Impeachment Coverage

Credit Via NPR

As Congress conducts public hearings as part of the impeachment process of President Trump, NHPR and NPR are covering the story on air, online, and on demand.

Bookmark this page as a resource for special broadcasts, programs, podcasts, and features relating to this historic story.

Related links:

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has released a report that outlines the findings from public hearings and closed-door interviews conducted by impeachment investigators since late September.

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

As the House impeachment inquiry moves this week from the fact-gathering stage in the Intelligence Committee to considerations of law in the Judiciary Committee, the White House says President Trump does not intend to participate in a Wednesday hearing.

House Democrats are moving closer to impeaching President Trump with two big developments this week — the release of the House Intelligence Committee's report summarizing their investigation and the Judiciary Committee holding its first hearing.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee is set to take the baton in Democrats' impeachment inquiry next week at a public hearing scheduled for Dec. 4.

Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., announced the hearing on Tuesday and notified President Trump that he has a few days to respond as to whether the president or his team will participate in the new stage of the process.

House impeachment investigators have released the transcript of the deposition of Mark Sandy, a career staffer for the White House Office of Management and Budget.

Sandy was deposed by lawmakers on Nov. 16 and was the lone person from the OMB to testify. Top-ranking political appointees to the OMB — including Russell Vought, its acting director — refused to comply with the investigation's requests, citing advice from the White House counsel's office.

After two weeks of public hearings, the House impeachment inquiry into President Trump is approaching its next stage: lawmakers are now writing a report that could lead to articles of impeachment.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., made the rounds on Sunday television programs outlining the case for impeachment without outright saying whether Trump will be the third president in United States history to be impeached.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

For people who pay close attention to politics, this is an unusually busy moment. Two weeks of impeachment hearings in Washington, combined with the crowded field of presidential candidates in the first-in-the-nation primary, is leaving some overwhelmed -- or just plain tuckered out -- in New Hampshire right now. 

About 100 pages of newly released State Department documents show Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani had at least two phone conversations in the weeks before a U.S. ambassador in Ukraine was removed from her post.

Additionally, the files show a White House aide played a role in connecting Giuliani's team with officials at the State Department so that Giuliani could get on Pompeo's official call schedule in late March.

Two witnesses testified during the last scheduled day of public impeachment hearings on Thursday. Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council official, and David Holmes, a political counselor in the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, spoke in front of the House Intelligence Committee — wrapping up two weeks of public and closed-door testimonies to Congress about President Trump's actions in the Ukraine affair. Click the audio link to listen to a special broadcast of NPR hosts and reporters offering analysis on the significant moments of the day.

All week, we've heard public testimony from US diplomats and government staff about allegations that President Trump was using military aid to Ukraine to leverage an investigation into his political opponents. We want to hear your thoughts - what stood out to you, and what are your questions?

Original air date: Friday, November 22, 2019

Two more witnesses testify Thursday morning in front of the House Intelligence Committee, marking the end of this week's public impeachment hearings.

Fiona Hill, the former Russia director for the National Security Council, and David Holmes, a U.S. diplomat from the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv, are appearing before investigators.

Over the past three days, lawmakers have spent hours questioning a total of nine U.S. officials (including Hill and Holmes).

No additional hearings have been announced by the Intelligence Committee.

Fiona Hill

House

Hearings into articles of impeachment against President Trump are continuing with the House Judiciary Committee following up on work completed by the Intelligence Committee. The full House is debating and voting on the articles on Dec. 18. NHPR will have special on-air coverage throughout. 

A career diplomat who overheard a U.S. ambassador's phone chat with President Trump this summer in which Trump allegedly referred to "investigations" to be carried out by Ukrainian officials is set to testify in the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry Thursday.

David Holmes, a senior staffer at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, is expected to expound on testimony he gave to lawmakers last week behind closed doors.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Fiona Hill, who served as the top Russia expert on the National Security Council before resigning last summer, criticized Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee for advancing theories that Ukraine, and not Russia, interfered with the 2016 presidential election.

Testifying on the third and final day of impeachment hearings before the panel this week, Hill said, "I would ask that you please not promote politically driven falsehoods that so clearly advance Russian interests."

President Trump, Vice President Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and much of officialdom was "in the loop" throughout the Ukraine affair, a key witness told Congress on Wednesday in watershed testimony.

Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, rejected the idea that he was part of any back channel or shadow effort.

He said he conferred with the State Department and the National Security Council all this year as he and other envoys worked to try to get concessions for Trump from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Updated at 7:08 p.m. ET

Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, tied President Trump directly to conditioning a meeting with the Ukrainian president with "a public statement from President Zelenskiy committing to investigations of Burisma and the 2016 election."

Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, who has emerged as the impeachment inquiry's most pivotal witness, is set to make a much-anticipated appearance before House investigators on Wednesday.

Sondland will face lawmakers who have many questions about conversations he had with President Trump about U.S. aid to Ukraine — and why his story changed since he first appeared before them in a closed-door session last month.

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Four witnesses are testifying in front of the House Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, starting the second week of public hearings in the ongoing impeachment inquiry investigation.

The morning session features Jennifer Williams, a career State Department staffer detailed to work with Vice President Pence's staff, as well as Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the Ukraine specialist on the National Security Council. Former U.S. envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker and former Russia director for the NSC Tim Morrison are testifying in the afternoon.

House committees have released the transcript of David Hale's testimony before the impeachment inquiry.

Hale, the under secretary of state for political affairs, is the third-highest-ranked official at the State Department. He allegedly knew about the White House's push to recall Marie Yovanovitch from her post as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine.

Updated Monday at 9:35 a.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a stern warning for President Trump on Sunday: Do not try to retaliate against the intelligence community official whose anonymous complaint helped spur the impeachment inquiry.

Tune in at 9 a.m. on Friday, November 22, for a special program from NHPR, “The Exchange Impeachment Special: New Hampshire Reacts.” Peter Biello will host the program, with a panel of political analysts responding to this week’s developments around the ongoing public impeachment hearings on Capitol Hill. The program will also be broadcast on Facebook Live. 

Guests for the program will include:

Updated at 5:11 p.m. ET

President Trump said Monday that he will "strongly consider" providing written testimony to House impeachment investigators. The president's surprise announcement comes a day after top Democrats invited him to defend himself in the face of accusations that he committed bribery by allegedly using foreign policy as a way to help his 2020 reelection bid.

House Intelligence Committee video

U.S. State Department officials were informed that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy was feeling pressure from the Trump administration to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden even before the July phone call that has led to impeachment hearings in Washington, two people with knowledge of the matter told The Associated Press.

New Hampshire Public Radio will be carrying special coverage this week of the public impeachment hearings from Capitol Hill and related programming from NPR. NHPR will carry the hearings in their entirety, available on-air and streaming through nhpr.org.

For all things related to the impeachment proceedings, visit nhpr.org/impeachment for stories and interviews from both NHPR and NPR.

Updated on November 18 at 4:30 p.m. ET

The House impeachment inquiry begins its second week of public hearings with the Intelligence Committee scheduled to hear testimony from nine more witnesses over three days.

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The U.S. House Intelligence Committee is holding open hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch is scheduled to testify at 9 a.m. Friday.

William B. Taylor, acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, and George P. Kent, senior State Department official in charge of Ukraine policy, testified Wednesday.

A U.S. appeals court opened the door for Congress to gain access to eight years of President Trump's tax records, setting the stage for a likely review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The full U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit declined to revisit an earlier ruling by a three-judge panel that allowed Congress to subpoena the president's tax records. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed those records in March.

Two witnesses seen as crucial to the case against President Trump in the impeachment inquiry testified Wednesday.

Much of what was said by acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor and George Kent, the State Department's top official on Ukraine policy, was previously known from their lengthy depositions released last week.

But there were some new things — and several moments that stood out. Here are seven:

1. A new detail from a new witness emerges

Congress begins public hearings as part of the impeachment process of President Trump, following a whistleblower complaint into use of presidential authority to pressure the Ukranian government to  investigate Trump's Democratic opponents. What can past presidential impeachment inquiries tell us about the process, and what should we expect going forward? 

Don't miss Civics 101's "Extra Credit" on presidential impeachments, and listen to their episode on impeachment.  Read on for highlights from this conversation. 

Original air date: Wednesday, November 13, 2019. 

Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

A State Department staffer overheard President Trump asking a top diplomat about "investigations" he wanted Ukraine to pursue that he believed might help him in the 2020 election, another senior diplomat told Congress.

That staffer is expected to tell his story directly to House investigators at a closed-door deposition on Friday.

The new subplot about the overheard phone conversation was one of a small number of new details to emerge from Democrats' first open hearing in their impeachment inquiry into Trump on Wednesday.

Pages