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Strawberry super moon rising: What to expect tonight

A Strawberry Supermoon will rise June 14, 2022. Here's what to look for.
Dan Tuohy
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NHPR
A Strawberry Supermoon will rise June 14, 2022. Here's what to look for.

Why is it called the Strawberry Super Moon?

Update, June 15: AP Photos: Supermoon delights skygazers around the globe

Heads up: A strawberry supermoon will illuminate the sky tonight.

A supermoon occurs when the moon's orbit is closest to Earth at the same time the moon is full, NASA reminds us. Quick points from the NASA Moon guide:

  • At 7:24 p.m. June 14, the moon will be at perigee (closest to Earth).
  • This will be the lowest full moon of 2022, reach only 23.3 degrees above the horizon Wednesday morning at 1:56 a.m.
  • The rising moon will appear 3 degrees above the southeastern horizon.
  • Sunset in New Hampshire will be about 8:23 p.m. on June 14.

OK, so why is this called the strawberry supermoon?

Per NASA: "In the 1930s, the Maine Farmer's Almanac began publishing Native American names for full moons. According to this Almanac, the Algonquin tribes of what is now the northeastern United States called this the Strawberry Moon."

It's based on the strawberry harvest season.

One more fact from NASA: The term "supermoon" comes from astrologer Richard Nolle, who in 1979 used it to refer to the new or full moon that occurs when the moon is within 90% of perigee.

The full moon is seen as it rises near the Lincoln Memorial, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington. The full moon tonight is called a "Super Perigee Moon" since it is at it's closest to Earth in 2011. The last full moon so big and close to Earth occurred in March of 1993. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls)
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(NASA/Bill Ingalls)
The full moon is seen as it rises near the Lincoln Memorial, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington. The full moon tonight is called a "Super Perigee Moon" since it is at it's closest to Earth in 2011. The last full moon so big and close to Earth occurred in March of 1993. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

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