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What The 'Blurred Lines' Verdict Means For The Music Industry

Musicians Robin Thicke (left) and Pharrell Williams perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for BET)
Musicians Robin Thicke (left) and Pharrell Williams perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for BET)

On Tuesday, a California federal jury delivered its verdict after eight days of trial testimony examining whether Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams’ song “Blurred Lines” infringed on the copyright for Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up.”

The Gaye estate walked away with a victory and Thicke and Williams were ordered to pay more than $7 million in damages, plus profits attributable to infringement. It is a sad day for the “Blurred Lines” duo, but what could the ruling mean for the music industry?

For a closer look at this, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke with Mark Goldstein, former senior vice-president of business and legal affairs at Warner Bros. Records, who is now a professor of practice at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music.

[Youtube]

[Youtube]

Guest

  • Mark Goldstein, former senior vice-president of business and legal affairs at Warner Bros. Records. He’s now a professor of practice at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music.

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