Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

Coronavirus updates for New Hampshire
CDC

NHPR is continuing to cover the developing story around coronavirus in New Hampshire. Bookmark this page for the latest updates, including case numbers and other important news of the day. Click here for all of our COVID-19 coverage.

School Funding: A New Lawsuit and COVID-19

Sep 28, 2020
Three students sit at desks completing worksheets.
The City Journal

Though it has been the subject of debate for decades, school funding is back in the limelight in New Hampshire. The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments last week after four districts sued the state for not funding an adequate education for students. We examine the history and nuances of this discussion and explore how the issue is complicated by COVID-19. 

Air date: Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. 

Find all of our coverage and share your experiences with NHPR's COVID & The Classroom.

COVID-19 has caused widespread damage to the economy — so wide that it can be easy to overlook how unevenly households are suffering. But new polling data out this month reveal households that either have had someone with COVID-19 or include someone who has a disability or special needs are much more likely to also be hurting financially.

CDC

New Hampshire identified its first case of COVID-19 on March 2. NHPR has been tracking new developments since then, as the number of confirmed cases and testing capacity — at public and private labs — has expanded.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del viernes 25 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Rastreadores de contacto del estado identifican a más de 22,000 personas potencialmente expuestas a casos de COVID-19

wikimedia commons

Some long-term care facilities are slowly reopening to allow visits from family members, recognizing that residents have been suffering both emotionally and physically after months of isolation.  The facilities have been doing so according to guidelines released recently by the state, as well as by federal authorities. 

Still, it can be a precarious balancing act: Allowing more people in – especially when adequate testing is lacking – can mean introducing the virus.  

In another effort aimed at getting travelers back on planes, United Airlines will begin offering on-the-spot coronavirus testing to some passengers at the airport before they board their flight.

Due to the recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, women are leaving their jobs or scaling back work responsibilities at alarming rates. And in part, it’s because of the still-ingrained expectation that women are responsible for child care.

From Chabeli Carrrazana, writing for The 19th:

Since the pandemic began, working mothers have grappled with staying engaged at their jobs. That predictable outcome has big consequences for families, employers and the American economy.

Susan Simoneta via Flickr CC

New Hampshire's high death rate from COVID-19 in elder-care facilities has exposed gaps in protective gear, testing, and staffing. Improvements have come in some areas but challenges remain. Meanwhile, both the state and federal government recently issued new visitation guidelines to help ease the severe mental and physical health effects of isolation. We examine how these facilities are preparing for this change.

Air date: Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020.

From shiny red pencils reading "My Attendance Rocks!" to countless plaques and ribbons and trophies and certificates and gold stars: For as long as anyone can remember, taking attendance — and rewarding kids for simply showing up — is a time-honored school ritual.

For good reason: Just being there, day in, day out, happens to be one of the most important factors that determines a child's success in school. And average daily head count forms the basis of school funding decisions at the federal, state and local level.

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, Jesus Gonzalez was about a year into starting a Cuban food catering and "pop-up" business in Lexington, Ky. It's like "a food truck, but without a truck," he says.

His steadiest gig was setting up tables with a spread of Cuban food at local breweries so people could eat while quaffing pints. But then all that shut down. And he says things aren't back to normal enough yet for the breweries to bring him back.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

More school districts are announcing positive COVID-19 cases, prompting a handful of schools and over a thousand students to go to remote learning plans this week.

Courtesy Rachel Starr Davis

In the wake of a Portsmouth mother getting kicked off of an American Airlines flight after her toddler refused to wear a mask, some public health experts are questioning whether very young children need them.

Dr. Keith Loud, the physician-in-chief at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, says young children are still a lower risk for COVID-19 transmission.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force are briefing a Senate panel on the federal response to the pandemic.

Witnesses include Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health and CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield.

Get updates about COVID-19 in New Hampshire in your inbox - sign up for your newsletter today.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del martes 22 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.


Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted guidance Friday evening saying that aerosol transmission might be one of the "most common" ways the coronavirus is spreading — and then took the guidance down on Monday.

The now-deleted updates were notable because so far the CDC has stopped short of saying that the virus is airborne.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As NHPR tracks the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, we’ve been asking you to tell us how your life is changing because of coronavirus - and we’ve welcomed your questions

Here, we answer some of your questions, and share other important information about the coronavirus and how to stay safe.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited New Hampshire on Friday to meet with school leaders, teachers and students in Bedford, but her visit was curtailed by a newly confirmed COVID-19 case in the district.

CDC

There's been a steady rise in the number of COVID-19 cases in New Hampshire over the last two weeks, but the number of deaths and hospitalizations due to the virus have remained flat.

How should we make sense of the current coronavirus numbers? NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Dr. Michael Calderwood, an infectious disease expert at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, about what trends we should be paying attention to.

Maine is investigating a possible COVID-19 outbreak at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.
Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A commuter van that transported workers in Maine to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery may be the source of a new COVID-19 outbreak, the Maine Centers for Disease Control announced Thursday.

Officials say they’re investigating 18 cases total at the facility, with 13 among Maine residents and the rest from New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

En el noticiero de hoy, te compartimos una entrevista con Claudia Castaño, coordinadora para el programa de English Language Learners del distrito de Nashua, sobre cómo ha empezado el año escolar y que recursos de apoyo hay para familias de los estudiantes. 

También te compartimos otras noticias sobre lo que sucede en New Hampshire hoy, viernes 18 de septiembre.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Activists gathered Thursday night for a virtual vigil to honor lives lost to coronavirus and condemn President Trump's handling of the pandemic.

The event – organized by Black Lives Matter Manchester, Rights and Democracy, and the New Hampshire Youth Movement - was streamed from near the Trump campaign office in Manchester.

Flickr/Martin Bekkelund

A nationwide shortage of remote learning resources during the pandemic means the states’s largest school districts - Nashua and Manchester – are short thousands of Chromebook laptops.

The Nashua School District already distributed about 7,000 Chromebooks this fall, but some families have started remote learning without computers at home.

A tweet from UNH faculty member Clark Knowles
Via Twitter

During Wednesday’s legislative session at the University of New Hampshire's Whittemore Center, a handful of state representatives drank beer and did not wear masks outside of the center, despite the town of Durham’s mask mandate.

UNH students and staff have criticized this behavior online.

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Updated on Sept. 18 at 2:15 p.m. ET

At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, there were lots of stories about scrappy manufacturers promising to revamp their factories to start making personal protective equipment in the U.S.

Back in the spring, fuel-cell maker Adaptive Energy retooled part of its factory in Ann Arbor, Mich., to make plastic face shields. Now, 100,000 finished shields are piling up in cardboard boxes on the factory floor — unsold.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

School districts will be getting less money from the federal government than they expected this fall to cover COVID-related expenses.

Get updates about COVID-19 in N.H. in your inbox - sign up for our newsletter today! 

For months, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) had told schools that they were eligible for reimbursement for PPE, plastic desk barriers, cleaning supplies, and other materials.

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday again said widespread distribution of a vaccine against the coronavirus would happen before the end of the year, directly contradicting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield. The CDC chief testified earlier Wednesday that a vaccine would not be widely available until next spring or summer.

Trump said he expects the government to be able to distribute a vaccine "sometime in October," though "it may be a little later than that."

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