municipalities

CEYHUN (JAY) ISIK / CREATIVE COMMONS

New state limits are now in effect for PFAS chemicals in public drinking water supplies.  The now-common industrial contaminants have been linked to health risks. 

New Hampshire's new standards are the nation’s strictest, and largely the first of their kind. 

Christiaan Colen; Flickr

The number of cyber attacks on municipalities is up from 2018, causing chaos and costing municipalities millions to resolve. We ask why local governments are being targeted, the impact on citizens, and the challenges for municipalities trying to protect themselves. 

Air date: Thursday, September 19, 2019, at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Some local officials are worried the state is moving too fast on new regulations to limit PFAS chemicals in drinking water.

FLORIANHUAG / FLICKR/CC

Public water system operators are worried about the cost of compliance with new state limits on PFAS chemicals in drinking water.

That was the message from lobbyists at a hearing on the proposals today in Concord.

The PFAS limits the state is proposing would require testing and treatment for the toxic chemicals at public water systems. The up-front cost could be at least $8 million total.

Britta Greene for NHPR

About twenty years ago, New Hampshire adopted a new option, known as SB2, for local government involving a two-part process: a deliberative session and ballot voting.  We ask how this has affected town governance, in terms of citizen participation, the issues that come up, and how they're resolved.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Advocates for more local control in New Hampshire are trying again to amend the state constitution, this time to let municipalities pass laws protecting people's health and the environment.

A dozen New Hampshire towns already have ordinances geared toward ensuring locals’ health, safety and welfare, sparked by big energy developments or water quality concerns.

But Granite State municipalities technically can’t enact any laws the state doesn’t allow them to. So supporters say those ordinances wouldn't hold up in court – which is why they need a constitutional amendment.

Tri-City Region Pools Resources To Reduce Costs

Apr 27, 2015
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Strafford_County,_New_Hampshire_Genealogy

The mayors of Dover, Somersworth and Rochester have created a commission to pool municipal resources. 

As cities go, these cities are on the small side, with populations from 12,000 to 30,000. Rochester Mayor T.J. Jean says he hopes together, the tri-city commission can find economies of scale through collective purchasing and other measures. 

"Each community is going to send two representatives to bring ideas and discuss ideas on how we might be able to work together so we aren’t all spending the same amount of money on the same things," he says.

A house bill that would consider giving the Public Utilities Commission authority to force PSNH to sell its power plants to open up market competition is getting vocal opposition from business leaders and mayors in the state.

Berlin Mayor Paul Grenier says the move will raise electric rates and scare businesses away from his community.

State regulators suggested the Local Government Center turn over control of its operation and assets to a neutral party.

The Securities Bureau Director says that’s the best way to address fundamental problems within the organization.

The Local Government Center, the group that provides insurance to cities and towns, faces four charges it violated state laws.

The Securities bureau alleges that LGC owes municipalities upwards of $100 million dollars.