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pharmaceuticals

Ali Oshinskie for NHPR

New Hampshire is joining with every other state in the country in an effort to expand an already massive lawsuit against more than two dozen generic drug manufacturers

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Allegations in a lawsuit filed by 44 states against major generic drug manufacturers were unsealed this week.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong, who is taking the lead on the case, says the newly released emails from drug company executives show an industry-wide price fixing scheme.

“The American people and people across Connecticut need to see how far these companies have gone to literally steal money from all of us by charging us prices that were artificially high, prices they refer to as ‘fluff’ pricing."

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Senate Democrats are urging Governor Chris Sununu and Attorney General Gordon MacDonald to join 44 other states in a lawsuit against makers of generic drugs.

The lawsuit, which could be the largest of its kind in American history, alleges that makers of generic drugs have been conspiring for years to artificially inflate prices.

New Hampshire is one of just six states that hasn't signed on to the suit, though the state did join an earlier lawsuit that came out of the same investigation.

NHPR Photo

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office says it is still deciding whether to join a lawsuit filed by 44 other states alleging a massive price-fixing scheme by generic drug makers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen has introduced a bill that would prohibit pharmaceutical companies from claiming tax deductions for consumer advertising expenses.

Under current law, drug manufacturers are allowed to deduct the cost of advertising expenses from federal taxes.  A news release from Shaheen's office Thursday said those advertising expenses have more than quadrupled over the past two decades, rising from $1.3 billion in 1997 to $6 billion in 2016.

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New Hampshire will receive a little over $70,000 as part of a multi-state settlement with a pharmaceutical company accused of off-label marketing and kickbacks for two of its cancer drugs, the attorney general’s office announced Friday.

New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan is asking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to accelerate its consideration of competing products to the EpiPen after a big increase in cost for the allergy treatment.

Hassan sent a letter to the FDA on Monday asking it to accelerate its review and work to ensure that safe and affordable generic versions of the treatment are able to come to market "as quickly as possible."

Sharon Morrow

Terminally ill patients in New Hampshire may soon have the right to request experimental drugs that haven’t gotten federal approval.

Supporters of the so-called “Right to Try” bill say it give patients with only months to live a way to go around the FDA approval process in the hopes of getting potentially life-saving drugs.

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As part of the Affordable Care Act, pharmaceutical company payments to doctors will become public information starting in 2014. But a slice of those disclosures is already available, and the impact of transparency is being felt across New Hampshire.

In the last four years, New Hampshire doctors and nurse practitioners have taken in $5.8 million in money from drug companies.

But in 2012, for the highest earning doctors, there was a noticeable decline. In fact, every one of the top 10 recipients in the state saw his or her total compensation go down or hold flat last year.

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Dawn McIlvaom Stahl / Flickr Creative Commons

Today the US Supreme Court heard arguments related to the case of a New Hampshire woman seriously injured after taking a generic drug