special education

Courtesy of the Solo Group

 

Parents in Nashua are voicing concerns over a decision by the school district to bus students offsite for special education services.  

Districts in New Hampshire are required to oversee and pay for services for students with special education plans, known as IEP's, even when that student starts going to a public charter school.

What distinguishes a learning disability, and what accomodations are available? How do schools, teachers, and students approach learning disabilities, and how have philosophies and strategies changed? What are the challenges students and their educators and parents continue to face?

This show originally aired on August 5, 2019. 

Michael Brindley for NHPR

 

The U.S. Department of Education is allowing New Hampshire to keep $10 million in unspent federal special education funds - called IDEA grants - but, it is requiring the N.H. education department to adjust how it sends these funds to towns in the future.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

For schools across New Hampshire, special education is a growing need and a growing cost. Nowhere is that more apparent than in Manchester, the state’s largest district, where special ed expenditures have nearly tripled in the last twenty years.  

Special Education Funding In The Granite State

Feb 18, 2019

After news that New Hampshire had over $10 million in unspent federal funds for special education over the last ten years, we take a look at the dynamic balance of allocating resources for special education in the state, including changing student needs, workforce shortages, and the challenge of predicting and adapting to the ever-evolving student population within a school and within a district. We also look at why special education programs can vary widely with regards to resources across the state, and how that impacts students and educators. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Department of Education is hoping to repurpose $10 million in unspent federal funds earmarked for special education.

An Update On Special Education In New Hampshire

Nov 27, 2017

New models for education seek to provide resources and access to services for not just students with special needs (such as intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities), but for any student who may be marginalized in their  community. This may include students who speak English as a second language, and students living in poverty. But individual schools and school districts still struggle to meet their students' needs, through workforce shortages, funding limitations, or exhaustive performance requirements. 


dcJohn / Flickr / Creative Commons

Physically restraining or secluding children at school is generally considered a last resort for educators, to keep the classroom safe. But recent reporting has revealed that these techniques are used more frequently than you might expect, and kids with disabilities are disproportionately affected. We dive into the discussion on when it is and isn’t appropriate to restrain kids in school.

Courtesy: Mel Pepin

Meet Declan Alexander Rourke, an AT/RT cancer survivor.

Soon he’s visiting Disneyland, and is super pumped about a Star Wars attraction, where he will get to fight Darth Maul.

“I am not sure if Maul is going to have a single bladed light-saber, or a double, because in the Clone Wars, he has a single… Episode One… double,” he effuses, slapping his hand on the table for emphasis.

As schools continue to mainstream children with disabilities, students with emotional and behavioral disabilities  may be the toughest to include.  They’re less likely to graduate and more likely to get arrested.  And there are questions about how to approach these kids – whether it’s a matter of more discipline or alternative methods.  We look at this issue and discuss a new documentary that takes a look at the topic through the life of a high school student coping with these disabilities.  

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