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Business and Economy
The PastHistorically New Hampshire, like much of New England, depended heavily on paper and grain mills to support its economy. With the decline of mill work throughout the 20th century, the state came to lean on traditional manufacturing as an economic driver. And although manufacturing is still an important part of New Hampshire’s economy, advances in technology and the decline of traditional fabrication work all over the country means factories employ far fewer people than in the past. Toward the end of the 20th century, Massachusetts became a center for high-tech sectors. And in turn, New Hampshire has been able to piggy-back off its neighbor’s success, moving its economy toward electronic component manufacturing and other high-tech industries.Despite these historic challenges, compared to the rest of the country overall, New Hampshire’s economy is still considered robust.But talking about New Hampshire’s economy as a whole is tricky business. That’s in part because the state’s culturally–and often economically–distinguished by its regions. So while tourism is central to the Lakes Region economy, it’s less prominent in the Merrimack Valley. And although high-tech work is integral to the Seacoast and Upper Valley economies, it’s much less a factor in the North Country. But keeping regional differences in mind, some overarching statewide trends do emerge.The PresentAt this point, a few industries act as main drivers for the state’s economy:Smart Manufacturing/High Technology (SMHT): SMHT is the largest and most important sector of the state’s economy. New Hampshire’s SMHT sector is mainly known for using high-tech equipment to produce electronic components. Tourism: New Hampshire has traditionally depended on its natural resources and recreational opportunities to draw in out-of-state visitors throughout the year. The Seacoast, Lakes Region, and White Mountains are the primary tourism hotspots. Health Care Fields: The Seacoast is a major hub for biomedical research in New Hampshire. And thanks to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, the Upper Valley has become another center for biotech and other medical research. The state also hosts ten major hospitals, in addition to smaller facilities, that employ a number of health care workers.The FutureLooking to the future, economists say a number of issues could affect the state’s economy, including:Demographic Change: One-in-three residents is a Baby Boomer. As they retire, they’ll move into Medicare and Medicaid, which could place a further financial strain on medical facilities that currently count on higher revenue from private insurers.Health Care Costs: This issue is closely tied to demographic change. New Hampshire is second in the nation for the portion of private sector employees with health insurance. But as these workers retire, they’ll move into entitlement programs, which could force providers to shift the cost of care to private insurance programs–and, by extension, to businesses.Education Funding: New Hampshire operates one of the lowest-funded–and most expensive–state university systems in the country. Many young residents find it cheaper to simply study out-of-state. And many of the state’s young people also choose to live elsewhere. The decline of a homegrown, educated workforce could hurt New Hampshire’s tax base and overall economy.Energy Costs: The state has some of the highest per-unit energy costs in the country. This overhead cost can be a barrier for manufacturers and other businesses that use lots of power setting up or expanding in New Hampshire.

Breaking Down NH's Manufacturing Economy By County

Given that manufacturing got prominent play in the State of the State address and is a key piece of President Obama's new jobs initiative, StateImpact's in full-on data-slicing mode.

First, a bit of background. It's well-known in the state's business circles that, despite the decline of mills, manufacturing is still New Hampshire's powerhouse industry. Smart Manufacturing/High-Technology is the state's largest economic sector, far outpacing tourism, which is often thought of as a "signature" industry for New Hampshire.

And all the recent political buzz about manufacturing got us wondering...where are these economic juggernauts concentrated?

And it just so happens, the US Census Bureau had our back on that.

Earlier this week, we linked to just one of several interactive features on the Census' new County Business Patterns & Demographics map. Unfortunately, this handy little tool wasn't designed to be embedded on websites. But we highly encourage you to visit the map.

It's a fun way to while away a bit of time.

For our purposes, here's what's important about it: If you click on each county, and then click the "Industries" tab, you can find the top industries for each county, broken down by raw numbers and percentages. What we've decided to do is take that data and create a table showing how well represented manufacturing is in each county.

It's unsurprising to us that as the state's main population center, Hillsborough County dominates in terms of raw numbers. But this table also helps measure diversity of an area's economy. For all that Hillsborough County has 592 factories, those facilities only make up 5.5 percent of total businesses in the area. While Sullivan County only boasts 98 factories, the manufacturing sector accounts for nearly one-in-ten businesses in that part of the state.

Manufacturing By County

Copyright 2021 StateImpact New Hampshire. To see more, visit StateImpact New Hampshire.