Austin Horn | New Hampshire Public Radio

Austin Horn

Austin Horn is a 2019-2020 Kroc Fellow. He joined NPR after internships at the San Antonio Express-News and Frankfort State-Journal, as well as a couple stints in the service industry. He aims to keep his reporting grounded in the experience of real individuals of all stripes.

He graduated from Columbia University in 2019 with a degree in American Studies. You can find him tweeting about basketball, music or his home state of Kentucky at @_AustinHorn.

The Kentucky Derby will take place in the fall with spectators, racing venue Churchill Downs announced on Thursday.

The most famous horse racing event in the world, usually held in May, will now take place from Sept. 1 to Sept. 5. The Kentucky Derby will be on Sep. 5, and the Kentucky Oaks — a race for 3-year-old fillies — will run a day earlier.

The 2020 New York City Marathon has been canceled, organizers announced on Wednesday.

The decision to shutter the race, which is the world's largest marathon and one of the city's marquee events, was due to "coronavirus-related health and safety concerns," according to a statement from the organizer, New York Road Runners.

Novak Djokovic, the world's No. 1-ranked men's tennis player, has tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Serbian tennis star released a statement on his diagnosis, saying that he and his wife have both contracted the virus after he organized a series of exhibition matches in southeastern Europe.

The events, called the Adria Tour, have been widely criticized for not maintaining significant social distancing protocols.

Political rivals and former governors of California Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis found some common ground

Delta Air Lines said on Monday that it would resume passenger flights between the U.S. and China this week. The company said it's the first U.S. airline to do so since February after flights were suspended as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic reached a new one-day high Thursday with 150,000 new confirmed cases, according to the World Health Organization.

Almost half of those cases were reported in the Americas, WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press conference.

"The world is in a new and dangerous phase," Tedros said. "Many people are understandably fed up with being at home. Countries are understandably eager to open up their societies and economies, but the virus is still spreading fast. It is still deadly, and most people are still susceptible."

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that the city will officially observe Juneteenth as a city and school holiday starting next year.

"Every city worker, every student, will have an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of our history and the truth, and to think about the work that we have to do ahead," de Blasio said Friday.

While it's still unclear when, if ever, Major League Baseball will play a 2020 season, a new recommendation from Dr. Anthony Fauci may have the league consider an earlier ending.

Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview with The Los Angeles Times that he would recommend the league finish its postseason before October.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday that the U.S. Open tennis tournament will take place as scheduled this summer in Queens.

The event will begin on Aug. 31 without fans in the stands because of the continued spread of the coronavirus.

Some tennis stars expressed unease at the announcement. Australian tennis star Nicholas Kyrgios called the move "selfish" on Twitter and joked that he would bring his hazmat suit. Australia has lost 102 people to the coronavirus, a tiny fraction of the more than 116,000 who have died in the United States from COVID-19.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has put a temporary pause on all further reopening efforts in the state after it saw the most new cases of the coronavirus in a single day since the start of the pandemic.

The Tokyo Olympic Games, which have been delayed a year to 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic, may be held in a simpler fashion than the Olympics usually are.

Yoshiro Mori, the president of the organizing committee, told reporters Wednesday that he hopes to simplify the games in order to cut costs and provide a safer environment, according to Japan's NHK News.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that the "number of new [coronavirus] cases walking in the door is at an all-time low."

Cuomo said that the number of new coronavirus hospitalizations reported on June 1 was 154, which is the lowest number since the state started counting in mid-March.

New York has been the state hit hardest in the U.S. by the coronavirus.

New York City's five boroughs have seen more than 200,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, according to the dashboard from John's Hopkins University.

For the first time in 30 years, police in Hong Kong have denied permission for organizers to hold an annual vigil for victims of the Tiananmen Square massacre. Police have cited concerns over the spread of the coronavirus.

The 124th annual Boston Marathon has been canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic. The Boston Athletic Association announced the move in a statement on Thursday, saying that the marathon will instead be held as a virtual event.

All participants who were set to run in the event initially slated for April 20 and later pushed back to Sept. 14 will be offered a full refund of their entry fee and have the opportunity to participate in the alternative.

New data released by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union shows that among the grocery store workers it represents, 10,000 have been infected by or are known to have been exposed to coronavirus and 68 have died from it. At least 3,257 have been infected with the virus, the union estimated on Friday.

Updated at 5:16 p.m. ET

Texas is moving forward with further reopening plans Monday but will delay the execution of those plans in the state's northern panhandle in light of its relatively high rate of confirmed coronavirus cases near Amarillo. Amarillo alone had more than 700 new cases on Friday.

There's a new drink on the menu at the Twisted Citrus, and it matches some new drapery.

The Rubber Duckie Mimosa, a concoction of champagne and blue rasberry lemonade with a classic yellow rubber duck floating on top, was inspired by the North Canton, Ohio breakfast joint's method of protecting its patrons from the spread of COVID-19: shower curtains.

In mid-March, when the unproven idea of giving coronavirus patients anti-malarial drugs emerged on social media and on Fox News, the online pharmacy HealthWarehouse said orders for hydroxychloroquine started to spike.

After three consecutive days with no new coronavirus cases reported, New Zealand allowed most businesses to reopen on Thursday.

The island country, which is home to nearly 5 million people, has been praised for its swift response to the spread of the coronavirus. New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has even said that the country has "won [the] battle" of widespread COVID-19 community transmission.

The Chinese city of Wuhan will begin what it is calling "10 days of mass battle" to test all 11 million residents after the discovery of a new cluster of coronavirus cases, NPR's Emily Feng reported.

Each of the city's districts will be required to create a testing plan by Tuesday, according Reuters, which first reported the initiative.

The United Nations is calling on members to contribute more to a global plan to fight the effects of coronavirus in "fragile countries."

As part of its Global Humanitarian Response Plan, the U.N. is requesting $6.7 billion in aid — more than tripling the $2 billion it requested in late March. Most of the countries that would receive the aid are located in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America. In total, the aid would reach 63 countries.

Three family members — a woman, her husband and her adult son — were charged Monday in the fatal shooting of a security guard at a Family Dollar store in Flint, Mich.

According to Genesee County prosecutor David Leyton, the security guard, 43-year-old Calvin Munerlyn, was shot shortly after telling the woman that her daughter could not enter the store because she wasn't wearing a mask.

Under state executive order, all customers and employees in stores are required to wear masks as a precaution against the coronavirus.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a ban on all assault-style firearms Friday.

The ban includes "1,500 models and variants," including the popular AR-15 rifle. It will prohibit those firearms, as well as some components, from being used, sold or imported.

Prospective drivers in Georgia don't have to stress about the road test and the examiner with the clipboard deciding whether to approve a license.

Earlier this week, Gov. Brian Kemp's office issued an executive order allowing for many prospective license holders to upgrade their learner's permits into licenses without taking an in-person road test. The order was filed because the state had suspended road tests in March amid concerns about the spread of COVID-19.

More than 1 million people around the world have recovered from COVID-19, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

Around 154,000 people in the United States have recovered from the deadly virus.

In a move that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo called "unprecedented," the New York City subway system will begin halting service every night from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. so that trains can be disinfected.

Cuomo announced the decision on Thursday, saying the new policy was needed to help keep essential workers who rely on the city's subway system safe from the coronavirus. The effort will begin on Wednesday, May 6.

"It is a massive undertaking that we have never done before," Cuomo said.

The official number of people in the United States killed by COVID-19 has reached 50,000, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The U.S. death and confirmed cases totals are far higher than any other country's.

More than 190,000 people have died from the coronavirus globally, and case totals have reached over 2.7 million, as of Friday afternoon.

With few to no sporting events taking place because of the coronavirus crisis, sports journalism is feeling the crunch.

Vox Media announced Friday that it would furlough around 9% of its workforce for three months starting on May 1, according to a staff email from CEO Jim Bankoff obtained by NPR. Several of those furloughs are hitting the media group's flagship sports website SB Nation.