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Prisoners Work To Restore Threatened Species

Inmate Adrianne Crabtree and ODOC Captain Chad Naugle plant violets in a meadow of the Siuslaw National Forest to support recovery of the threatened Oregon Silverspot butterfly. (Larkin Guenther via Northwest News Network)
Inmate Adrianne Crabtree and ODOC Captain Chad Naugle plant violets in a meadow of the Siuslaw National Forest to support recovery of the threatened Oregon Silverspot butterfly. (Larkin Guenther via Northwest News Network)

At the end of 2014, environmental officials will have 36 more years to complete a nearly $10 billion dollar restoration of Florida’s Everglades. It’s the biggest and most expensive such project in U.S. history and effects nearly 70 species.

The work of restoring threatened plants and animals to the wild takes time and patience.

In a half dozen states, inmates are doing the work.

From the Here & Now Contributor’s Network, Tom Banse of the Northwest News Network went to a prison in Oregon to bring us this story.

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