Bernie Sanders | New Hampshire Public Radio

Bernie Sanders

  • U.S. Senator since 2007. Former U.S. Rep. (1991-2007).
  • Elected as Independent from Vermont.
  • 2016 N.H. Democratic Presidential Primary winner.
  • Age: 78
Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders announced today he is suspending his campaign for president. Sanders won the New Hampshire primary back in February. Joe Biden, now the presumptive Democratic nominee, came in fifth place. 

State Rep. Renny Cushing is a Democrat from Hampton. Cushing was one of Sanders' most prominent supporters here during primary season. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello to remember the legacy that Sanders’ campaign has left on the state.

Updated at 1:11 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his 2020 presidential campaign Wednesday, bowing to the commanding delegate lead former Vice President Joe Biden established.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said Wednesday that Wisconsin should postpone next week's scheduled primary election amid the coronavirus outbreak, even as the state's governor said he was turning to the National Guard to help staff polling places on April 7.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders will be the only two candidates on stage for the Democratic presidential debate Sunday night, March 15.

The CNN-Univision debate was relocated from Arizona to Washington, D.C., and it will not have an in-person audience due to growing concerns about the coronavirus.

Updated at 1:43 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is planning to stay in the 2020 Democratic presidential race despite another disappointing primary night.

Two weeks ago, Sanders was the unlikely front-runner for the nomination. Now former Vice President Joe Biden has consolidated support so rapidly, and won so many states, that Sanders is facing calls to drop out of the race.

But Sanders announced his intention to press on in a statement on Wednesday.

Screen capture - NBC debate in Nevada

Bernie Sanders may be the big target when Democratic presidential candidates debate tonight in South Carolina ahead of the Palmetto State's primary on Saturday.

The Vermont senator is coming off a victory in the Nevada caucuses, following his New Hampshire primary win

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The 2020 Democratic nomination is now Sen. Bernie Sanders' to lose.

The independent from Vermont ⁠— who is running as a Democrat and often speaks about the ills not just of Republicans, but also of Democrats ⁠— handily won the Nevada Democratic caucuses.

Updated at 8:48 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the Nevada caucuses, according to an Associated Press projection.

The win gives Sanders victories in two of the first three states to weigh in on the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. His other win was in New Hampshire, and he also ended in a near-tie atop the still-muddled Iowa caucuses.

Updated at 7:08 a.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has opened up a double-digit lead in the Democratic nominating contest, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Sanders has 31% support nationally, up 9 points since December, the last time the poll asked about Democratic voters' preferences.

Sam Evans-Brown/NHPR

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders scored his second consecutive win in the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary Tuesday, with 26 percent of the vote. For his supporters, the victory felt both familiar and new.

NHPR Staff

Four years ago, the dynamics of the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary were elemental. Voters were either in with establishment frontrunner Hillary Clinton, or they joined forces with the outsider, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. In the end, the “outs” had it: Sanders won in a landslide, sweeping every county in the state by double-digit margins.

This time, the map to victory in New Hampshire may be more complicated for Sanders and his wide array of competitors.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ closing argument in the New Hampshire Primary has been that, to defeat Donald Trump, Democrats need a candidate who can grow the base; someone who can bring out young voters and disaffected voters in historic numbers. In the final weekend before voting begins, that strategy was on full display.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

It's the final stretch before the first primary ballots will be cast in New Hampshire, and candidates are crisscrossing the state to make their final case to voters here. Bookmark this page for updates on what the candidates are up to in these final days, what Granite State voters are saying, and more.

Click here for Part 2 of our Primary Countdown Blog.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

When it comes to abortion rights support, there is little daylight between the Democrats running for president. That much became clear quickly at the ‘Our Rights, Our Courts’ forum in Concord Saturday sponsored by several abortion-rights groups including the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Jesse Costa/WBUR

Bernie Sanders has been making the pitch to voters this week that he stands the best chance of defeating President Donald Trump in the general election.

But as attacks heat up on the campaign trail, can the Independent Vermont senator unite a Democratic Party that he hasn’t always gotten along with?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In New Hampshire Thursday, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders declared victory – in the Iowa Caucuses.

“What I want to do today, three days late, is to thank the people of Iowa, for the strong victory they gave us at the Iowa Caucuses Monday night,” Sanders said during an afternoon press conference in Manchester.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Jason Moon/NHPR

After a day of confusion and incomplete information,  the two candidates who, at least for now, appear to have finished first and second in the Iowa Caucuses – Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Bernie Sanders – spoke to enthusiastic crowds Tuesday evening. Both of them claimed Iowa victories...in New Hampshire.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

At first, the scene at the Manchester field office for the Bernie Sanders campaign looked pretty typical: Volunteers milled around after a presentation from campaign higher-ups, fielding invitations to sign up for canvassing shifts from campaign staffers armed with clipboards.

But in one corner of the room, a smaller group huddled together, listening intently to field organizer Susmik Lama, who was delivering a parallel set of instructions for the final weeks of the campaign — in Nepali.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A lot of New Hampshire voters still have no idea who they’ll support in the presidential primary: recent polling indicates just 30 percent of likely Democratic voters here have made up their minds.

Some say they’re looking inward, and as they do, anger has become a major factor in their decision.

Jason Moon / NHPR

On a recent Saturday morning at a Bernie Sanders campaign office in Manchester, a group of about 20 volunteer canvassers received a pep talk from Nina Turner, a national co-chair for the Sanders campaign.

“Twitter is wonderful. Instagram is wonderful. Facebook, all of that social media stuff is wonderful. But we cannot win this election with that alone,” said Turner. "We need real people knocking on the doors of other real people and talking to them about what is at stake.”

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

President Trump’s impeachment proceedings have only been before the U.S. Senate for one day, but with four senators running for president, they are already affecting life on the ground in early voting states like New Hampshire.

NHPR

In an interview Sunday with NHPR, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders declined to elaborate on a dispute with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren that kicked off a broader debate this week over gender and electability. But Sanders did weigh in on the obstacles facing female candidates.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

In their effort to woo voters before next month’s primary, Democratic Presidential candidates have come out with an array of policy plans, including ones to revitalize the rural United States. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson has been looking at what these plans might mean for rural New Hampshire and talking to voters about their concerns.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

The Exchange sat down with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders on Sunday, Jan. 19, before a live audience to discuss the Senator's views on Medicare for All, gun policy, foreign policy and other issues on voters' minds this election cycle. 

Sanders, who won the 2016 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary by a large margin, finds himself in a close race for the 2020 contest. He was recently endorsed again by the SEA SEIU Local 1984, one of the largest labor unions in the Granite State. 

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

The Exchange sits down with Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont on Sunday, January 19, at 11 a.m. before a live audience to discuss health care, the environment, conflict in the Middle East and more.  Although he calls himself a Democratic Socialist, Sanders caucuses with Democrats and is running for president as a Democratic candidate. Among his top issues: Medicare for All, the Green New Deal,  cancelling student debt, and taking on the "billionaire class."   

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Washington's escalating conflict and crisis with Iran has become a central focus of the presidential race. Voters are expressing concern, and the Democratic candidates are talking about it on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

Three months after suffering a heart attack, Bernie Sanders is "fit and ready to serve as president," according to his campaign, which on Monday released letters from three doctors.

Sanders, 78, had a heart attack on Oct. 1. His cardiologist, Martin LeWinter of the University of Vermont, revealed in his letter that Sanders "did suffer modest heart muscle damage" but said he "has been doing very well since."

The fight over a new contract for the New Hampshire state employees' union crossed paths with the 2020 presidential race Friday in Concord.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders called for an end to the union's impasse with Gov. Chris Sununu. The State Employees Association wants a 4 percent wage increase over the next two years, as recommended by an independent fact-finder's report on the stalled contract negotiations. 

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Four years ago, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders started small in New Hampshire, but ended up winning the state's presidential primary big.

In the 2020 race, Sanders entered the Democratic primary as a top contender, and nothing - not the huge field, not other candidates adopting his key policy proposals, not even a heart attack - has changed that.


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