Josh Rogers | New Hampshire Public Radio

Josh Rogers

Senior Political Reporter and Editor

Josh has worked at NHPR since 2000 and serves as NHPR’s State House reporter. Before joining the staff, he lived in New York, where he worked for a number of different magazines.

Josh’s award winning reporting can be heard locally but also regularly airs on national broadcasts of NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Josh is also a frequent analyst on political talk shows in the state. He grew up in Concord, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Reed College.

Contact

Ways to Connect

Josh Rogers | NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says he’d prefer out-of-staters to stay home as New Hampshire begins to reopen parts of its economy.

But retail locations, including malls, opened in New Hampshire Monday, including along the Massachusetts border.

Sign up for NHPR's coronavirus newsletter to get the latest updates.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

Nursing homes remain at the center of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, as state health officials announced 19 new deaths from the illness at long-term care facilities Wednesday, the highest single day death count since the pandemic began.

Annie Ropeik/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu announced two new spending plans related to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic in New Hampshire on Monday: $40 million to be used by cities and towns to offset local costs associated with COVID-19, and a temporary pay raise for state first responders.

NHPR Staff

The state's community college system is seeking millions in federal COVID-19 aid.

Most of the money would be for tuition assistance. The community college system wants more than $29 million to help students pay for classes.

Chuck Ansell is the system’s chief financial officer. On Wednesday, he told members of the legislative committee advising Governor Sununu on COVID-19 aid that the state's community colleges are ready to help create a workforce relevant to local economic needs.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A week after a Superior Court judge rejected top Democratic lawmakers efforts to block Governor Sununu from spending COVID-19 aid without their approval, Democratic Executive Councilor Andru Volinsky is asking Sununu to share details of proposed coronavirus spending.

New Hampshire's $1.25 billion in federal coronavirus aid sits in the state treasury.

The New Hampshire State House
NHPR

The leader of the New Hampshire Senate said it’s too soon to make a decision on Gov. Chris Sununu’s proposal to retain business tax cuts scheduled to take effect in January, regardless of whether the state meets the revenue benchmarks required by law.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Two new COVID-19 clusters have been reported at New Hampshire nursing homes, as officials announced that long-term care facilities account for 60 percent of all coronavirus-related infections in the state. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by top Democratic lawmakers over federal COVID-19 funding. The suit challenged Gov. Chris Sununu's power to spend more than $1.25 billion without legislative review or approval.

(Scroll down for earlier coverage.)

In his 16-page opinion, Superior Court Judge David A. Anderson granted Sununu's motion to dismiss, writing that stopping or delaying the governor from distributing funds in the midst of a global pandemic would be contrary to the public interest.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu has formed a task force to advise him on a potential phased reopening of the state’s economy. The task force includes state economic and tourism officials, chamber of commerce members, a chief of police, and leaders of industry groups representing retail merchants, restaurants and hospitals, as well as several lawmakers.

Emily Quirk/NHPR

New Hampshire’s long-term care facilities continue to grapple with outbreaks of COVID-19, as state officials say newly revised testing standards should make it easier to identify coronavirus infections and act quickly before they spread.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As the number of coronavirus-related deaths at New Hampshire nursing homes continues to rise, state officials are instituting new policies they say will limit future infections at long-term care facilities, which have proven particularly vulnerable to COVID-19.

CDC

Another nursing home patient has died in New Hampshire due to COVID-19, the state health department confirmed Friday, as officials say they are working to provide more support for long-term care facilities that are struggling to keep infections from the novel coronavirus at bay.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu and State Epidemiologist Dr. Ben Chan said Thursday that recent data show restrictions designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus in New Hampshire are working, but they also acknowledged the limitations of any effort to predict the precise impact and timeline of the pandemic at a time when conditions are widely expected to worsen before they improve.

Crotched Mountain Foundation

State public health officials on Wednesday announced five new coronavirus deaths in New Hampshire, all of them tied to long-term care facilities. The new numbers made clear, for the first time, the extent to which New Hampshire nursing homes have borne the most severe impacts of the pandemic in the state.

Josh Rogers

Gov. Chris Sununu announced new measures Monday to slow the spread of the coronavirus in New Hampshire, as newly-released testing results reveal the toll the disease is taking on the state's healthcare workers.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

State lawmakers will be back in action for the first time in close to a month this week.

A key committee will meet electronically on Friday to accept the first of what is expected to be more than $1.25 billion in federal coronavirus aid.

Leaders of the joint fiscal committee plan to take whatever action they can to aid the flow of federal aid to New Hampshire. 

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/68751915@N05/6757875045/">401(k) 2012</a> / Flickr

Banks in New Hampshire and across the country began getting busy Friday, as businesses harmed by COVID-19 are lining up for a share of $350 billion worth of new federal loans.

Via Hanover Hill's Facebook page

At a press conference earlier this week, state officials acknowledged that they’re aware of cases of COVID-19 at a number of New Hampshire health facilities serving the elderly or medically fragile — but they have declined to identify those facilities, citing privacy concerns.

Click here to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire delivered to your inbox.  

The New Hampshire State House
NHPR

The New Hampshire Legislature has suspended full operations until at least May 4th, but a key panel of lawmakers is planning to meet remotely in two weeks in an effort to start addressing anticipated declines in state revenues due to the coronavirus pandemic.

NHPR staff

Gov. Chris Sununu issued an expansive stay-at-home order Thursday, requiring all New Hampshire residents except for those employed by “essential” businesses to stay put until at least May 4 to slow the spread of COVID-19.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Schools are closed. Restaurants and bars have been banned from serving customers on-site. Even the state-owned ski area at Cannon Mountain has gone dark. It's all part of the state's effort to limit the transmission of COVID-19.

But one aspect of life in New Hampshire goes on as usual: state liquor outlets.

Click here for all of our coronavirus coverage, including our live news blog, FAQs, and more

Michael Brindley/NHPR

 

Gov. Chris Sununu issued a series of orders Tuesday morning aimed at softening the financial blow for New Hampshire residents dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.  

Dan Tuohy

All New Hampshire public schools will be closed for three weeks, the most sweeping response yet by state officials to the spread of coronavirus. The order by Gov. Chris Sununu comes as the number of identified cases of COVID-19 in New Hampshire nearly doubled in the course of one day, from seven to 13.

Josh Rogers | NHPR

The state has identified the seventh person in New Hampshire who tested positive for the virus as an adult female resident of Rockingham County, according to a press release from the state Department of Health and Human Services sent Friday night.

Officials say that person was at the Manchester DMV office from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday of last week, and on Tuesday of this week.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu declared a state of emergency Friday in the state’s effort to deal with the coronavirus pandemic. As he did, Sununu argued that the current threat to public safety here is minor and the emergency declaration was merely a precautionary step.

Still, earlier in the day, state health officials sought authority to spend up to $15 million to pay for a broad range of expenses to bulk up New Hampshire’s response to the COVID-19 threat.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu is reminding town officials that it is their call when it comes to deciding whether to go forward with town meetings as New Hampshire deals with fallout from the coronavirus.

The advice comes as the state is ramping up efforts to address the coronavirus.

In a statement, Sununu said “individual comfort levels" should guide towns' thinking on postponing town meeting.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu says he’s directed state agencies to draw up plans on how to reduce spending as COVID-19 affects the economy.

Click here for all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage, including the latest updates, guidance, FAQs, and more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Sununu and Democrats in the New Hampshire Senate are each proposing changes to state law to address fallout from the new coronavirus disease COVID-19.

Click here for our live blog to get the latest updates about coronavirus in New Hampshire.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Town elections are taking place across New Hampshire, and local officials and voters are working to ward off COVID-19.

In Bow, where there is a contested selectboard race, morning turnout was brisk. Bottles of sanitizer stood at the ready; signs reminded people to minimize handshaking.

But for most voters this day appeared to be pretty much business as usual.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu says his opposition to the Affordable Care Act hasn't changed, but that it makes sense for New Hampshire to join a multi-state effort to defend the law from legal challenge.

Sununu has had a complicated relationship to the health care law often known as Obamacare. He described it as a failure and and celebrated efforts to repeal it. But he's also signed a reauthorization of Medicaid Expansion -- a provision of the law that's brought the state millions of dollars to pay for heath care.

Pages