Route 4

Courtesy of Camp Yavneh

NHPR is exploring Route 4 this summer: its sights and sounds and can’t miss stops, along with some of the curious places that exist just off the historic highway.

That includes a little known camp that has welcomed Jewish kids and families for 75 years. Camp Yavneh offers all of the must-have summer activities: swimming, s’mores, arts and crafts, and games.

But it also provides kosher meals, an on-site rabbi to lead prayers, and a rich Shabbat celebration to welcome in the day of rest on Friday evenings. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

Drive a bit off Route 4 in Northwood, and you’ll reach a 200-year old farmhouse with a big maple tree in the front yard. The woman who lives there, Joann Weeks Bailey, is 91 years old.

As part of the Explore Route 4 series, NHPR’s Sarah Gibson met the town historian at her 1819 home to capture some of her reflections on Northwood and how it has changed.


Daniela Allee / NHPR

Along Route 4 in Canaan, there are a couple of options to grab a bite to eat: the gas station, a pizza place, a Chinese restaurant. But there wasn't a coffee shop. That is, until earlier this year when two cafes opened not far from one another. As part of the summer series, Exploring Route 4, NHPR's Daniela Allee gives us a peek into what it's like when a town of 4,000 has a bit of a coffee shop boom.

Peter Biello / NHPR

If you drive along Route 4 in Epsom, you may notice a varnished wooden sign with a pine tree logo beckoning you to Blasty Bough Brewing Company. Turn past that sign and travel a mile or so down the road, and you’ll find a rustic red barn with a porch and greenhouse, surrounded by trees, fields and plants.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

 

If you drive Route 4 through Northwood, you pass a cluster of colorful cabins by a small lake: the Cottages at Harvey Lake. Generations of travelers have gone there to relax, despite it being just a stone’s throw from one of the busiest roads in the state.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Antique Alley, perhaps the most famous stretch of Route 4, is located roughly between Chichester and the Lee traffic circle.

The miles-long shopping destination is dotted with both higher-end and more eclectic antique dealers. In the 1980s and 1990s, it was the spot for bargain hunters looking for a piece of traditional Americana, everything from solid furniture to tools to handicrafts.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

The late poet Donald Hall had fans all over the world, but he was perhaps most loved here in New Hampshire. Many of his friends believed, as he did, that his small white farmhouse on Route 4 in Wilmot would stay in his family after he died. So it came as a surprise earlier this spring to hear the house was going on the market.

For N.H.'s Last Roller Rink, End of an Era Looms

Apr 5, 2019
Courtesy of Debbie DeHavens

The last remaining roller rink in all of Vermont or New Hampshire sits near the bottom of a hill in the Upper Valley town of Enfield, N.H. It’s on a rural stretch of Route 4, the main road running through town.

It’s hard to believe the place is still in business. Sometimes there’s just couple of cars sitting in the parking lot, even on a weekend evening or afternoon.

Via waterfrontagent.com

In our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we tackle listener questions about the Granite State communities and occasionally get the chance to uncover a bit of hidden history.

So here’s a perfectly timed question from Katelin in Northwood. She wrote:

“I heard Northwood had some kind of important link on the way we celebrate Thanksgiving. I looked but never found it. Any ideas?”

All over New Hampshire, towns are divided into even smaller communities; Barnstead contains Center Barnstead, Barnstead Parade, and South Barnstead. There’s Conway, North Conway and Center Conway. Chocorua, South Tamworth, Wonalancet, and Whittier - are all part of the town of Tamworth.

This prompted a listener to our Only in New Hampshire series to write in and ask ,why are so many towns split up this way?

NHPR’s Molly Donahue found the answer to that question with a visit to Grafton.

Listen to the story:

Natasha Haverty

This week on Foodstuffs, our weekly look at food and food culture around the region, NHPR's Natasha Haverty visits Payao's Thai Cookin', a food stand at the edge of the woods in Northwood, N.H.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

When you walk into Willows on South Main Street in downtown Concord, you are greeted by the vibrant purple walls and bright artwork that fills the dining room.

Willows opened up in April and its menu is entirely vegan and organic.

Sarah Thomas

Red Sox vs. Yankees. Coke vs. Pepsi. Facebook vs. Twitter.  And now – Chuckster’s Family Fun Park vs. Rocky Gorge 4 Seasons Golf Fairway.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Andover is home to the village of Potter Place, named after Richard Potter, a famous magician and ventriloquist.

And it’s in this village where the town’s Potter Place railroad station still stands.

The town’s historical society maintains the station.

It was located on the Northern Railroad, which ran from Boston, through White River Junction, and continued to Montreal.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Originally a toll road, New Hampshire’s first turnpike stretched 36 miles, from the Piscataqua Bridge in Durham to the Merrimack River in East Concord.

It was the first of more than 80 turnpikes built in the state by private corporations during the 19th century. 

As part of our occasional series, Marking History, NHPR’s Michael Brindley travels to Route 4 in Northwood, where there’s a historical marker paying tribute to the state’s transportation milestone. 

Google Earth: 2003

Since 2006 the Suncook River has been on a different course: it jumped its bank in the Mother’s Day flood, and the state has been trying to stabilize it ever since. Now as part of a recent fine for filling wetlands, a gravel company will give the project 8,000 tons of stone for the project. But this is only part of a continuing effort to live next to a changing river.