The Doorway

Wikimedia Commons

 

Congress is expected to vote on a government spending bill this week that would allow money earmarked for opioid use disorder to be used to treat other addictions. The provision, authored by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, comes in response to concerns that federal money coming into New Hampshire was too narrowly tailored to the opioid crisis.

Courtesy of American Medical Response

 

More people in Manchester and Nashua have been using Narcan this year to revive someone who has overdosed on opioids

The data comes from American Medical Response, which provides emergency response services in southern New Hampshire.

AMR says that for the fourth consecutive month, a record number of people have used Narcan after an overdose before first responders arrive. 

Sara Plourde For NHPR

The new statewide program for people seeking addiction treatment, The Doorway, is described as a "hub and spoke" system that  includes nine locations around the state, called "hubs," where people can just walk in and begin the process of getting help.  The system was set up about nine months ago. We're finding out how it's working in certain areas of the state.

This show airs Tuesday, Sept. 24, live at 9 a.m., with rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 13, 2019

Sep 12, 2019

We discuss how 2020 candidates fare in the third Democratic Presidential debate from a national, and Granite State, perspective.  Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts share the debate stage for the first time.  We check in on any progress in negotiations on the state budget.  And we take a closer look at the mounting pressure on leaders in Manchester to deal with a crisis of homelessness and addiction.  NHPR's Southern New Hampshire reporter Sarah Gibson is guest host.  

GUESTS:

Narcan, also known as naloxone, is an anti-overdose drug.
Paige Sutherland for NHPR

 

Documented opioid overdoses in Manchester and Nashua are on the decline, but in Manchester, overdose deaths are increasing.

New data from the emergency response group American Medical Response shows a mixture of progress and struggle for those coping with opioid use disorder and the agencies tasked with supporting them.