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The Exchange
Final results: Summary results | Town resultsThe BasicsThe New Hampshire primary is a mainstay in American electoral politics. Every four years, voters gather to help determine the Republican and/or Democratic nominee for President. While the state only has 12 electoral votes in 2012 (normally it’s 24, but the Republican National Committee penalized the state party for moving up the event date), the primary’s position as one of the earliest contests gives the state out-sized influence over the nomination process.Only the Iowa caucuses come before New Hampshire’s primary. Traditionally, New Hampshire’s broad-based primary contest has been seen as a counter-weight to Iowa’s more drawn-out caucus process, which tends to draw a smaller core of party faithful. In the case of the 2012 Republican race, New Hampshire’s electorate is seen to represent the more libertarian-leaning, fiscally conservative wing of the party, while Iowa voters are seen as representing the socially conservative wing of the GOP base.N.H. Primary summary provided by StateImpact - NH reporter, Amanda Loder

The No-Votes

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A new survey shows as many as ninety million Americans are likely to sit out this election.  They cite a number of reasons from “I’m too busy” to “my vote doesn’t matter”.  But in a tight election, these voters could have a profound impact on the outcome.  We’ll look closer at this group, why they feel the way they do, and the implications for our democracy.

Guests

David Paleologos - Director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center, which conducted the Unlikely/Unregistered Voter Poll with USA Today.

Jan Leighley - Professor in the Department of Government at American University. Her research and teaching interests include voter turnout, American political behavior, and media and politics. Her books include Strength in Numbers? The Political Mobilization of Racial and Ethnic Minorities.  

Click here to read the Unlikely/Unregistered Voter Poll

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