Rick Ganley

Host, Morning Edition

Rick joined NHPR as morning host in January 2009. He has a 20 year career in radio including on-air work at stations in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire in formats from rock to classical. He was co-owner of an FM station in Maine in the mid 90s. Rick spent the last ten years as Operations Manager and Morning Host of WPNH-FM, Plymouth NH and Production Director for Northeast Communications Corporations' five-station group. He also writes occasional pieces on media and music for the Hippo, Manchester's weekly paper, and voices radio and TV spots on a freelance basis.

Contact

Morning Edition Program Page

Ways to Connect

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The White House’s Election Integrity Commission met in Manchester Tuesday to discuss voter fraud in New Hampshire.

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen released a statement last week condemning President Trump's voting commission and talk of widespread voter fraud in last November’s elections.

Jeff Dell/Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/5wMPqa

The Keene City Council voted unanimously last week to put the permit for this year’s Pumpkin Festival on hold.

Organizers are planning for a scaled-down festival compared to previous years. But councilors are now expressing concern that they could see a repeat of the riots that broke out in 2014.

NHPR’s Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Councilor Janis Manwaring by phone on Monday.

The council granted a license for the festival back in June. What has changed since then?

National Hurricane Center - NOAA

Florida residents prepared for Hurricane Irma as it made its way across the Caribbean Islands Wednesday.

David True, a former, longtime resident of New Hampshire, moved from Portsmouth to Daytona, Florida in November of last year. He lives on a 40-foot aft cabin boat named Scallywag with Bella, his rescue German shepherd.

https://flic.kr/p/bp6atk
Keith Allison / Flickr

The New England Patriots will play its first game of the official season Thursday evening against the Kansas City Chiefs.

Chad Finn, sports reporter for the Boston Globe, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to give a preview of the game and the Patriots’ upcoming season.

You know I'm wondering what you think the prospects are for the Patriots and chiefs tonight.

Jonathan McIntosh / https://flic.kr/p/742Wx2

Nineteen Indonesian immigrants living in New Hampshire received deportation orders Tuesday after checking in at federal immigration offices in Manchester.

The immigrants are undocumented, but check in every month with ICE officials.

Maggie Fogarty, co-director of the New Hampshire program for the American Friends Service Committee, said ICE told the Indonesians to return next month with plane tickets showing a November departure.

Fogarty said immigrants who have been complying with regular check-ins are easy targets for deportation.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Students are returning to schools across New Hampshire this morning after the long holiday weekend.

For many families, this marks the second or even third week of school, with most communities starting the school year before Labor Day.

Governor Chris Sununu says he wants to see that change.

Animal Planet

North Woods Law: New Hampshire’ is back for another season.

The reality show follows a group of New Hampshire Fish & Game conservation officers in the line of duty; that includes everything from rescues in the White Mountains, to patrolling the seacoast.

The second season premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. on Animal Planet.

Col. Kevin Jordan from N.H. Fish & Game joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the show.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A public hearing will be held Wednesday in Concord to hear from residents on the proposed Northern Pass project, the next step in the state Site Evaluation Committee's review process.

The panel is expected to vote sometime later this year on whether to approve the $1.6 billion project.

If approved, the Northern Pass would run from Pittsburg to Deerfield, carrying hydroelectricity from Canada into southern New England.

The events that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month sparked a national dialogue about racial tensions in America.

It’s a conversation that's continuing in classrooms across the state, as another school year gets underway.

We asked four New Hampshire teachers how they’re planning to incorporate discussions about the violence that occurred in Charlottesville into their classrooms. We asked them to record themselves and send in their thoughts; here’s what we heard:

James Gaj, Nashua High School South

leafschoolnh.org

A new public charter school opens in Alstead on Tuesday.

The LEAF Charter School is a high school located in the Mole Hill Theater building. Its curriculum will focus on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math, or STEAM.

The first charter schools opened in New Hampshire in 2004. LEAF is the state’s 25th charter school.


Joshua Roberts/Reuters

It’s been just over two weeks since a group of white nationalists and neo-Nazis - including a man from Keene - marched with torches across the University of Virginia campus.

A 20-year-old woman was killed when a man drove his car into a group of counter protesters.

Now, as the school year gets underway this week, teachers in cities and towns across New Hampshire are preparing to talk with students about what happened in Charlottesville.

AP Photo/Matt York

 Earlier this week, NHPR featured the story of nearly two dozen undocumented Indonesian immigrants facing deportation, after having lived in the Dover area for two decades.

During a routine check-in with federal immigration officials earlier this month, they were told to purchase plane tickets, and make plans to leave the country in less than two months, or face detention.

It's a situation immigrant advocates say is playing out in communities across New Hampshire, as the Trump administration’s new, more aggressive immigration enforcement policy takes effect.

Flickr Creative Commons

People suffering from chronic pain can now get medical marijuana in New Hampshire, thanks to a law extending the treatment to cover new conditions that takes effect this week. Later in the month, people with post-traumatic stress disorder will also qualify.

Chronic pain is the most common reason why people seek out medical marijuana, according to a National Academies of Sciences report earlier this year. Add PTSD, and New Hampshire's medical marijuana market is looking at some major changes.

Michael Brindley

The vinyl resurgence is thriving in New Hampshire.

Do a quick Google search, and you’ll find there are nearly two dozen music stores across the Granite State carrying new or used records.

Across the globe, vinyl LP sales spiked by 53 percent last year, reaching the format’s highest point in 25 years.

To find out what’s behind this renewed interest in records, Morning Edition host Rick Ganley paid a visit recently to Thrifty’s Second Hand Stuff in Manchester.

Children in New Hampshire are finding themselves caught in the front lines of the state’s heroin and opioid crisis.

Last month, first responders had to use Narcan to revive a 6-year-old Manchester boy. And last week, a 9-year-old was left unattended at a Manchester Dunkin' Donuts when his father overdosed in the bathroom.

Courtesy photo

It’s been a busy summer for the Seacoast Science Center’s marine mammal rescue team.

There’s been a surge of late in the number of beached seals in need of rescue along New Hampshire’s coast.

Ashley Stokes manages the marine mammal rescue team, and she joined NHPR's Morning Edition.

Talk about what these past few weeks have been like for your team. What are you seeing?

CREDIT CREDIT MIKECOGH VIA FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

An attorney representing a group of female prisoners says he's considering reactivating a lawsuit against the state after further delays in the opening of a new women's prison in Concord.

The White House kicked off its Made in America Week on Monday with a showcase of locally-made products from each state.

There were well-known brands like Campbell’s Soup from New Jersey and Gibson Guitars from Tennessee.

And right there along with those bigger names was Cider Bellies Doughnuts. The Meredith-based company was chosen to represent the Granite State at the event.

Supporters of the Prescott Park Arts Festival say complaints about alcohol use at concerts this summer are overblown.

Police in Portsmouth say they plan to step up enforcement of the alcohol ban at the festival, after complaints were filed with the state attorney general's charitable trust unit.

Peter Biello

After spending two years as a foster parent, first-term state representative Sean Morrison is concerned about what he says is a lack of rights for foster families in the child protective services system.

The Epping Republican and his wife foster two children.

He is proposing legislation to create what he calls a foster parent bill of rights.

Capitol Center for the Arts

It’s been 23 years since the old Concord Theatre on South Main Street closed its doors for good, but there’s a renewed effort to bring it back to life.

The theater opened in 1933, but has sat vacant for years. It’s likely many who pass by the building are unaware of the history inside.

Courtesy

Aerosmith has been going strong for decades, but the legendary rock band actually traces its roots back to New Hampshire.

Lead singer Steven Tyler and guitarist Joe Perry met in Sunapee, where they spent their childhood summers, and the rest is rock history.

On Saturday, the Sunapee Historical Society will be transformed into a shrine of sorts for the band when it hosts Aerosmith History Day.

Memorabilia spanning the band’s nearly 50-year career will be on display.

More than five decades after establishing the first state lottery, New Hampshire is for the first time dedicating a portion of lottery profits toward treatment for gambling addiction.

Several organizations are coming together to address what they say has been an abrupt and sharp decline in basic historical knowledge among New Hampshire students.

New Hampshire Historical Society president Bill Dunlap sounded the alarm in an op-ed earlier this month, saying this knowledge deficit could have dramatic consequences for the state.

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she’s troubled by a report that one of President Trump’s sons met last year with a Russian attorney who promised to provide damaging information about Hillary Clinton.

Shaheen called the report “very troubling.”

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Two New Hampshire lawmakers from different sides of the aisle are asking a judge to block the Secretary of State from handing over voter information to President Trump’s election integrity commission.

Monika McGillicuddy

 Boston Harbor will host more than 50 tall ships this weekend, bringing thousands of tourists to the area.

But in a break from tradition, there will be no such display of the historic vessels along the Piscataqua River in Portsmouth later this summer.

Organizers of Sail Portsmouth say they’ve had to cancel this year’s tall ships festival due to contractual issues with the event in Boston.

Chad Chadwick is chair of the Piscataqua Maritime Commission, which organizes Sail Portsmouth. He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition.

Chris Jensen

The supervisor of the White Mountain National Forest is stepping down.

Tom Wagner announced this week that he’s retiring at the beginning of September. He’s served in the role for 15 years, overseeing 800,000 acres of forest in New Hampshire and western Maine.

AR MCLIN / FLICKR

The chief of police of New Hampshire’s largest city is urging people not to give money to panhandlers.

Manchester Police Chief Nick Willard wrote an open letter to the community last week titled "Panhandling - A Community Issue," and it’s stirred a lot of debate.

In the letter, Willard acknowledges panhandlers are within their rights to ask for money, but added that there’s no way to know if they will use it to buy drugs or alcohol.

Michael Brindley

The weather’s heating up, which means farmers markets are opening for the season across New Hampshire.

One of the state’s largest communities has been without a farmers market since 2015, when the market in downtown Derry folded.

A group of community leaders has been working for more than a year to resurrect it.

The new version – rebranded as the Derry Homegrown Farm and Artisan Market – debuted on Wednesday, and will run each Wednesday through the summer from 3-7 p.m.

Pages