George Floyd | New Hampshire Public Radio

George Floyd

A statewide commission on police accountability and transparency has sent Gov. Chris Sununu recommendations for reforms to police training in New Hampshire.

Sununu created the commission in mid-June in response to the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

Updated at 2:14 p.m. ET

The family of George Floyd has filed a civil lawsuit against the City of Minneapolis and the four former police officers involved in the Black man's killing on Memorial Day. Civil rights and personal injury attorney Ben Crump, along with co-counsel Antonio Romanucci, announced the lawsuit at a news conference Wednesday in Minneapolis.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday called for the removal of statues of Confederate soldiers and officials from the U.S. Capitol as reignited conversations about the nation's treatment of racial minorities have once again brought the monuments' history into question.

In an open letter to the Joint Committee on the Library, Pelosi asked Congress to "lead by example" and remove 11 Confederate statues from the Capitol.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Philonise Floyd laid bare his anguish over the death of his brother George at the hands of police as he testified in front of the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday.

House Judiciary

A day after George Floyd's funeral in Houston, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee is holding hearings on racial profiling and policing practices in America.

Floyd's brother is among those scheduled to testify before the committee today, June 10.

New Hampshire Calling: What Does It Mean To Be An Ally

For white people who have just recently recognized their own complicity in America's racist systems and are looking to "fix" that — it's not going to happen overnight.

"It's a little bit like saying 'I want to be in shape tomorrow' ..." says author Robin DiAngelo. "This is going to be a process."

Activists protesting police brutality are calling on cities and states to defund their police. Funding for local law enforcement now increasingly comes from the federal government.

Federal departments ranging from the Department of Justice to the Department of Agriculture have grant programs aimed at hiring more police, equipping them and constructing new police facilities.

Some experts say that federal involvement undermines community accountability and focuses more on enforcement than minimizing harm.

JimUrquhart - NPR

NHPR is continuing coverage around state, national and global reaction to the killing of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis, and related events.

The funeral service for Mr. Floyd will take place today, June 9, in his hometown of Houston.

Beginning at noon EST, NHPR will broadcast the service live on-air, via partner station Houston Public Media

Jim Urquhart / NPR

The funeral service for George Floyd, 46, who was killed by police in Minneapolis on Memorial Day, will be held Tuesday, June 9, at The Fountain of Praise in Houston. 

Christina Phillips for NHPR

Demonstrators filled several blocks in Concord on Saturday as they marched to the State House to peacefully support Black Lives Matter. The event was organized by local students, who spoke to protesters from the steps of the State House.

NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviewed Samuel Alicea, a student leader at Saturday's march.

Updated 10:50 p.m. ET

Mourners gathered for a final public memorial to George Floyd on Monday in his hometown of Houston.

Floyd, who was killed by police on May 25, was honored Monday afternoon at The Fountain of Praise church during a viewing that drew a stream of visitors through the day.

As protests against police brutality have unfolded across the country, calls to defund or abolish police departments are picking up traction among activists and even sparked a pledge by the Minneapolis City Council to "dismantle" the police force there. But Joe Biden's campaign said on Monday that the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee does not support that approach.

Judge Jeannice M. Reding set bail for Derek Chauvin at $1 million with conditions during a court hearing Monday, making the former Minneapolis police officer eligible for supervised release.

Chauvin, who is white, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of George Floyd, a black man. He attended the Hennepin County District Court hearing in Minneapolis via video link.

The former police officer could also be released without conditions at a higher bail amount of $1.25 million.

NHPR continues to bring listeners special programming related to national and global protests over the death of George Floyd in police custody.

A district court judge is denying bail for a 19-year-old arrested this week after he allegedly posted a message on Facebook encouraging protesters to flip over police cars in Manchester.

Daniel Zeron of Ashland is charged with criminal threatening for his social media post, which was up for less than 24 hours before being deleted.

Retired Marine Gen. Jim Mattis, who resigned as President Trump's defense secretary nearly a year and a half ago over policy differences, has issued an extraordinary critique of the White House's handling of nationwide unrest, saying Trump has sought to divide Americans and warning against "militarizing our response" to the protests.

Updated at 5:16 p.m. ET

Derek Chauvin now faces a charge of second-degree murder in addition to earlier charges, and three other former Minneapolis police officers who were involved in George Floyd's death face charges of aiding and abetting murder, according to new court documents.

Nationwide and global protests continue over the death of George Floyd in police custody. NHPR continues to bring listeners special programming, the latest news and conversation as events unfold. Tune in this Friday, June 5, for a special broadcast from Minnesota Public Radio and American Public Media. 

Courtesy

Saturday's protests in Manchester drew as many as a thousand people. Black Lives Matter of Manchester helped organize the peaceful demonstration, which gathered in Veterans Park.

NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviewed Ronelle Tshiela, a local organizer who spoke Saturday in New Hampshire's largest city.

Ali Oshinskie for NHPR

Protests in cities across the U.S. and in New Hampshire are turning the focus to the often fraught relationship between law enforcement and communities of color.

Sean Locke is director of the state's Civil Rights Unit in the Attorney General's Office, where he works on some of these issues.  

(Below is a lightly edited transcript of this interview.)

Sean Locke, thank you for speaking with me.

Thank you.

Christina Phillips/NHPR

Grieving and calls to action against police brutality and systemic racism are happening across New Hampshire. We talk with local organizers about their missions, and how they're navigating activism during the pandemic. Are you attending a protest or vigil? Tell us why you demonstrate?

Air date: Wednesday, June 3, 2020. 

Michael Brindley for NHPR

 

 

An upcoming vigil organized by the Greater Nashua Area Branch of the NAACP and Black Lives Matter Nashua will be a call to action in honor of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other victims of police brutality, according to Jordan Thompson, racial justice organizer for ACLU-NH and founder of Black Lives Matter Nashua, which officially launches this week.

 

 

 

 

A 19-year old Ashland resident has been arrested and charged with criminal threatening for allegedly posting messages on Facebook encouraging protesters to tip over police cars in Manchester.

Daniel Zeron was detained early Tuesday morning, according to Manchester police, after he allegedly made the social media post from inside of a house in Ashland.

Jason Moon/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu said he disagrees with President Trump’s calls on Monday for governors to “dominate” people taking to the streets to protest the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

Updated at 9:31 p.m. ET

Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them."

Trump's Rose Garden remarks came as just across the street, law enforcement officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters. Washington, D.C., had set a curfew Monday of 7 p.m. ET.

President Trump threatened Monday to take military action in American cities if the violent demonstrations that have been taking place in recent days aren't stamped out.

"If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them," Trump said in a short statement in the Rose Garden at the White House.

Updated at 8:29 p.m. ET

U.S. protesters rallying against the killing of George Floyd and countless other black Americans are being heard around the world as demonstrators launched their own protests in the countries such as the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Iran and New Zealand.

Updated 2:25 p.m. ET

Protesters staged large-scale demonstrations across the country on Sunday, expressing outrage at the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and, more broadly, anger at police brutality. Some cities, including Minneapolis, Atlanta and Louisville, saw clashes with police, buildings and cars set afire, and looting.

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

As overlapping crises convulse an anxious nation, President Trump on Sunday sought to cast blame for widespread protests gripping cities on "radical-left anarchists," while adding that the media "is doing everything within their power to foment hatred and anarchy."

Updated at 12:29 p.m.

Police and demonstrators clashed in dozens of cities across the U.S. on Saturday during another night of protests in response to the death of George Floyd.

Pages