Ask Sam | New Hampshire Public Radio

Ask Sam

Ask Sam features Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown answering listener questions about the mysteries and quirks of the natural world.

Do you have a question you want Sam to answer on NHPR's Morning Edition? Call the Outside/In hotline at 1-844-GO-OTTER or email a voice memo to outsidein@nhpr.org.

Are snow-making machines an example of climate adaptation, or an example of an emissions feedback loop? Does the fire risk posed by planting trees outweigh the benefits of their use as a carbon sink? Can the team talk big planet problems and still leave room for bad puns?

We’ll answer these questions and more climate queries on this special edition of Ask Sam.

https://flic.kr/p/5Dr6fa / Flicker CC

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | DaPuglet

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Sherry From Meredith asks: “I’m noticing a lot of chipmunks this year, as my son Josiah put it. Are we having a Chip-ocalypse? Like we had Squirrel-mageddon a couple of years ago?”

 

Wikimedia Commons

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Flickr Creative Commons | Nicholas A. Tonelli

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In Host Sam Evans-Brown answers listeners' questions about the mysteries and quirks of the outside world.

Laurie from California asks: “In all of the five big extinction events, how did plants fare versus animals? Are trees going to take over after we’re gone? Are trees with flowers still going to be around?”

Flickr Creative Commons | Brian Gratwicke

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Susanne from Rumney asks: "I’ve been going for a walk every morning since we’ve been quarantined. So, I’ve noticed lately that I’ve heard a lot of woodpeckers in the morning and I haven’t noticed them before. And I wondered if there are more of them or if this is the time of year that they are seeking wood from the trees?"

 

Flickr Creative Commons | USFWS Mountain-Prairie

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Cindy from Chichester asks: "Every year I have a skunk that comes around and makes divots all over my yard looking for grubs. The question is this: Do they actually know that there is a grub in the place that they dig, or do they just randomly dig holes until they find something? I have not been able to get an answer to this question, so it’s your turn." 

Challenge accepted, Cindy.

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Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Claudia Asks: “What is the difference between a turtle and a tortoise? Which do we have in New Hampshire? Could you give some examples of each please?”

This is one of the classic turtle questions, and as such we’re going to knock it out of the park quickly and pivot to some #turtlefacts.

Flickr Creative Commons | C Watts

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Sara in New Orleans asks: “I’m calling because every time I think I’m very good at recognizing shore birds, I get mixed up by the fact that some of their bills change color during the different seasons, and I’m just so confused by how this happens and how long it takes for it to happen.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Rod Haley

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Right now, many New Hampshirites are home, giving us a unique opportunity to question the nature invading our personal spaces.

Click here for all of NHPR's coronavirus coverage, including the latest news, FAQs, and more.

Flickr Creative Commons | William A. LaCrosse III

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Gary from Randolph asks: "I was curious as to whether Lyme disease affects wildlife. Do fox, moose, bear and other critters suffer from Lyme disease?"

You may have heard that dogs can get Lyme disease. You may have also heard that cats don’t. What gives? 

Wikimedia Commons

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Clair from Plymouth asks: “Why do cows have four teats and just about every other animal that doesn’t have litter has two?

This has been a topic of scientific inquiry going back all the way to Aristotle who first posited the idea that in mammals, the number of teats is — as a rule — double the number of offspring in the average litter.

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Sarah from South Carolina Asks: “My husband and I were discussing the very interesting topic of dog toots. So we were curious as to whether or not all animals can pass gas?”

This is how it ends. We all start out doing important journalism — holding the powerful to account — but you keep at it long enough and it all devolves into flatulence. 

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Bob From Deerfield Asks: This might be a dead end, silly question, but: are there any animals besides humans that enjoy music, and if so what genre do they prefer?

*Gasp* There are no dead end silly questions on Ask Sam! Perish the thought!

Flickr Creative Commons | Bryce Bradford

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Ruth from Sandwich asks: “I just was skating on beautiful Squam Lake with black ice, and we could look down and see some other stuff. I was wondering if you could talk about ice forms, why there’s cracks, why there’s little ridges, why there’s bubbles… all that stuff.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Denis Fournier

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | Charlie Stinchcomb

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Myles from Alaska asks: When we go underwater, everything looks kind of weird and marbly. When whales are out of the water, what does it look like for them? Does it look weird because they’re not used to being in the air?

Mount Washington Auto Road

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

 

David from Denver, Colorado asks: I studied geology ... and we learned extensively about the long and complex geological of the New England region. And I can’t help but wonder what was the maximum elevation achieved in New Hampshire and New England generally?

Note: This edition of Ask Sam originally aired in November, 2018.

Katmai National Park and Preserve

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Jahleah asks: I have two questions for you. Number one: How do bears hibernate in New Hampshire? Number two: do they even need to hibernate since there’s trash everywhere?

Flickr Creative Commons | Tracey

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. 

Panther from New Hampshire asks: "I was wondering if milkweed was related to cotton, and if it’s ever been used for material like clothing?"

First of all, I’m not sure if Panther is a nom de plume, nom de guerre or just a regular old nom, but what a name, sir!

Photo by Jonathan Combe, https://bit.ly/2BhLrRu

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. This week, we're buzzing because...

...Patty from Northampton asks: "I should understand the tides but I really don't. So in North Hampton, we have a very small beach even at low tide. And I was recently at Ogunquit beach with a friend, and the tide goes the way the heck out at low tide. And I don't know why!"

Flickr Creative Commons | Ian Jacobs

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown tackles a question from a listener. This week, we're buzzing, because...

...Carolyn from Maine asks: “This summer there’s been a lot of attention paid to diseases like EEE, which can be transmitted from a bite from an infected mosquito. But my question is, during the middle of the day when these species of mosquito are less likely to be feeding, what are they doing instead? Which made me wonder if mosquitoes sleep?”

Flickr Creative Commons | Judy Gallagher

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Alex Wild | alexanderwild.com

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Flickr Creative Commons | ajari

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown answers a question from a listener about some quirk of the world around us.

(Do you have a question for Sam? Submit it here!)  

Flickr Creative Commons | dotun55

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Rich from Hudson, NH asks: “I’ve noticed that last summer I noticed an awful lot of dragonflies in my neighborhood. And they were beautiful and they were much larger. I really liked it, and I wonder if this has something to do with the global warming that we’re experiencing?”

Flickr Creative Commons | namar_us

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Brian from Hopedale, MA asks: “I was wondering why when you’re driving, why do birds always swoop in front of your car when they could easily just swoop above the road and above the cars? It’s something I’ve never understood.”

This will come off as kinda harsh on Brian, (sorry, Brian) but what we’ve got here is a fundamental misunderstanding of who’s swooping in on who.

Flickr Creative Commons | Jan Kaláb

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

This week, he's tackling a gritty one from a listener named Laura from Stratham:

Flickr Creative Commons | chadnorthrup

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.” Do you have a question you want Sam to tackle? Click here to submit it!

Virginia from Manchester asks: I was wondering if we are having an abnormally high amount of pollen this season. And if we are having a worse pollen season than usual, I was wondering what the reason might be?

Flickr Creative Commons | Jose M. Rus

Every other Friday on Morning Edition, Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown answers a question from a listener about some quirk of the world around us.

(Do you have a question for Sam? Submit it here!)  

This week, Jeff from Northwood asks: “What makes laundry smell nice and fresh when you hang it out to dry?”

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