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Will Saturday's Election Change Anything In Nigeria?

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (left), and APC main opposition party's presidential candidate Mohammadu Buhari shake hands under the eyes of Chairman of the Abuja Peace Accord former Head of State General Abdulsalami Abubakar (center), after signing the renewal of the pledges for peaceful elections on March 26, 2015 in Abuja. Security is a major concern at Saturday's vote both from Boko Haram violence against voters and polling stations to clashes between rival supporters. In 2011, around 1,000 people were killed in violence after Jonathan beat Buhari to the presidency. (Philip Ojisua/AFP/Getty Images)
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (left), and APC main opposition party's presidential candidate Mohammadu Buhari shake hands under the eyes of Chairman of the Abuja Peace Accord former Head of State General Abdulsalami Abubakar (center), after signing the renewal of the pledges for peaceful elections on March 26, 2015 in Abuja. Security is a major concern at Saturday's vote both from Boko Haram violence against voters and polling stations to clashes between rival supporters. In 2011, around 1,000 people were killed in violence after Jonathan beat Buhari to the presidency. (Philip Ojisua/AFP/Getty Images)

For the first time in 16 years, the opposition party in Nigeria has enough support that it could win in national elections. But would the president allow for a peaceful handover of power?

Election monitor Darren Kew says the answer to that question could determine whether this is the beginning of a new era for democracy in Nigeria, or the beginning of devastating internal strife. He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Guest

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