Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

Hurricane Dorian, now a category 4 storm, was heading across the Atlantic toward the Bahamas and the Florida coast on Saturday — and the National Hurricane Center predicts tropical storm winds could reach the Bahamas as soon as Saturday night.

The NHC says "life-threatening storm surge and devastating hurricane-force winds" are possible in the northwestern Bahamas.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said it recently made an unusual seizure at a port in California.

Agents in Long Beach intercepted three shipments containing nearly 53,000 sights, stocks and other gun parts that came illegally from China.

"There was no attempt to hide the importation," Jaime Ruiz told NPR on Friday. He said the gun parts were correctly labeled and still had their original trademarks. And all three shipments were headed to a legitimate seller and distributor.

"It's kind of an unusual situation," Ruiz said.

Updated 1:30 p.m. ET

Days after the United States tested a new cruise missile, Russian President Vladimir Putin is calling for a symmetrical response.

His order comes weeks after the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, a landmark arms control agreement between Washington and Moscow, collapsed on Aug. 2 amid concerns of a renewed arms race.

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET

President Trump says Russia should be allowed to rejoin the Group of Seven industrial nations, and Russia's Foreign Ministry has welcomed his remarks.

Speaking with reporters in the Oval Office on Tuesday, before his scheduled trip to France for the G-7 summit, Trump encouraged Moscow's return to the elite group.

"I think it's much more appropriate to have Russia in," he said. "It should be the G-8 because a lot of the things we talk about have to do with Russia."

Lead contamination in the drinking water in Newark, N.J., is not a new problem, but the city's fleeting solution has become newly problematic.

Officials in Newark, the state's largest city, which supplies water to some 280,000 people, began to hand out bottled water Monday.

That's because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has concerns about water filters that the city distributed to residents.

The granddaughter of the assassinated politician Robert F. Kennedy died this week at age 22, adding to a series of tragedies the family has endured.

Saoirse Kennedy Hill died Thursday in Hyannis Port, Mass., according to the Cape and Islands District Attorney's Office.

A landmark Cold War-era arms control treaty between the United States and Russia officially collapsed on Friday, triggering fears of a new arms race.

The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, signed in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, banned ground-launched cruise missiles with a range between 500 and 5,500 km (310-3,400 miles). More than 2,600 missiles were destroyed by 1991.

A judge in California may have been kept in the dark when she issued a search warrant allowing San Francisco police to monitor the phone of a journalist who was suspected of obtaining a leaked police report, according to newly unsealed court records and the journalist's lawyer.

Attorney Tom Burke, who represents freelance journalist Bryan Carmody, says Superior Court Judge Rochelle East might not have been made aware of his client's profession when the police sought the warrant. (Editor's note: Burke represents NPR on freedom of information matters.)

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Britain's Conservative Party has chosen Boris Johnson to become the country's next prime minister, replacing the pragmatic and sometimes colorless Theresa May with a bombastic populist who favors a no-deal Brexit.

Johnson walked to the lectern inside London's Queen Elizabeth II Centre, thanking his opponent, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and the outgoing May.

India is celebrating the successful launch of its Chandrayaan-2 rocket, which has now started its journey to the moon. It's India's second attempt to launch the unmanned lunar mission and to further its dreams of space exploration.

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET

The World Health Organization's director-general has declared the Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo an international health emergency.

The outbreak in the DRC has killed more than 1,650 people, and about 12 new cases are reported daily, according to the WHO.

North Korea warned Tuesday that negotiations with the United States could falter and that its nuclear and missile tests might resume if the U.S. and South Korea move forward with planned military exercises.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

China's economy grew at the slowest pace in 27 years, as the trade war with the United States takes a toll.

The second-largest economy in the world grew 6.2% in the second quarter of 2019, a drop from 6.4% in the first quarter, according to data released by the Chinese government.

The pace of growth in the second quarter was at its slowest since 1992.

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is being sued by two people who say they criticized her on Twitter and were then blocked from her account, which has more than 4.7 million followers.

The National Rifle Association has shut down its online TV channel and lost its chief lobbyist, new setbacks for a group that also is the subject of another congressional investigation, NPR has learned.

The NRA has struggled under both scrutiny from the outside for its connections to Russia's interference in American politics and from internal divisions over its leadership and its finances.

Istanbul has elected a new mayor in a rerun that is widely being seen as a referendum on President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his grip on Turkey after the first mayoral elections were annulled.

Opposition candidate Ekrem Imamoglu, of the Republican People's Party (CHP), won the race by a slim margin in March. It was the first time Erdogan's Justice and Development Party (AKP) lost control of the city in 25 years.

But Imamoglu spent just 18 days in office.

The storied magazine Sports Illustrated and its website have a new publisher.

The 65-year-old magazine's editorial content will be controlled by a digital outfit called Maven, in a deal announced Monday. Ross Levinsohn, the controversial former publisher of the Los Angeles Times, has been named CEO.

Updated at 3:39 p.m. ET

WarnerMedia, Walt Disney Co. and NBCUniversal will consider stopping productions in Georgia should the state's new abortion law take effect, echoing a threat made this week by Netflix.

WarnerMedia, which owns HBO, CNN and other channels, told NPR in a statement on Thursday, "We will watch the situation closely and if the new law holds we will reconsider Georgia as the home to any new productions." The company said it operates in many states and countries where it may not agree with leaders' stances but respects due process.

Uber has unveiled a new policy that enables the company to kick riders with low ratings to the curb.

For years, Uber allowed passengers to rate drivers on a star system, ultimately allowing customers to influence whether drivers can stay behind the wheel. Internal charts from 2014 published by Business Insider showed that drivers with ratings of 4.6 or below were at risk for the boot.

Updated at 6:27 p.m. ET

President Trump has ordered some 1,500 troops to the Gulf region to serve a "mostly protective" purpose for American forces and interests.

Trump made the announcement to reporters on the White House lawn before boarding Marine One.

In a Pentagon briefing on Friday, Vice Adm. Michael Gilday, the director of the Joint Staff, would not say where the additional troops would be sent, other than that they would not be heading to Iraq and Syria.

Updated at 10:35 a.m.

Harvey Weinstein and his former film studio board members have reached a tentative deal with women who accused the movie mogul of sexual misconduct.

On Thursday, Adam Harris, a lawyer for Weinstein Co. co-founder Bob Weinstein, told a bankruptcy court judge that "an economic agreement in principal" had been reached.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been reelected and his party is poised to take more seats than the 2014 election, signaling India's support of the strongman leader and his Hindu nationalist ideology.

The voting lasted almost six weeks to accommodate nearly 900 million people who were eligible to cast their votes.

On Thursday, the ballots were counted and results showed Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP, winning more seats than any other party.

More than 1,000 victims of the Holocaust were buried Wednesday in Belarus, some 70 years after they were killed in the genocide.

Their bones were unearthed this winter by construction workers as they began to build luxury apartments in the southwestern city of Brest, near Poland.

Soldiers brought in to excavate found undisputed evidence of a mass grave: skulls with bullet holes, shoes and tattered clothing worn on the last day of people's lives.

The number of people dying by suicide in the U.S. has been rising, and a new study shows that the suicide rate among girls ages 10 to 14 has been increasing faster than it has for boys of the same age.

Boys are still more likely to take their own lives. But the study published Friday in JAMA Network Open finds that girls are steadily narrowing that gap.

Updated at 12:53 a.m. ET Monday

Nearly 300 people were killed and hundreds more wounded after explosions tore through Sri Lanka in a series of coordinated blasts that struck three churches and three hotels. It marked the country's worst violence since the end of its civil war in 2009.

Police spokesman Ruwan Gunasekara said Monday the death toll had risen to 290 dead with more than 500 wounded, according to The Associated Press.

Updated at 3:04 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced he will introduce national legislation to raise the minimum age for people buying tobacco products from 18 to 21. Some anti-tobacco advocates worry that the plan could actually harm children by heading off other regulation efforts.

Updated at 9:57 p.m. ET

The Justice Department announced Thursday that it is charging Julian Assange, setting the stage for a historic legal showdown with the controversial founder of WikiLeaks.

The unsealing of an indictment dated more than a year ago followed a whirlwind reversal of fortune for Assange, who was ejected from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he confined himself for years, and then hauled into custody by officers of the Metropolitan Police.

China has announced that all variants of fentanyl will be treated as controlled substances, after Washington urged Beijing to stop fueling the opioid epidemic in the United States.

Authorities in China already regulate 25 variants of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid linked to thousands of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. But some manufacturers in China, seeking to evade controls, have introduced slight changes to the molecular structure of their drugs, giving them the legal loophole to manufacture and export before the government can assess the products for safety and medical use.

Until this week, sex between unmarried people in Utah was technically illegal, a vestige of earlier times.

That changed Wednesday, when Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill that decriminalizes sex outside of marriage in the state, spokesperson Anna Lehnardt tells NPR.

Maria Butina, the Russian woman who pleaded guilty last year to working as a clandestine agent in the United States, will be sentenced on April 26, U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan said Thursday.

Butina, 30, sat silently in a green jump suit during the hearing. She faces a maximum of five years in prison but could receive zero to six months because of a plea deal.

She was arrested in July and has been detained ever since, with federal prosecutors arguing that she was a flight risk.

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