NHPR's The Exchange To End Production | New Hampshire Public Radio

NHPR's The Exchange To End Production

Jun 4, 2021

When Laura Knoy informed us a few weeks ago of her decision to step away from hosting The Exchange after 25 years, our immediate response was to sustain the show through searches for both a new executive producer and a new host.

With a little bit of time and reflection on our strategy, we’ve decided to take a different course.

The Exchange will end production at the end of this month. Following a development process involving creative staff from across the organization, later this summer we’ll reshape our weekday programming by shifting Morning Edition by an hour.

The Exchange has been NHPR's signature talk show for 25 years.
Credit NHPR Photo

Public radio’s signature news program will air from 6 to 10 a.m. Our live, local version of Morning Edition will be enriched in new ways, including more interviews and new segments incorporating the voices of the people of New Hampshire. (As part of that process, we’ll also be evaluating whether to continue the Weekly News Roundup in either its current format or in a revised form.)

In addition, NHPR will continue to host candidate debates and forums, and to offer platforms for elected officials, nonprofit leaders and advocates to connect with the public. This is a critical role The Exchange has filled, and NHPR will continue that commitment to keep you connected and informed.

Why are we doing this? Our strategy is to look to what the future holds while ensuring we remain a strong and sustainable organization.

By aligning our staffing with a strategy centered on growing audiences across all of our media platforms, we put ourselves on solid ground for the long term.

Our commitment to you and our state-wide community of listeners and supporters is to conduct our work of public service journalism with diligence and integrity. We’ll do that through the kind of careful listening and community mindedness that have been hallmarks of The Exchange for the past 25 years - and through the ingenuity and constant reinvention that have defined NHPR for the 40 years since its founding.

Because not changing is far more risky, when the environment in which we operate is changing so quickly.

Let me end on a note of praise and admiration for Laura Knoy, today’s Exchange producers and the long line of NHPR journalists who’ve brought the people of New Hampshire thousands of interviews and conversations on issues big and small.

Jim Schachter is NHPR's President & CEO
Credit NHPR

The Exchange has introduced us to authors and changemakers, given us ideas on what to read and see, made us more informed voters and so much more.

The program is a lasting part of NHPR’s heritage, and its DNA of engagement and empathy is deeply embedded in all we’ll do in the years ahead.

Stay tuned to NHPR, and keep an eye on our website, newsletters and mobile app to see your local journalism leaders’ ingenuity in action. As always, you can reach me at president@nhpr.org.

Sincerely,

Jim Schachter, NHPR's President & CEO