Conservation | New Hampshire Public Radio

Conservation

Jungletrax Bengal Cats, with permission

The Bengal cat is an attempt to preserve the image of a leopard in the body of a house cat: using a wild animal’s genes to get the appearance, while leaving out the wild animal personality. But is it possible to isolate the parts of a wild animal that you like, and forgo the parts that you don’t?

Can you have your leopard rosette and your little cat too?

This episode was originally published in 2018.

A national conservation group has set up an $18 million fund to conserve forest in New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine, among other states, as a way to fight climate change.  

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The U.S. Interior Department is rolling back a change to a major conservation grant program that had raised concerns among New Hampshire lawmakers.

The change, issued by the Trump administration on its last day in office, limited states’ ability to set their own priorities for outdoor recreation grant spending under the long-running Land and Water Conservation Fund, or LWCF.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A continuación, lee las noticias del 10 de febrero. 

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Programa estatal permitirá que residentes se vacunen en los Walgreens de NH 

Pronto, algunos residentes de New Hampshire podrán vacunarse en contra del COVID-19 en los Walgreens alrededor del estado. 

Maja Dumat, https://bit.ly/3nMmp2J

The 8th season of the reality television show North Woods Law – a show that follows  conservation officers from New Hampshire’s Fish & Game Department – kicks off with a skunk rescue, a nosey bear being chased out of town, and a multi-day search and rescue operation that ends with a drowning victim being pulled out of the Androscoggin River. 

In this episode of Outside/In, a closer look at the people who police the natural world and how we use it, as depicted by reality television. 

Yellowstone National Park

The National Parks are seen as a national treasure, touted by some as “America’s Best Idea.” But restricting access to the natural world as a method of conservation is also part of a history of indigenous erasure. 

 

On this episode, we trace the history of the prejoratively-termed “fortress conservation,” from Robin Hood to Fort Yellowstone and the global spread of national parks and preserves.

 

Plus, what the likelihood of another four years of divided government means for climate action.

NH Fish & Game / Facebook

The N.H. Fish and Game Department has a new executive director, following a contentious nomination process.

North Country dairy farmer Scott Mason was confirmed by a 3 to 1 vote at the Executive Council Wednesday.

Mason's nomination had support from business leaders and Republican lawmakers.

Dmoore5556 / Creative Commons

President Trump on Tuesday signed a bipartisan bill that permanently funds the nation's biggest natural resource conservation program.

State environmental groups say the Great American Outdoors Act, backed by New Hampshire’s Congressional delegation, is a milestone that's been decades in the making.

NH Preservation Alliance

Senate lawmakers on Thursday advanced a plan to expand state conservation funding, while voting down an alternative supported by Gov. Chris Sununu.

LCHIP

Gov. Chris Sununu says he'd support a budget increase for a popular state conservation fund. It’s the latest turn in a running debate on the issue with state lawmakers.

NH Fish & Game

Environmental groups say a new state rule, which has support from the construction industry and could become permanent, puts endangered species at greater risk from development.

For years, state regulation has mandated that development projects “not result in adverse impacts” to a list of more than 50 critters that the state considers threatened or endangered.

Governor Chris Sununu has joined bipartisan calls for Congress to permanently fund a key federal land and water conservation program.

The decades-old Land and Water Conservation Fund, or LWCF, has provided nearly $40 million in grants for hundreds of New Hampshire's state parks, heritage sites and other outdoor preservation projects.

Scanning N.H. Skies: Diminishing Bird Numbers

Oct 8, 2019
File photo

Birds are a good indicator of environmental health, and a recent study shows a drastic decline in the North American bird population - with three billion birds gone since 1970. The numbers were drawn with help from the birdwatching community. We see how this decline is playing out in New Hampshire, and look for inspiration from some successes in the Granite State. 

Air Date: Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019

Photo by Will Staats/NHFG

We talk with wildlife biologist Kristine Rines.  For three decades, she worked with  New Hampshire Fish and Game as the moose project leader.  We discuss the changes she saw during her tenure, from the ravaging of the moose population due to winter ticks and the changes in the state's habitat and public attitudes.  As a biologist, she worked with many of NH's wild creatures known as charismatic megafauna such as bear and moose.

Air date: Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Karla Cinquanta

Jane Difley, the first female president of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, is retiring on October 1, 2019, after 22 years. As a licensed forester, she has seen forest management evolve since she was a Forest Society intern in the 1970s. Her conservation leadership of the state's scenic landscapes includes establishing and getting dedicated funding for L-CHIP, as well as playing a role in the protection of the Connecticut Lakes Headwaters, the Balsams, and Mount Major. The Forest Society was also a leader in the fight against the Northern Pass transmission pipeline.

Vanessa Johnson

The conservationists who help maintain New Hampshire’s landscapes for public use will be in Alton this weekend for their sold-out annual conference.

Conservation specialist Amanda Stone of UNH Extension says they’ll focus in part on adapting to climate change and exposing new demographics to the outdoors.

Courtesy of the Monadnock Conservancy

A large agricultural property stretching more than a mile along the Connecticut River in southwestern New Hampshire is now permanently conserved.

The property, Chickering Farm, has been passed down through six generations in a single family, according to the Monadnock Conservancy.

DEERHAKE. 11 VIA FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS

 

The caretakers of the White Mountain National Forest count among their 2018 accomplishments a land addition, investment in roads and trails and support from volunteers.

Officials say a highlight last year was adding nearly 800 acres to the forest's boundary by securing a new tract of land along the Upper Ammonoosuc River.

On the Lookout for Bald Eagles in N.H.

Jan 29, 2019

We examine results from New Hampshire's 39th Annual Mid-winter Eagle Population Survey and learn more about these iconic birds, whose numbers in the state have been growing.  N.H. Audubon monitors bald eagles as part of an annual contract with the NH Fish and Game Department's Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program.  Bald eagles are now listed as “Special Concern” in the state since their official removal from NH’s Threatened and Endangered Wildlife List in March 2017. And we look at the impact of the eagle's success on another beloved symbol of New Hampshire, the loon.  

Photo credit: © Jerry Monkman, EcoPhotography, LLC

Representatives with New Hampshire's Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) today announced awards of almost $4 million in matching grants.

 

At total of 42 natural and historic resource projects will receive the L-CHIP money.

Something Wild: Terns Thriving on Isles of Shoals

Sep 28, 2018
Chris Martin/NHPR/NHA

We started the day on Appledore Island, just outside Portsmouth Harbor. The Shoals Marine Lab, resident there, traces its history back to 1928. Among the biologists spending the summer there this year were Dr. Elizabeth Craig, Tern Conservation Program Manager. "There are three species that I’m hoping we’re going to see today; the common tern, the roseate tern and the arctic tern." In her orientation she walks through the differences among the species, but all three are long lived, which for birds, means 10-30 year life-spans.

Nashua River Watershed Association

The Nashua River is one step closer to federal protections that are decades in the making.

Federal lawmakers from New Hampshire and Massachusetts introduced legislation Thursday to designate the river as "wild and scenic."

The designation would add scrutiny for federal projects that impact the river and two of its tributaries, and would help fund future preservation work.

 

Hunters, hikers and horseback riders will have greater access to nearly 800 acres of land in northern New Hampshire thanks to partnership between the U.S. Forest Service and the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund.

The land — 180 acres in Stark and 603 acres in Milan — is located within and next to the White Mountain National Forest. Officials say the purchase will help connect the towns to snowmobile trails, rivers and hiking paths.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

There’s a field in Peterborough that makes all the other fields jealous. It’s about a mile from downtown, roughly 20 acres, with a small stand of trees in the southwest corner.

It’s a great-looking field. Stand in the middle, and you’re rewarded with views of Mt. Monadnock.  

Stan Fry believes there’s just one thing missing from this place.

file photo

Conservationists say two iconic New Hampshire animals – moose and loons – show how climate change will reshape the region in the years to come.

They talked about their latest research – and how they hope people will respond to it – at the Audubon Society in Concord Wednesday night.

It was the same day New Hampshire and Maine set new records for winter warmth. Highs were in the 70s in Concord, and the snowless Mount Washington summit reached 48.

Toppazzini / Flickr Creative Commons

A Portsmouth-based conservation group is getting a $25,000 grant to help clean up the New England coastline.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Republican Gov. Chris Sununu's Executive Council approved the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation for the grant Wednesday. The federal grant is backed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. According to state officials, the grant supports debris collection, pollution prevention and public awareness efforts.

Something Wild: Terns Thriving on Isles of Shoals

Sep 29, 2017
Chris Martin/NHPR/NHA

We started the day on Appledore Island, just outside Portsmouth Harbor. The Shoals Marine Lab, resident there, traces its history back to 1928. Among the biologists spending the summer there this year were Dr. Elizabeth Craig, Tern Conservation Program Manager. "There are three species that I’m hoping we’re going to see today; the common tern, the roseate tern and the arctic tern." In her orientation she walks through the differences among the species, but all three are long lived, which for birds, means 10-30 year life-spans.

Scott Heron; Flickr

We couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

Photo courtesy of Chris Connors

Residents of Warner and surroundings towns have requested to place the Warner River under a state environmental protection program. 

The Warner River is a favorite location for trout fisherman and kayakers. Joining New Hampshire's River Management and Protection Program would mean that people who live near the river will have a say in conserving it.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will discuss federal funds for state-level conservation efforts at an event at the Bass Pro Shop in Hooksett Tuesday.

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