Second Greatest Show on Earth | New Hampshire Public Radio

Second Greatest Show on Earth

Tall Trees Hemp

In New Hampshire, possession of small amounts of cannabis was decriminalized in 2017.

But for those who already have possession charges, getting their record cleared might not be so easy.

NHPR Staff

In July of 2019, Marissa Balonon-Rosen was at a crossroads in her life. She’d just graduated from law school on her way toward fulfilling her dream of becoming a public defender.   

She had her whole life set up post law school. She’d landed her dream job in New Hampshire. She had an apartment all lined up in Manchester. The only thing standing in her way was a 16 hour exam, spread across two days: the bar exam. 

Justine Paradis

When Courtney Marshall asked us why it’s so hard for black women to find a decent haircut in New Hampshire, we invited her to join us to find the answer. The resulting story won a regional Edward R. Murrow award.

Two years later, we’re revisiting Courtney’s question to see if anything has changed, both for her and in the state.

You Asked, We Answered: Are Teenagers in N.H. Learning About Consent in Sex Ed?

Feb 19, 2020
Jimmy Gutierrez

Regardless of their formal sex education, teenagers at the beginning of their social and romantic lives often turn to each other for information. In the second episode of The Second Greatest Show on Earth’s series on sex ed in New Hampshire, we hear directly from teens about how they are navigating consent, porn, masculinity, and femininity.  

This is the second episode in our two-part series on sex education. Listen to the first installment here.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As the country engages in conversations around sex, consent, and masculinity, The Second Greatest Show on Earth investigates questions about sex education in New Hampshire.

You Asked, We Answered: How Do N.H. School Boards Work?

Jan 10, 2020
Sara Ernst / NHPR

In New Hampshire, School Board members are usually people we recognize: our friends, family members, neighbors. On a basic level, they make decisions on behalf of the school. But how much power do they actually have?

This story was produced for audio so we encourage you to listen!

 

What does a school board do? 

Justine Paradis

In fewer than three hundred years, New England moved on from witch trials and executions and became a place where people openly call themselves witches.

But there are many ways to practice modern magic.

This is the second episode of The Real Witches of New Hampshire, a collaboration with New Hampshire Humanities.

Sara Plourde

Decades before the Salem witch trials, two women were accused of witchcraft in New Hampshire. Jane Walford and Eunice Cole stood trial in the same year, within just a few miles of each other, but their lives ended quite differently. The fates of these women might provide insight into what a historical witch actually was, and why some survived their trials while others did not. 

 

This is first episode of "The Real Witches of New Hampshire," a three-part series and collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and New Hampshire Humanities.