Consumer Protection | New Hampshire Public Radio

Consumer Protection

Genevieve Andress for NHPR

What happens when a restaurant doesn’t follow social distancing guidelines? Or when restaurant employees who interact with customers don’t wear their required face masks?

Violations of coronavirus guidelines usually end up in the hands of the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office by way of the phone number and email established for concerns regarding executive orders and guidelines.

The Single Greatest Way To Impact NH Politics

Mar 22, 2019

Before any bill can become a law in New Hampshire, it has to have at least one public hearing, where anyone can show up and talk to their lawmakers face to face. You can tell them what you think about the bill. A lot of people have never testified at a public hearing—it’s confusing to figure when they happen and where and how to participate. So, to demystify the whole thing, Civics 101: New Hampshire is breaking down how they work. 

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The New Hampshire Attorney General's office has reached an agreement with a rug store owner who has been advertising a going out of business sale since last fall.

Attorney General Joseph Foster said the state entered into an agreement with Menashe Cohen, doing business as Epic Oriental Rugs of Hampton, to resolve allegations that he violated the state's Consumer Protection Act. Cohen published ads until April.

The act prohibits advertising such a sale that lasts for more than 60 days.