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Bill To Outlaw Synthetic Drugs Is Met With Broad Support In Senate

Ryan Lessard
/
NHPR

  A bill that would outlaw synthetic drugs like spice and bath salts received strong support as it was introduced to the Senate Commerce Committee.

The bill is cosponsored by more than half the state senate. Lead author, Democratic Senator Molly Kelly, told colleagues she wants to make it harder to buy the drugs without criminalizing the substances overnight.

“We know, and people do know, in our state, that heroin is dangerous. They know that many other drugs are dangerous. But the confusion is: people do not know that synthetic drugs are dangerous.”

The bill would make the sale or possession of drugs like spice with compounds not covered by Federal law punishable by up to a $1,000 fine and convenience stores could face the loss of their liquor, food or lottery licenses.

Language meant to cover the constantly changing chemical compounds mirrors what many communities have included in their ordinances banning synthetic drugs.

Before becoming a reporter for NHPR, Ryan devoted many months interning with The Exchange team, helping to produce their daily talk show. He graduated from the University of New Hampshire in Manchester with a major in Politics and Society and a minor in Communication Arts. While in school, he also interned for a DC-based think tank. His interests include science fiction and international relations. Ryan is a life-long Manchester resident.
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