of chipping away at that wait time. 

AARP is taking a stand against the proposed healthcare overhall making its way through the House of Representatives.

AARP claims 233,000 members in New Hampshire, and the group says it basically doesn't like anything about the bill proposed by Congressional Republicans. On a conference all with reporters Thursday, AARP Legislative Policy Director David Certner said the bill would downshift the cost of healthcare to families and state government.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The New Hampshire Hospital Association says a federal court ruling last week means state budget writers owe hospitals $80 million on top of what the governor has already proposed. But the head of the house finance committee disagrees. 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The New Hampshire Hospital Association has won a court case against the federal government. It could mean more public money going to hospitals to cover the cost of providing uncompensated care.

Jack Rodolico

Brady Sullivan Properties, one of New Hampshire's biggest developers, will pay a fine for violating federal lead paint laws. 

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Brady Sullivan did not disclose the existence of chipping lead paint to tenants of Mill West in Manchester before they moved in. Then the landlord exposed tenants to lead dust from a construction site below apartments.

Jack Rodolico for NHPR

A bill in the state Senate would tighten eligibility for SNAP benefits, commonly called food stamps. That bill was written, in part, by a conservative, Florida-based think tank that’s pushed similar measures around the country. 

Eden via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5qAdh9

A bill in the State Senate could sharply reduce the number of people eligible for SNAP benefits, commonly called food stamps.

Senate Bill 7 would basically make it harder to get food stamps in New Hampshire by changing financial eligibility and other requirements for applicants.

On Tuesday, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee heard testimony against the bill from the New Hampshire Food Bank and New Hampshire Legal Assistance. Sarah Mattson Dustin, of Legal Assistance, told lawmakers the bill will downshift the cost of feeding low-income families.

rcf50022 on YouTube / https://youtu.be/e1cYFp3o6cw

After nearly two weeks of steady snow storms across the state, New Hampshire's ski mountains are getting ready for a busy few weeks. 

Massachusetts schools are on break next week, and New Hampshire schools the following week. That's just in time for ideal ski conditions, says Greg Keeler at Cannon Mountain.

"And we get something called Notch Effect snowfall. It made the cloud stay here and it forced the snow out of the cloud right in the region of Cannon."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program has been a success. That conclusion is a shift from his prior statements about the program, which has provided health insurance to more than 50,000 Granite Staters.

Thomas Fearon

Prompted by the suicide of a former patient last summer, an independent committee has wrapped up an investigation into care at New Hampshire Hospital.

Last July, 63-year-old Joy Silva jumped from her third-floor apartment in Nashua shortly after being discharged from the state psychiatric hospital. The obvious question that followed was: Could New Hampshire Hospital have done more to prevent Silva's suicide?

Episcopal Church of New Hampshire

Faith leaders in New Hampshire are speaking out against President Donald Trump's executive order that stops refugees from entering the country.

Christian, Muslim and Jewish leaders are looking to their faith to explain their opposition to the immigration and refugee ban.

CREDIT DILOZ VIA FLICKR CC / HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/9LZEHD

The outgoing Director of the Division of Children, Youth and Families says public scrutiny of her agency’s shortcomings could provide opportunities to improve the state’s child safety network.

Jack Rodolico

Catholic Medical Center in Manchester is your typical general hospital: they deliver babies, set broken bones, perform heart surgery. And it might be as good a place as any to witness how the opioid epidemic is transforming healthcare in New Hampshire.

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