hate speech

Hate rhetoric online has been linked to several recent incidents of mass violence in the United States and internationally. But even when this kind of speech doesn't lead to physical harm, it is damanging to the targeted group and the wider community. We look at how hateful language has impacted people over time, and what our legal system says. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Seacoast faith leaders and hundreds of residents came together for a vigil at a Portsmouth synagogue Monday night, after Saturday’s attack on Jewish worshippers in Pittsburgh.

The shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue is being investigated as a hate crime. It was the deadliest attack on American Jews in U.S. history.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Members of a Jewish Temple in Manchester are among those who lost family in the Pittsburgh Synagogue shooting that left 11 dead Saturday.

 

Temple Adath Yeshurun Rabbi Beth Davidson said shooting victim Joyce Fienberg had attended her sister-in-law's bat mitzvah at the Temple Adath two years ago.

The Exchange

 

The head of New Hampshire's Civil Rights Unit says the shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue that killed 11 people Saturday is a case of domestic terrorism. 

 

Elizabeth Lahey is director of the Civil Rights Unit at the New Hampshire Department of Justice. She joined The Exchange on Monday to discuss the mass shooting in Pennsylvania. Host Laura Knoy asked her if these shootings should be called domestic terrorism.

 

Anti-Semitic Graffiti Drawn On Church Door In Wilmot

Jul 5, 2018
Courtesy photo

The First Congregational Church of Wilmot is hosting public gathering this weekend to respond to anti-semitic graffiti recently discovered on the church’s front door.

A couple weeks ago, reverend Sara Marean drove up to her church for the Sunday service and found the scrawled in black permanent marker across the building’s white door. She says it was a shock to her community.

After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, people in this region are looking more closely at local racist and anti-Semitic groups: their statements, their plans, and what may happen next.  We'll talk about those issues and gauge the overall New Hampshire reaction to what happened this weekend. 


Pixabay.com

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


Cory Doctorow; Flickr

Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What's free speech?  And what's hate speech? What's dissent?  What's a threat?  

This show originally aired on November 29, 2016. 

Nicholas Wilson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dSBvrk

Since Election Day, reports of hate crimes have soared across the nation. While well-documented in the news and on social media, the real numbers could be even higher. Today: why reporting and tracking hate crimes begins - and sometimes ends - with local cops, courts and cultural norms.

Also today, the Feds contemplate a scary scenario: an asteroid hurtling towards greater Los Angeles. We'll speak with NASA's planetary defense officer about teaming up with FEMA, the Air Force and other government agencies for a simulation of what could happen if an asteroid crashed into a densely populated region - and how they'd respond. 

unh.edu

Last week, students, faculty and staff at the University of New Hampshire received an email from UNH president Mark Huddleston condemning a recent spike in incidents of hate speech on campus. NHPR’s Jason Moon visited campus to see how the school community was responding to the letter.