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0000017a-15d9-d736-a57f-17ff8f4d0000NHPR’s ongoing coverage of water contamination at the former Pease Air Force Base and in the communities surrounding the Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics plant in Merrimack. We’ll keep you updated on day to day developments, and ask bigger questions, such as:What do scientists know about the health effects of perfluorochemicals like PFOA, PFOS and PFHxS?How are policy makers in New Hampshire responding to these water contaminants?How are scientists and policymakers communicating potential risks?How are other states responding to similar contaminations?

State Offers Blood Test For 100 People Exposed To Contaminant At Pease Tradeport

The Department of Health and Human Services is offering a free blood test to people who may have drunk contaminated water at the Pease Tradeport in Portsmouth last year.

Perfluorochemicals, or PFCs, are used in products that resist heat – like Teflon, and the foam once used for fighting fires at Pease Airforce Base. PFCs were found in a well at the Pease Tradeport in May 2014.

Now the state is responding to public concerns by offering a blood test to determine people's level of exposure. But as Public Health Director José Montero points out, there is not good data on the long-term impacts of PFC exposure.

"And it’s one of those unhappy places where we want to test for something that we can’t advise a change, a course of action, or a treatment for somebody," says Montero.

Montero says the state will offer blood tests to 100 people for starters, including 50 children. Officials are advising individuals who would like to participate to call 603-271-9461.

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