Unsung

Unsung is an ongoing series that explores the stories of New Hampshire women (past and present) we think we know, and those we don't, as told from a modern perspective.  New stories every month on the first Wednesday on Morning Edition. 

Columbia University Archives

Barbara Follett became an overnight success when she wrote The House Without Windows in 1927, with one review calling it “almost unbearably beautiful.” Barbara was a star... at just twelve years old.  

Barbara Follett was Stefan Cooke's mother’s half-sister. Stefan says he hadn’t heard much about Barbara as a child. When he started a genealogy project a few years ago, the plan was to research the whole family. But it was Barbara’s story that really grabbed him. And then found her papers archived at Columbia University.

Some kids spend their summers swimming and paddling. Others hammering and drilling.

 

Bella and Kaylee are two of the leaders of Girls at Work. It’s a program for girls based in Manchester that teaches girls how to build everything from shelves to picnic tables using power tools.

 

Sara Plourde, NHPR

NHPR presents a one hour music special celebrating May Day, hosted by Producer Emily Quirk. 

We’ll examine American labor history through the lens of roots, blues, Americana, and rock genres spanning the last 100+ years.

This program aired on Friday, May 3 at 8 p.m. and on Sunday, May 5 at 6 p.m.

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Unsung: Marilla Ricker

May 1, 2019

In the late 1800s Marilla Ricker opened the door for women to practice law in New Hampshire. But as Jason Moon reports, some lawyers practicing today say on that issue, we haven’t made as much progress as you might think.

Unsung: Ona Judge

Apr 3, 2019

Ona Judge isn’t a household name. Perhaps, in part, because she exemplifies our nation’s shameful past. Judge was Martha Washington’s slave -- her personal handmaid. For most of the 1790s, the President and his family lived in the nation’s capital of Philadelphia. Ona Judge occupied a room over the kitchen. 

That is, until dinnertime on May 21st, 1796, when she stepped outside and never looked back. Two days later, an ad appeared in the Philadelphia Gazette offering a ten dollar reward for her return.