All Things Considered | New Hampshire Public Radio

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

More than 500,000 people have died in the U.S. from COVID-19 since the pandemic hit this country and the world just over a year ago. NPR is remembering some of those who lost their lives by listening to the music they loved and hearing their stories. We're calling our tribute Songs Of Remembrance.

Ian Haney López
Courtesy

A bill in the New Hampshire House has prompted heated debate over how systemic racism is discussed in the state's public schools.

House Bill 544 would prohibit teaching about so-called divisive concepts such as racism and sexism in public schools and other state funded programs. And so far, much of the conversation has hinged on critical race theory, a field that includes the study of systemic racism and the relationship between law, race and power. All Things Considered Host Peter Biello spoke with Ian Haney López, Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Public Law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law, about the legislation. Haney Lopez is a critical race theory scholar.

The Cherokee Nation Supreme Court ruled the nation must remove "by blood" from its tribal constitution in response to a U.S. government decision to include descendants of those enslaved by the tribe.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Darcie Lanthier about people sending cards to their old addresses in Prince Edward Island, Canada to let current tenants know if the rent has been raised illegally.

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with writer Véronique Tadjo about her book, In The Company of Men. It's a novel about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, first published in French in 2017.

In a landmark step in the effort to hold Syrian officials accountable for war crimes, a German court convicted a former Syrian intelligence officer and sentenced him to four and a half years in jail.

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case involving an officer who pursued a misdemeanor suspect into his home without a warrant. Civil liberties groups say the case could expand police powers.

Israeli police reportedly sped after young Israeli settlers suspected of throwing rocks at Palestinians. In the chase, the settlers' car flipped over, killing one of them. It's caused fury.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., about his role as chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee and his opposition to President Biden's COVID-19 relief package.

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with director Lee Isaac Chung about his new film Minari, which tells a story loosely based around his parents' of a Korean-American family adapting to life on an Arkansas farm.

The pandemic has yielded a silver lining for the Brooklyn Public Library. Bilingual librarian Tenzin Kalsang's Tibetan story time has been drawing audiences in the thousands.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hour after hour, in testimony that was sometimes dense, senators and witnesses discussed everything from protective gear for officers to communications between law enforcement agencies to what can be done to prevent future attacks.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hour after hour, in testimony that was sometimes dense, senators and witnesses discussed everything from protective gear for officers to communications between law enforcement agencies to what can be done to prevent future attacks.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The United States hit a devastating milestone today - 500,000 people now dead from COVID-19. That's according to the tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Well, while infections have been falling and vaccinations have been ramping up, about 2,000 people are still dying from the virus in this country each day. President Biden led the nation in remembering and mourning those deaths this evening at the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Two COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed in the U.S. right now, and this week an FDA advisory committee will vote on whether a third should join them.

If granted emergency use authorization, Johnson & Johnson's one-dose vaccine would become available in the U.S., along with those from Pfizer and Moderna.

More than 500,000 people have died in the U.S. from COVID-19 since the pandemic hit this country and the world just over a year ago. NPR is remembering some of those who lost their lives by listening to the music they loved and hearing their stories. We're calling our tribute Songs Of Remembrance.

More than 500,000 people have died in the U.S. from COVID-19 since the pandemic hit this country and the world just over a year ago. NPR is remembering some of those who lost their lives by listening to the music they loved and hearing their stories. We're calling our tribute Songs Of Remembrance.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The United States hit a devastating milestone today - 500,000 people now dead from COVID-19. That's according to the tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Well, while infections have been falling and vaccinations have been ramping up, about 2,000 people are still dying from the virus in this country each day. President Biden led the nation in remembering and mourning those deaths this evening at the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The United States hit a devastating milestone today - 500,000 people now dead from COVID-19. That's according to the tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Well, while infections have been falling and vaccinations have been ramping up, about 2,000 people are still dying from the virus in this country each day. President Biden led the nation in remembering and mourning those deaths this evening at the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The United States hit a devastating milestone today - 500,000 people now dead from COVID-19. That's according to the tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Well, while infections have been falling and vaccinations have been ramping up, about 2,000 people are still dying from the virus in this country each day. President Biden led the nation in remembering and mourning those deaths this evening at the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Now, as it tries to open a diplomatic channel with Iran, the Biden administration is facing another test with that country - how to win the freedom of American detainees there. Iran has a track record of holding people for prisoner swaps or other deals. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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