Impeachment Coverage

Credit Via NPR

As Congress conducts public hearings as part of the impeachment process of President Trump, NHPR and NPR are covering the story on air, online, and on demand.

Bookmark this page as a resource for special broadcasts, programs, podcasts, and features relating to this historic story.

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Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

A federal watchdog concluded that President Trump broke the law when he froze assistance funds for Ukraine last year, according to a report unveiled on Thursday.

The White House has said that it believed Trump was acting within his legal authority.

Updated at 10:18 p.m. ET

A lawyer for former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch is calling for an investigation after materials released Tuesday night as part of the impeachment inquiry suggested she was under surveillance by individuals linked to President Trump's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani.

Updated on Jan. 22 at 1:54 p.m. ET

The seven legislators who will act as the prosecution team presenting the House Democrats' case in the Senate trial make up a diverse group with a common link: strong legal backgrounds.

"The emphasis is on litigators. The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said of the team that is a mix of some familiar faces from the House inquiry and some lesser-known members.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The House of Representatives is taking the formal step of voting to transmit the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, which will hold a trial. The House voted to impeach Trump last month on two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

After the House vote to transmit, the articles are physically brought to the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said that the trial will likely start Tuesday. 

NPR / screen capture

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this morning is announcing who will present the case for President Donald Trump's impeachment in the Senate trial.

Watch the press conference live at approximately 10 a.m.

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Last month, the House of Representatives voted for only the third time in history to impeach the president. Then something else unusual happened:

Nothing.

President Trump, members of Congress, much of Washington and millions of Americans effectively pushed pause on a once-in-a-generation political saga to take off for the holidays.

So for those just tuning back in for the first full workweek of 2020, nothing substantive has changed in the story — but that also means the coming month may churn into a whirlwind.

Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski told a local television affiliate that she's "disturbed" by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's plans to use "total coordination" with the White House to set out President Trump's impeachment trial.

With the House impeachment of President Trump, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says it's now up to the Senate to adjudicate the matter. "We're ready to sit there and have the trial the Constitution requires," McConnell told Fox News on Monday.

But there's still no date set for such a trial, and McConnell is blaming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who has yet to forward to the Senate the two articles of impeachment.

It wasn't that long ago that House Democrats didn't know who would lead them.

They were warring over the speaker's post just days after the 2018 midterm elections handed them back the majority.

But Nancy Pelosi was certain of her fate.

"I intend to win the speakership with Democratic votes," Pelosi told reporters soon after the November elections. "I happen to think at this point, I'm the best person for that."

Impeachment is the ultimate form of censure, a permanent mark on a president. But there's little indication that President Trump has been chastened by last week's impeachment vote. In fact, it's quite the opposite. Trump is leaning in, attacking political opponents in deeply personal terms and setting records for rally length and the sheer volume of his tweets.

"I think it's the new 'not normal' that we're in right now," said Doug Heye, a former House Republican leadership aide.

Party leaders in Congress continued to spar Monday over details of an impending impeachment trial in the Senate, with newly released emails giving more ammunition to Democrats in their requests for new witnesses.

President Trump has often surrounded himself with lawyers whom he sees as being good on television. But Pat Cipollone, the attorney who will play a leading role in Trump's Senate impeachment trial defense, is better known for working behind the scenes.

Updated at 12:03 p.m. ET Thursday

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she plans to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate once she has more information about the contours of a Senate trial.

"We would like to see a fair process and we will be ready for whatever it is," Pelosi said Thursday, making it clear it was a matter of time.

Updated at 9:27 p.m. ET

House lawmakers voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday in only the third such rebuke in American history.

The move triggers a trial for Trump in the Senate, expected in January — one in which majority Republicans are likely to permit him to retain his office.

The vote was 230 to 197 on the first of two articles of impeachment — abuse of power — with one member voting present. The House then passed the second article — obstruction of Congress — with a vote of 229 to 198, with one member voting present.

House.gov

The House of Representatives is debating impeachment articles against President Trump before an expected vote early this evening. 

NHPR is airing special coverage of the House session. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

People in New Hampshire and hundreds of communities around the country held rallies Tuesday night in support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

The House of Representatives is expected to approve articles of impeachment Wednesday. The Senate would then act as jurors for a trial.

Mike Mackey from Newfields stood in the snow in Portsmouth’s Market Square with a sign that read “Save Our Democracy.” He said he hopes members of Congress will successfully impeach and remove the president.

NHPR is broadcasting live coverage of Wednesday's historic impeachment vote - you can hear that on our broadcast airwaves, or on our livestream player right here.

But if you'd rather listen to regularly scheduled programming from NHPR, we've got you covered. Click here to listen our special livestream.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Last week the House Judiciary Committee voted along party lines to approve two articles of impeachment against President Trump: one for abuse of power, the other for obstruction of Congress.

New Hampshire Congressman Chris Pappas, a Democrat representing the 1st Congressional District, announced Sunday that he will vote for both articles of impeachment. 

Speaking on NHPR's The Exchange earlier today, Pappas said he takes his oath of office seriously, and wanted to take plenty of time to get acclimated with the details of this case before making his decision. 

The House Judiciary Committee unveiled its report on President Trump's impeachment late Sunday, one that combines the views of majority Democrats and minority Republicans.

Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said the release of the report summarizing the cases for and against action was "customary" and followed the practices of the committee in the administrations of former Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

Updated at 10:01 a.m. ET

The House is poised to impeach President Trump — thus making him the third president to go down in the history books with a majority of representatives voting that he is guilty of "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors" as set out in the Constitution.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

Democrats are on track to impeach the president by the end of next week. After more than 14 hours of debate Thursday, the House Judiciary Committee approved impeachment articles against President Trump on Friday morning.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

WBUR has released a poll showing South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg leading the pack in the New Hampshire primary race.

The poll also looked at how New Hampshire primary voters, both Democrat and Republican, feel about topics like immigration and impeachment.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The House Judiciary Committee voted along party-lines today to approve two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Each vote was 23 to 17. The charges head now to the full U.S. House of Representatives for a vote next week.

Updated at 11:43 a.m. ET

House Democrats announced Tuesday that they will bring two articles of impeachment against President Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

"President Trump has acted in a manner contrary to his trust as President and subversive of constitutional government, to the great prejudice of the cause of law and justice, and to the manifest injury of the people of the United States," the resolution reads.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

House Judiciary

The House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing today on the President Donald Trump impeachment inquiry report, as the committee moves forward with drafting articles of impeachment 

Watch the hearing live via this video stream:

Updated at 6:51 p.m. ET

Democrats in the House took the next step toward impeachment on Monday with the presentation of what they call the evidence of President Trump's improper conduct in the Ukraine affair.

"President Trump's persistent and continuing effort to coerce a foreign country to help him cheat to win an election is a clear and present danger to our free and fair elections and to our national security," said Daniel Goldman, the Democratic staff counsel who presented the Democrats' case in the Judiciary Committee hearing.

With Democrats in the House of Representatives formally moving to draft articles of impeachment against President Trump, the top Republican on the committee that will author those articles is saying the White House should participate in the impeachment inquiry. But participation should happen only, he says, "when there is an actual opportunity in which it is a situation in which they can present, do the presentation that they need to."

Updated at 12:43 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced Thursday morning that House Democrats will move ahead with drafting articles of impeachment against President Trump, though she did not define the scope of those articles.

"His wrongdoing strikes at the very heart of our Constitution," Pelosi said, referring to Trump's efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate political rivals while hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid were on hold earlier this year.

U.S. House

The House Judiciary Committee holds its first hearing today in the Donald Trump impeachment inquiry, focused on constitutional grounds for impeachment.

The Judiciary Committee is tasked with drafting potential articles of impeachment against President Trump. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. Watch the hearing live.

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