Rebecca Lavoie | New Hampshire Public Radio

Rebecca Lavoie

Director, Audience & Engagement

Rebecca oversees several teams responsible for growing, diversifying, and engaging with NHPR's audience across broadcast and digital platforms.

In 2010, Rebecca made the transition to radio from her career as a writer. The co-author of five nonfiction true crime books, she has also written for publications including the Concord Monitor, New Hampshire Magazine, Newsweek, and Playboy Magazine

Rebecca is also the host of her own hit podcast, Crime Writers On…, on which she moderates a panel discussing other podcasts, pop culture, true crime, and journalism, as well as the host of the Netflix podcast, You Can't Make This Up.

Ways to Connect

Boyan Moskov

Ask and you shall receive. 

We asked our listeners and contributors to send us favorite foliage shots from around the state. We're around peak right now, and this is how it looks. 

Have more photos to contribute? Send them to us by email, or post them on our Facebook page. 

via Zazzle.com

This week, NHPR's Amanda Loder is reporting a series of stories on New Hampshire's emerging app development economy. (What's that, you ask? Check out our app explainer here.)

Scott McPherson for NHPR

10:14 Earthquake monitored in real time at 9:07 PM from the Weston Observatory. Link is here. 

10:05 Map posted on the Weston Observatory site indicates epicenter located 5 Km northwest of Contoocook, with a magnitude of 2.5.

9:55 Seismographic data from the Weston Observatory shows activity at approximately 9:08 PM.

After a lockdown earlier today, Brian Blake, the Superintendent of Schools for the Sanborn Regional School district, posted this message on the Sanborn Regional High School's Facebook page:

Here are the stories that got the most attention on NHPR.org last week. Did you miss them? Click below to read or listen!

1. USDA Airdrops Vanilla Flavored Rabies Vaccines Over Eastern Forests

2. Across The River, Vermont Puts Its Money On Local Food

Image courtesy The Music Hall

The new season of Writers On A New England Stage includes events with Margaret Atwood, Bill Bryson, Woodrow Wilson biographer A. Scott Berg, and crime novelist Patricia Cornwell.

The authors will read from and discuss their latest works, and then sit down with Word Of Mouth host Virginia Prescott for a discussion and to answer audience questions.

You can see the full lineup and purchase tickets by clicking here.

After my interview with Joyce Maynard about her new novel, After Her, I asked her about the super-secret book and documentary on J.D. Salinger being released this fall. Was she interviewed for the film? She was. Here she is talking about it, and about Salinger's brief appearance in her life taking up so much space in the portrait of how she's perceived.

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

The Saturday show bring you a spectacular mix of the best of Word of Mouth. On this week's show:

  • Joyce Maynard stops by the studio to talk about her new novel After Her, and why the last thing she feels is shame when it comes to her decision to discuss her relationship with J.D. Salinger.
  • Eating Trader Joe's Trash. New Hampshire native and documentary filmmaker Alex Mannis' film Spoils gives a fly on the dumpster account of Brooklynites who forage in the urban jungle of grocery store cast offs.

Courtesy JoyceMaynard.com

Say the name "Joyce Maynard" and you’re likely to get some pretty visceral reactions…from those who’ve admired her career since her time as a reporter for the New York Times and her later syndicated column “Domestic Affairs,” and from her detractors…those who are critical of her relentless self-examination and her revelations about her relationship with J.D. Salinger. Salinger was living as a recluse in Cornish, New Hampshire when he began exchanging letters with Maynard after reading an article she wrote as a freshman at Yale. She dropped out of college and moved in with Salinger. She was eighteen…Salinger was 53.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our weekly round-up of radio-tastic content...all in one jam packed hour. This week, This week, a suspicious case of fake comments on Amazon points to pro-telecom lobbyists, a bookseller explains why he'll no longer complain about Amazon, an editor for Slate proclaims Instagram "depressing," a teeny anthropologist infiltrates the gangs of Los Angeles, the real-life "Walter White," space weather forecasting, and writer and Found Magazine editor Davy Rothbart talks about his book, My Heart Is An Idiot.

xsas via Flickr Creative Commons

Tom Holbrook is the co-owner and manager of the independent RiverRun Bookstore in Portsmouth and one of our partners for the writers on a New England Stage series.  Tom recently sent out an email saying “why I’m not going to complain about Amazon anymore” to the more than 2500 members of RiverRun’s e-mail list. Word of Mouth Senior Producer Rebecca Lavoie tracked Tom down to find out what was behind it. We have a copy of Tom's email posted on our Facebook page, Word of Mouth Radio.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content from the daily version of the program, packaged in one weekly radio show that airs Saturday at noon.

This week, Robert Kolker talks about his new book, "Lost Girls," which chronicles the unsolved case of the Long Island Serial Killer. Plus, what our voices say about us; learning about love from The Hunger Games; the "Apple Whisperer"; and Red Heart the Ticker performs live from Studio D.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content, curated in one amazing hour of radio. This week, the science behind J.K. Rowling's unmasking, a guy who played Mr. Darcy at a Jane Austen Summer Camp, the Libertarian festival for Seasteaders, a new telescope technology that will send balloons into space, regular folks drive NASCAR cars, and a musician who writes songs based on the New York Times column, "Modern Love."

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content of the week, wrapped up in one audio-licious program. This week, author Chuck Klosterman defines villainy, the Cronut craze catches a Harvard researcher's eye, head transplants are given an examination, robots roll into vinyards, and a pair of hard-partying vegetarians share their take on potato salad (spoiler alert: it's got Doritos in it!)

sarahelizamoody via Flickr Creative Commons

Our sunniest content of the week, all in one smart and snazzy hour. This week, misogyny online, the return of legal internet poker, an app that proves you're on a public beach, surprising summer reads, and a photographer's documentation of vanishing highway rest stops.

via Buzzfeed

There's a great piece on Buzzfeed today about how one of our favorite shows, This American Life, was created and has lasted for 500 episodes. One graphic in the story got our attention...the list of proposed names for the program. Check it out:

I don't know...I might have gone with "Ira Glass and His Radio Cowboys."

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content of the week, neatly packaged for your audio pleasure. On this show, the secret science behind sports fan-dom, dogs audition for a starring role in a New Hampshire play, Cryonics is (maybe) reborn, New Hampshire prospectors pan for gold, and Baz Lurhmann talks about a new album of 20's-style jazz covers of songs by Beyonce, Jay-Z, Alicia Keys, and other pop stars.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content from Word of Mouth's weekday show...all wrapped up in one gratifying and glam program.

This week: The emerging forum for high school confessions on Facebook; a sunny picture for the relationship success of online daters; a documentary looks at the life of experiential journalist George Plimpton; Dr. Who's potential recast as a woman; and Glam Rock...it matters more than you know.

amysimmer via Flickr Creative Commons

The huge breakthrough in math that came from the brain of a relative unknown in mathematics got us thinking about the way math genius has been portrayed in pop culture.

It didn't take a genius to come up with this prime number...our top five moments in math...in movies.

5. Little Man Tate upstages the "mathemagician," proving that a child prodigy can, sadly, be over the genius hill.

Alex Giron via Flickr Creative Commons

Our favorite content, all in one spit-polished piece of ear candy. 

This week, a program pairs juvenile delinquents with Russian literature, a musician asking NYC commuters what inspires them, a play about traumatic brain injury, Pulitzer Prize winning author Elizabeth, and the healing power of a special horse named Chester.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Our freshest and tastiest content, wrapped up in one zesty hour of radio. This week, "A New View."

A political scientist believes that Jane Austen may have been a master of Game Theory. And the surprising, twisted artistry and uses of Victorian-era walking canes.

and...

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

In this special edition of Word of Mouth: Girl Power Interrupted.

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

In this special edition of Word of Mouth: are we catching up with technology? This week we'll explore the very human way we interact with technology; resistance is futile.

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

“Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.”

-Fyodor Dostoyevsky  from Crime and Punishment

In this fearless edition of Word of Mouth, we take new steps and utter new words about crime, punishment and everything in between.

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

Behold! This week's Saturday show focuses on a bevy of our favorite segments that investigate "Art in the Real World."

Hello Community Advisory Board Members,

I am really looking forward to our discussion on April 27, and hearing feedback about NHPR's Word of Mouth. In preparation for our discussion I would love to have you listen to a few short pieces of sound and then share your impressions in a very brief survey (link below).

Thank you so much, and I look forward to meeting you all.

Rebecca Lavoie

Senior Producer, Word of Mouth

Question 1

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

We bring you a collection of tasty segments we know you'll love, using the powers of public radio telepathy. 

Alex Mallis via kickstarter.com

Just about everybody who’s ever shopped at the grocery store has instinctively checked produce for bruising or blemishes, or put aside a can of soup because the can was dented… but there are many people willing to eat for free what paying customers will not – even if they have to dig through a dumpster to find it. New Hampshire native Alex Mallis is head of Analect Films – and the director of the short documentary Spoils: Extraordinary Harvest. The film follows a diverse group of so-called ‘dumpster-divers’ on their late night journey to a New York City Trader Joes. You can catch Spoils this Saturday at 11 am at the Colonial Theater as part of the Monadnock Film Festival - and Alex joins us to explain the philosophy and logistics behind reclaiming discarded food from the dumpster.

via indiebound.org

Alex Kudera published Fight for Your Long Day, in 2010, but it’s still gaining traction because of its unflinching look at the swelling academic underclass that is adjunct faculty, recently getting notice from the chronicle of higher education. We spoke with him about the book and the perception of adjuncts in higher education today.

A&E

The reality television industry could be in for a rude awakening – a lawsuit filed last year by David Hester could threaten to change the foundations of the immensely popular genre. Still functioning after its explosive success near the turn of the century, reality TV has begun to face declining ratings in many of its shows. Last December, Hester filed a lawsuit against A&E after producers of “Storage Wars” allegedly rigged the outcome of the show’s competitors – with damaging results. Eriq Gardner is senior editor for the Hollywood Reporter and joins us to discuss the suit.

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