Art Silverman | New Hampshire Public Radio

Art Silverman

All month long, we've been celebrating 50 years of NPR and how it all started on May 3, 1971 with the first broadcast of All Things Considered.

We asked you, our listeners, what stories have captivated you over the decades. Your responses included stories from each decade that brought you laughter, gave you a chance to connect with your family and made you see the world in a different way. Even NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg shared two of her favorite stories from the show's first two decades.

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For more than a year, we have shared stories about people who have died of COVID-19 in the U.S. Today, the story of an Ohio couple who were childhood sweethearts.

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As the coronavirus spread throughout the country last spring, marathoners heard this: "On your mark. Get set. Wait."

After a year and half without races, soon the last word will be "Go!"

Starting late summer, several marathons in big cities will be back. Plans have been made, and people have signed up for those 26.2-mile races in Boston, London, Tokyo, Chicago and other locales.

All this news makes runner Jeff Dengate happy. "I have not run at all in the last 18 months. I'm really bumming out," he says.

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To help ALL THINGS CONSIDERED celebrate 50 years on the air, listeners are sharing stories that have stayed with them.

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This week, ALL THINGS CONSIDERED turns 50. Joel Abrams of Boston recalls making dinner one night in 1991 and listening to a story about Haitian cane cutters in the Dominican Republic. Here is an unnamed cutter heard through an interpreter.

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To celebrate this show's 50th birthday, listeners are telling us about favorite stories they heard on our air.

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ALL THINGS CONSIDERED turns 50 this week. And to help mark that milestone, NPR founding listener Susan Stamberg recalls an interview she did in 1986.

Monday, May 3, 2021, marks the 50th anniversary of NPR's first on-air original broadcast. In the last half century, NPR and Member stations have been essential, trusted sources for local events and cultural programming featuring music, local history, education and the arts. To mark this milestone, we're reflecting on — and renewing — our commitment to serve an audience that reflects America and to Hear Every Voice.


In the 50 years that All Things Considered has been on the air, the ground under journalism has shifted.

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With this program marking 50 years on the air today, listeners shared moments they heard here that stuck with them.

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For Canice Flanagan of San Francisco, one such moment was in May 2008.

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May 3 may not seem like much, but it is the date that this show first hit the airwaves way back in 1971.

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TV news aired on three networks.

CHANG: Milk cost 50 cents a gallon.

CORNISH: Lew Alcindor had just led the Milwaukee Bucks to an NBA title.

CHANG: National Public Radio may not have had many listeners that first broadcast, but those who did tune in tended to stay around for more.

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High schools are closed and their musicals are canceled around the country because of coronavirus concerns.

Theater kids now have no audience to showcase the numbers they've worked on, some for months and even years.

They won't have a live audience for the time being, but Broadway star Laura Benanti, who won a Tony award in 2008 for her performance in Gypsy, wanted to give student performers the next best thing — an online audience.

She put the call out on Friday.

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While Americans wait for Nevada's caucuses this Saturday, NPR's Art Silverman talked with Democrats lining up to pick their candidates at a couple of early vote sites. Here's a glimpse of the state's first-ever early caucus experience.

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As young men, the sons of the Villalobos family in rural Veracruz, Mexico embarked on separate paths — at least, geographically. One by one, the three violin-playing brothers left their hometown of Xalapa to study classical music abroad. Ernesto, the oldest of the three, went to study at the Manhattan School of Music. Alberto, the middle brother, went to the Royal Conservatory of Brussels and finally Luis, the youngest, went to the Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg, Germany.

Though Pete Seeger, the heralded folk singer, songwriter and social activist died in 2014, his voice has left a lasting impression on American music. May 3, 2019 would have been Seeger's 100th birthday and to mark the centennial, Smithsonian Folkways is set to release a six-CD collection titled Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection.

Whenever you bring together dozens of different countries from around the globe, there's bound be some cross-cultural confusion. The World Cup is no exception.

And if you're Shin Tae-yong, coach of the South Korean national team, you figure out how to work that confusion to your advantage. In a press conference Sunday, Shin explained the unusual tactic he'd employed against scouts from the Swedish team: He'd had his team members swap jersey numbers for the warm-up games, in hopes that scouts wouldn't be able to tell the players apart.

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