All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4 pm

Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers, Ari Shapiro, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

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Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

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Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

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Singer, writer and producer Natasha Khan moved to LA to write scripts and music for film after her 2016 release, The Bride. The release marked the end of her recording contract with EMI and she wasn't sure she'd write another album as Bat for Lashes.

Government Contracting Disparities Hurting Minority Businesses

Feb 16, 2020

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On Valentine's Day, Huey Lewis and The News released Weather — what might be the last album in a career that has spanned four decades. That's because the band's frontman and namesake can no longer hear his own music as it sounds.

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For years now, more and more people have been embracing their natural hair. They're choosing to let it curl rather than straightening it with heat and chemicals. And if you're part of the curly hair community, you know this natural hair movement runs deep.

Valentine's Day is one of the busiest days of the year for those who work in restaurants. It's also a day that many in the industry love to hate.

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In Concord-native Meredith Tate’s new novel, a young woman is kidnapped after a drug deal goes badly. To summon help, she has an out-of-body experience. Her quest to give her sister clues about where she is and how she got there serves as the central action of the book, which is called The Last Confession of Autumn Casterly. Tate spoke about it with NHPR's Peter Biello.

Editor's note: This interview includes discussion of sensitive subjects that may make some listeners feel uncomfortable, such as rape and sexual assault. 

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In Kenya today, some men are boycotting Valentine's Day and going instead to men's empowerment conferences. NPR's Eyder Peralta joined me earlier from Nairobi with some of the attendees.

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Chunlin Leonhard spends most of her time alone in her room at a hotel at the Travis Air Force Base in California, anxiously reading the latest news about the coronavirus outbreak in China.

"I'm doing about as well as can be hoped for under the circumstances," Leonhard, 55, a New Orleans law professor, says during an interview over Skype.

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Scientists can get very excited about what they study, and that means they can be pretty jazzed when what they study gets turned into one of the official emojis of the world and enters our shared visual language.

But sometimes that enthusiasm is tempered by more complex feelings, which is the case with some of the latest emojis that are about to hit our smartphones.

Consider the "rock" emoji.

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In New Hampshire, polls are starting to close in the first primary election of 2020. And to get an early look on how the race is shaking out, we're joined by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Welcome back.

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There was a time when congressional Republicans railed against the budget deficit. In recent history, think of the Tea Party movement, whose members called for driving down debt, deficits and government spending.

Two historic bonsai trees have been stolen, and the Pacific Bonsai Museum in Federal Way, Wash., is putting out a call to get them back.

"These are priceless treasures that belong to our community. And their stories deserve to be preserved and shared broadly," museum Executive Director Kathy McCabe tells NPR. "So please bring them back."

Around 7 a.m. on Sunday morning, two thieves forced their way into the public display of the museum and made off with two roughly 50-pound bonsai: a Japanese black pine and a silverberry.

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