recovery

The Rochester City Council rejected a community petition on Tuesday to relocate a private drug recovery center.

The council said it doesn't have the legal authority to force a relocation unless the center is breaking the law or violating a zoning ordinance.

Sixty-five people have signed the petition. In it, community members say they’ve have seen an increase in drug activity in their neighborhood around the SOS Recovery Community Organization.

NHPR Staff

Frisbie Memorial Hospital is closing a recovery center in downtown Rochester.

In a statement, Chief Nursing Officer John Levitow says the decision will eliminate "redundancy of service" and allow the hospital to better target its resources. Rochester is also served by the SOS Recovery Center.

Levitow says the hospital will work to avoid any disruption in care as patients are sent elsewhere for services.

The Frisbie recovery center opened in the fall of 2016 as a partnership between Frisbie and the city to provide 24/7 substance use disorder support and treatment.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A group of recovery centers from all across New Hampshire met with top state officials on Wednesday to plead for more funding, saying the state has placed added demand on their organizations without offering any extra financial support. 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

The New Hampshire House of Representatives dealt a blow Thursday to one of Governor Chris Sununu’s key priorities on the opioid front, the Recovery Friendly Workplace initiative.

The effort aims to link the private sector to the drug crisis by helping businesses better attract and retain people in recovery.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Rhode Island has become the first state to sign on to a new drug recovery initiative that Governor Chris Sununu is promoting on the national scale.

Addiction in the Workplace

Feb 11, 2018
Pexels

In the midst of a drug crisis, New Hampshire is also dealing with a severe labor shortage.  So now, some employers and the state hope to creatively address where the two overlap, promoting so-called "recovery friendly workplaces".  We look at the practical, legal, and financial aspects of this. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As the state continues to grapple with a drug problem, top state lawmakers are hoping to get businesses to be a part of the solution.

Nashua OK's Funding for New Drug Recovery Coach

Dec 13, 2017

The Nashua Board of Aldermen Tuesday night approved funding for a citywide recovery coach for those battling drug addiction. But it wasn’t without a lengthy debate.

Nashua May Soon Hire City's First Drug Recovery Coach

Dec 12, 2017

Nashua may soon get a dedicated recovery coach assigned to help with residents battling addiction. This position is part of the city's Safe Stations program.

A new, national study has alarming predictions for New Hampshire. The report draws a strong connection between substance abuse and suicide, and says the Granite State will have among the country's highest suicide risks in the upcoming decade.  We get more details, also local reaction to this report, and ideas for mitigating this possibility.


FILE

On Friday businesses in New Hampshire will come together for a job fair in Portsmouth targeted at hiring people in the drug recovery community.

Six percent of babies born in New Hampshire have been exposed to opioids.

And the actual number may be higher at this point.

“We are one of the hardest hit areas,” says Dr. Alison Holmes, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth.

Mark Colomb; Wikimedia Commons

A recent anonymous $3 million donation to help pregnant women and their babies fight addiction highlights the challenges, and costs, of caring for this population. Mothers and their newborns face specific hurdles when it comes to addiction, and hospitals and care centers have struggled to adapt to meet those needs.  


Ajay Suresh / flickr/cc

Evidence is growing that certain medicines can ease cravings for drugs and alcohol and improve people's lives. And the medical community, backed by substantial federal funding, is promoting these drugs, calling them life-savers in many cases. But there are skeptics: Some who feel this approach merely replaces one addiction for another and others who fear this is just another profit-making venture of so-called "big pharma."


Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A substance abuse treatment facility in Franklin, Farnum North, has added 42 more inpatient beds. And with help from donations, the center can now start treating patients who lack insurance. 

 

An organization that runs recovery centers for people dealing with substance abuse is expanding its services across New Hampshire.

Hope for NH Recovery is opening a new community center in Derry on Friday. Another one is opening Monday, July 18, in Claremont, and a third is scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 2, in Berlin.

The public is welcome to attend all of these openings. Centers have opened in Concord, Manchester and Newport.

New Hampshire is in the midst of a drug epidemic. The state’s Medical Examiner’s office says drug-related deaths have risen to a record high of 300 in 2014. To combat the most addictive drugs, lawmakers will consider tripling funding for the Governor’s Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention, Treatment and Recovery.

Of those three things, recovery services are severely lacking in New Hampshire, compared to neighboring states.

LendingMemo / Flickr Creative Commons

Just many places across the country, the New Hampshire’s recover from the recession has been slow. Recently, though, many are pointing to signs of an upswing. Housing prices are going up, while foreclosures are going down.  Consumer confidence is better than it has been in a while, and unemployment is now at 5.1% - 11th best in the country. But all is not perfect:  many in the Granite State worry about high energy costs, the Affordable Care Act’s effect on business, and uneven progress in different regions of the state.

A Lackluster Forecast For N.H.'s Economic Recovery

Nov 13, 2013

Although New Hampshire's economy is recovering, the outlook for the next several years is lackluster.   That’s according to a new economic forecast released Wednesday by the New England Economic Partnership.   

Photo by 'Images of Money' via Flickr Creative Commons

New data from the New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority paints a mixed picture of the State’s housing market. 

288 New Hampshire homes slipped into foreclosure in January. That’s a 22-percent decrease from the prior month, but still well above pre-recession levels.

“It is not a case of 'bam', we wake up one morning and the foreclosure issue is gone,” said Jane Law with NH Housing. She said the market is showing signs of a slow recovery.