Pease International Tradeport

Pease AFB

A major defense spending package will not include two key regulations for toxic PFAS chemicals – which have polluted water across New Hampshire.

The National Defense Authorization Act, set for final votes this week, does carry other provisions that New Hampshire's congressional delegation supported, including a plan to give 12 weeks of paid parental leave to federal employees.

The spending plan also says the military must phase out use of PFAS-based firefighting foam, which has contaminated drinking water at hundreds of sites including the former Pease Air Force Base.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Federal researchers are now recruiting for a first-of-its-kind health study on PFAS chemical exposure in drinking water at Pease International Tradeport. 

Officials with the Centers for Disease Control gave an overview of what they're calling "the Pease study" in Portsmouth last night, with at least 150 residents in attendance.

CDC.gov Photo

Officials will cut the ribbon Tuesday on a major water treatment plant at Pease International Tradeport.

The new system will scrub PFAS chemicals out of the large aquifer that once supplied drinking water at the former Air Force base.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Some local officials are worried the state is moving too fast on new regulations to limit PFAS chemicals in drinking water.

USAF

The airports in Manchester and Portsmouth will receive a combined $18 million in federal funding for infrastructure improvements.

Most of that money will go to Pease International Tradeport for reconstruction of the airport’s two-mile-long main runway. That project has been in the works for years.

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People who say they were exposed to PFAS chemicals at what’s now Pease International Tradeport are suing a group of chemical companies.

The federal class-action suit was filed just days before New Hampshire sued the same companies and one other for statewide water contamination.

The suits name companies like 3M and DuPont, as well as makers of firefighting foams that contained PFAS.

Getty Images/NHPR

The CEO of Sig Sauer, one of the country’s largest gun makers with U.S. headquarters in New Hampshire, was in a German courtroom Tuesday for the start of a trial over his role in an alleged illegal international arms sale.

EPA

The Environmental Protection Agency says it will review the safety of four New Hampshire Superfund sites in 2019.

This year's reviews, which happen every five years at federally managed toxic waste sites, will include the former Pease Air Force Base and three old industrial sites and dumps in southern New Hampshire.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Federal researchers are getting ready to start a major health study of families who drank PFAS chemical-contaminated water at Pease International Tradeport.

The project will be a model for the Centers for Disease Control’s first-ever national health study on the effects of industrial PFAS chemicals.

But the study likely won’t include Portsmouth firefighters. Officials say the kind of exposure they and others like them have had to PFAS is too different from the study of PFAS in community drinking water.

Port City Air

A major settlement signed Friday will require Pease International Tradeport to clean up water pollution from its stormwater runoff.

The Pease Development Authority was sued more than two years ago by the Boston-based Conservation Law Foundation for federal Clean Water Act violations.

Getty Images/NHPR

High ranking members of the Colombian National Police found themselves in Exeter, N.H., in the spring of 2009. They were there to visit arms maker Sig Sauer, which had just secured a contract worth up to $306 million to provide Colombian law enforcement with nearly 100,000 pistols. 

WPS Geography

Business support for offshore wind is building in New Hampshire.

Governor Chris Sununu said Monday he'd requested a federal task force that would be a first step to development.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR News

Veterans and families who lived and worked at the former Pease Air Force Base want the government to begin collecting data about their disease rates and possible ties to chemical exposures on the installation.   

At a forum in an aircraft hangar Friday, dozens of people stood at a microphone and told an Air National Guard colonel about their health problems and their experiences at the base.

Screenshot via US Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee

The U.S. Senate held a major hearing on PFAS chemical contamination Wednesday, with testimony from a local advocate.

New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan, who sits on the Senate subcommittee that held the hearing, and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, who was a guest, questioned federal regulators for two hours.

They pushed for answers on the government's plans for more PFAS research, stricter standards and cleanup plans.

Cubbie_n_Vegas via Flickr

For the first time since the 1990s, Portsmouth International Airport at Pease will be served by two commuter airlines.

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New Hampshire's senators are joining an effort to hold the U.S. military more accountable for water contamination at sites like Pease International Tradeport.

The senators are co-sponsoring a bipartisan bill called the PFAS Accountability Act, along with Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, lead sponsor Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, and others.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A first-of-its-kind water treatment system has begun filtering high levels of toxic PFAS chemicals from the groundwater at Pease International Tradeport.

It’s the latest, biggest phase of millions of dollars in government response after PFAS was found in a drinking water well at Pease in 2014.


Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A first-of-its-kind water treatment system is up and running at Pease International Tradeport.

The plant uses a new regenerative resin process to scrub extremely high levels of PFAS chemicals out of the groundwater beneath a former military fire training area.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Englanders had a chance to speak out this week about what they want to see in new Environmental Protection Agency rules for industrial chemicals in drinking water – but residents say the proof that they were heard will be in what the regulators do next.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is joining a legislative bid to get a federal study on certain industrial chemicals released.

The Environmental Protection Agency has reportedly spent months blocking publication of the report, from an arm of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The study reportedly shows that PFAS chemicals may pose more risk to humans than the EPA has previously said.

EPA

The Environmental Protection Agency will develop new regulations on certain industrial chemicals in drinking water. The substances, called PFAS, have been a problem on New Hampshire's Seacoast and elsewhere.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said at a summit on PFAS in Washington on Tuesday that they’ll talk about the issue in Portsmouth next month.

New Hampshire environmental regulators joined officials from at least 30 other states and tribes at the summit.

Courtesy Revision Military

A military and tactical gear company says it will set up its United States headquarters at the Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth.

Jim Peaco / NPS

New Hampshire’s U.S. senators are criticizing the Trump administration for reportedly blocking the release of new data about chemicals called PFCs, which have raised contamination concerns in the state.

Emails obtained by Politico reportedly show White House and Environmental Protection Agency officials citing public relations fears in delaying publication of a PFC study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Air Force is announcing new efforts to address water contamination at the former Pease Air Force Base.

Pease is the site of the largest known perfluorochemical contamination in the state. In 2014, a drinking well was closed there after at least 1,800 people were exposed to PFCs at levels far above health advisory limits. Some evidence has linked PFCs to cancer.

US Navy

Governor Chris Sununu wants the former Pease Air Force base included in a first-ever national study on the health effects of toxic chemicals called PFCs.

Sununu wrote this week to the federal agency leading the study, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. It’s part of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

The latest federal defense spending bill authorizes the agency to spend $7 million to study the health impacts of perfluorinated chemicals, or PFCs.

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New Hampshire's Democratic congressional delegation is requesting that the Pease International Tradeport be included in a nationwide health impact study on chemicals such as PFOA found in drinking water.

Legislation authored by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Rep. Carol Shea-Porter establishing the study was signed into law by President Donald Trump last month.

The Pease Tradeport formerly served as an Air Force base. In 2014, the city of Portsmouth closed the Haven well at Pease after the Air Force found high chemical levels.

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People exposed to the chemicals known as PFCs at the former Pease Air Force base could soon be taking part in a new national health study.

A defense spending bill signed into law by President Trump on Tuesday included an amendment on PFCs backed by New Hampshire’s congressional delegation.

Seacoast lawmakers want to take steps to ensure that a chemical found in water near the Pease International Tradeport doesn't cause problems elsewhere.

The Portsmouth Herald reports that two bills proposed by Democratic state Rep. Mindi Messmer of Rye would add regulations and create limits for so-called PFCs detected in local drinking water.

PFCs are considered possible carcinogens and are found in household items like Teflon.

A judge on Tuesday ruled that a water pollution lawsuit against the Pease Development Authority can proceed.

The lawsuit is by the Conservation Law Foundation, or CLF, against the management of the Air-Force base turned business district at Pease.

At issue is storm water runoff. The CLF says the 3,000 acre property is discharging polluted rainwater into Great Bay without the proper permits from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Tom Irwin with CLF says it’s a problem that’s only gotten worse as development at Pease has continued.

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The Air Force says it will spend $30 million this year on cleaning up contaminated groundwater at a former New Hampshire base.

The groundwater at the former Pease Air Force Base has been found to be contaminated with perfluorinated compounds from the use of firefighting foam.

The chemicals are found in scores of everyday products like nonstick cookware and stain-resistant carpet. The Environmental Protection Agency says exposure has been linked in animal studies to low birth weight, accelerated puberty, cancer and thyroid problems, among other maladies.

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