All Things Considered | New Hampshire Public Radio

All Things Considered

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

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In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

In the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the #MeToo movement took off, a new report finds that people working in Hollywood and the entertainment business say not enough has changed.

The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination, surveyed nearly 10,000 people in the entertainment industry nationwide. It found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation, or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The poet Padraig O Tuama wants to engage you with the power of poems. The podcast he hosts called "Poetry Unbound" starts its second season this week.

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In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

Copyright 2020 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

Here's one thing that isn't the same during a pandemic - winning the Stanley Cup.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

Last week, the House passed Savanna's Act, a bill that requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination, data collection and other guidelines related to cases of murdered or missing Native Americans. It aims to address the alarming number of cases involving Native women.

Former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp first introduced the bill in 2017. It passed the Senate earlier this year and President Trump is expected to sign it into law.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Concert halls and theaters are taking baby steps to reopen. The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., held its first in-person concert, A Time to Sing: An Evening with Renee Fleming and Vanessa Williams. NPR's Elizabeth Blair was there and has this postcard.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Five months ago, we spoke with autism support advocate Feda Almaliti about how the pandemic has affected children with autism like her 15-year-old son, Mu.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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President Trump was able to avoid millions of dollars in taxes, in part because he worked in real estate. Tax advocates say the industry is riddled with credits and loopholes, as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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President Trump has made no secret of his intentions regarding the U.S. Supreme Court and abortion rights. During a presidential debate in 2016, Trump vowed to appoint justices who'd vote to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So what does food insecurity look like and feel like for the 1 in 6 people who are projected to experience it this year? We went to find out.

JOHN ROSS: I need one more volunteer to load cars.

MARTIN: On a Friday earlier this month, we visited a food distribution site in Bethesda, Md. It's in Montgomery County, which is one of the wealthiest counties in the country. But as in many places, the need for food has grown since the beginning of the pandemic.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So what does food insecurity look like and feel like for the 1 in 6 people who are projected to experience it this year? We went to find out.

JOHN ROSS: I need one more volunteer to load cars.

MARTIN: On a Friday earlier this month, we visited a food distribution site in Bethesda, Md. It's in Montgomery County, which is one of the wealthiest counties in the country. But as in many places, the need for food has grown since the beginning of the pandemic.

Lexington, Neb., is just one of the many rural communities that has long dealt with food insecurity, but the global pandemic both intensified need in the town of 11,000 residents and presented new challenges in getting people food.

Ja Nelle Pleasure never used to think twice about putting food on the table for her family.

In fact, the Pleasure family revolved around food. One of their favorite activities was to spin a globe, put a finger down and cook a dish from the country where it lands.

"It was a lot of fun because we got to eat all over the place, stuff that none of us would have dared try before, like silkworms," she says. "They really look disgusting and scary. ... But when you eat it, it tastes like popcorn."

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So what does food insecurity look like and feel like for the 1 in 6 people who are projected to experience it this year? We went to find out.

JOHN ROSS: I need one more volunteer to load cars.

MARTIN: On a Friday earlier this month, we visited a food distribution site in Bethesda, Md. It's in Montgomery County, which is one of the wealthiest counties in the country. But as in many places, the need for food has grown since the beginning of the pandemic.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So what does food insecurity look like and feel like for the 1 in 6 people who are projected to experience it this year? We went to find out.

JOHN ROSS: I need one more volunteer to load cars.

MARTIN: On a Friday earlier this month, we visited a food distribution site in Bethesda, Md. It's in Montgomery County, which is one of the wealthiest counties in the country. But as in many places, the need for food has grown since the beginning of the pandemic.

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