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Will The 'Torture Report' End The Torture Debate?

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is pursued by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she arrives to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks.  (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)
Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. is pursued by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she arrives to release a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

The long-awaited Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA’s use of “harsh” or “enhanced” interrogation was released today.

The CIA turned to those methods to question al-Qaida suspects after the 9/11 terror attacks. President Obama called it torture and banned U.S. intelligence agencies from engaging in it.

Proponents of the methods, including former heads of the CIA and top members of the Bush administration insist that those interrogations yielded crucial information, including information that eventually led the U.S. to Osama bin Laden.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Diane Feinstein has previously said that this report found that harsh treatment was not a “central” part of finding bin Laden.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young asks MIT security expert Jim Walsh about what’s new in the report and if it will resolve the debate over torture.

Guest

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