Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
LIMITED TIME ONLY: Discounted Pint Glass/Tote Bag Combo at $10 sustaining member level.

Saint-Marc, tapped as federal magistrate judge, poised to make history in NH

Talesha Saint-Marc, an attorney with Bernstein Shur, has been selected as a Magistrate Judge for New Hampshire's federal court.
Jason Levasseur
/
Bernstein Shur
Talesha Saint-Marc, an attorney with Bernstein Shur, has been selected as a Magistrate Judge for New Hampshire's federal court.

Talesha Saint-Marc has been selected to serve as a federal magistrate judge in New Hampshire. She’s the first Black person to serve on the federal bench in the state, according to a court spokesperson.

Saint-Marc is a graduate of Franklin Pierce College, and studied law at Northeastern University. According to her online biography, she clerked for New Hampshire Supreme Court Associate Justice Carol Ann Conboy, as well as the state’s Superior Court. She’s currently a shareholder at Bernstein Shur, focusing on labor and employment law.

Saint-Marc was selected by a panel to fill a newly created second magistrate position in New Hampshire’s federal district courthouse.

“She is a tremendously talented and successful lawyer, and she has an unwavering commitment to public service,” said Chief Judge Landya McCafferty in a statement. “Her intellect, empathy, and experience, when combined with her measured and calm demeanor, will make her an outstanding judge.”

Unlike District Court judges, magistrates serve renewable eight year terms, and are appointed by a committee. They can issue warrants, oversee pre-trial motions and preside over civil trials, if all parties consent.

Saint-Marc is expected to begin serving in the role in June.

Todd started as a news correspondent with NHPR in 2009. He spent nearly a decade in the non-profit world, working with international development agencies and anti-poverty groups. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University.
Related Content

You make NHPR possible.

NHPR is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.