David Folkenflik | New Hampshire Public Radio

David Folkenflik

President Trump's pick to lead the U.S. Agency for Global Media, Michael Pack, showed up to work Wednesday for the first time after being approved by the U.S. Senate two weeks earlier.

His words to staff were affirming. His actions were anything but.

The Los Angeles Times' top editor is scrambling to placate journalists of color after years of often-unfulfilled promises by the paper to make grand progress in the diversity of the newsroom's ranks.

Some journalists have used terms such as "internal uprising" to describe their anger over racial inequity at the paper. Scores have participated in intense internal debates over the LA Times' coverage of recent protests and hiring practices, to the point that senior editors have weighed in, promising to listen and learn.

The fight over racial justice that has sparked protests across the country is also upending some of the country's leading newsrooms.

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There was news this afternoon of a major shakeup at the New York Times. The newspaper announced that James Bennet has resigned as the editorial page editor. His deputy is being given a different role in the newsroom.

The federal agency that regulates the U.S. television industry slapped the largest civil fine in its history on Sinclair Broadcast Group — a company with links to the Trump administration — as punishment for deceiving the government.

Sinclair agreed to the $48 million fine and entered into a consent decree to close three separate ongoing investigations by the Federal Communications Commission.

Updated at 4:41 p.m. ET

Fox News personalities have been cheerleading protesters across the U.S. gathering in defiance of state lockdown orders. This week, the situation became so extreme that a top executive at the network tried to rein in his stars.

Michael Bloomberg's short-lived presidential bid reignited a long-simmering dispute over the widespread use of nondisclosure agreements at American corporations — especially at his own.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci is one of the president's top advisers on how to tackle the coronavirus spread, so it's hard to imagine he has many free moments in his day. Yet he is spending a lot of time giving interviews.

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President Trump's reelection campaign has sued The Washington Post claiming defamation in two opinion pieces published last June.

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All right. Chris Matthews is stepping down as anchor of MSNBC's "Hardball." The longtime host resigned abruptly tonight after mounting criticism over embarrassing on-air moments. Here to tell us more is NPR's David Folkenflik.

Hey, David.

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He is one of the biggest names in conservative American talk radio, and yesterday, the influential and at times controversial host Rush Limbaugh shared some health news with his millions of listeners.

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Is it your turn to make the guacamole at the Super Bowl party this year?

If so, be careful. You don't want to join the thousands of people who've ended up in an emergency room for avocado-related injuries.

"These injuries are exceedingly common," says Dr. Matt Aizpuru of the Mayo Clinic.

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With the Iowa caucuses about to start tomorrow, we're getting a surprise twist, kind of like a dinner guest who never shows. The Iowa poll, which is published by The Des Moines Register and highly anticipated as a measure of the race, was supposed to be released last night. CNN was even planning a prime-time special. But with just minutes to go, it was scrapped. The people running the poll say a surveyor polling at least one voter skipped a candidate's name.

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The Houston Astros have had a season to remember: 107 regular season wins against just 55 losses. The Astros are heavy favorites to win their second World Series in three years. The series starts Tuesday evening.

Yet a celebratory rant by a senior executive after they clinched the pennant over the weekend has shifted attention to unwelcome subjects off the field, including domestic violence and the team's handling of female reporters.

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Shepard Smith was one of the few voices on Fox News that had been willing to challenge President Trump. Today the 55-year-old chief anchor at Fox abruptly resigned, saying it had been an honor and a privilege to report the news without fear or favor.

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NPR has a new CEO. John Lansing, a veteran government broadcast and cable television executive, has been selected by NPR's corporate board to succeed its current chief, Jarl Mohn.

Earlier this month, Jeffrey Epstein killed himself, authorities say, in federal prison as he faced criminal charges alleging sex trafficking of underage girls.

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All right. In recent months, the press has been digging into news about the late Jeffrey Epstein - his powerful friends and the allegations that he sexually exploited dozens of underage girls. For years, the media had paid only intermittent attention to the Epstein story until an investigative series last year in the Miami Herald. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik's story might help explain why. It includes an early-morning visit, a bullet and a dead cat.

NPR's newsroom is eliminating some jobs as part of a restructuring effort that adds positions in other areas to "more fully lean into our role as a public service organization," NPR's chief news executive announced Tuesday.

Senior Vice President of News and Editorial Director Nancy Barnes said the cuts would affect fewer than 10 people.

"The changes are not about saving money," Barnes wrote in a note to NPR staff. She called the moves a "realignment," designed to place greater coverage areas and move resources "where they will have the most impact."

Sports Illustrated has been sold for the second time in less than two years. This time, however, the $110 million purchase by Authentic Brands Group places far more importance on the iconic magazine's reputation than the publication itself — pushing the name further into such ventures as gambling and live events.

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