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utilities

A hand dispenses covid 19 vaccination into a syringe.
Todd Bookman; NHPR

A continuación,  lee las noticias del miércoles 24 de marzo.  También puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ves algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Un año después del primer fallecimiento por COVID-19, se cuentan 1,200 muertes por el virus en New Hampshire

Community Power New Hampshire

A bill that would transform municipalities’ control of their energy sources will now move forward, after advocates and legislators found agreement on key elements.

The House Science, Technology and Energy committee voted unanimously on Monday morning to recommend that the full House pass an amended version of the community power bill.  

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

A continuación, lee las noticias del lunes 1 de marzo.

También puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ves algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Aumentan vacunas y se reducen lentamente los casos de COVID y hospitalizaciones en New Hampshire

flickr

A continuación, lee las noticias del 17 de febrero. También puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio. 

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Promedio de casos diarios, y hospitalizaciones, de COVID-19 se reducen en New Hampshire 

Los números alrededor del COVID-19 en New Hampshire se están moviendo en direcciones positivas. 

Community Power New Hampshire

State lawmakers heard testimony Friday on a controversial bill that would change how community power programs could operate in the state.  

NWS Gray

A continuación, están las noticias del martes 4 de agosto.

Puedes escucharlas hacienda click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes. 

Funcionarios reportan 26 casos nuevos de COVID-19 identificados el lunes

Los funcionarios de salud anunciaron 26 [veintiséis] nuevos casos positivos de COVID-19 el lunes y ningún fallecimiento adicional. 

Joe Shlabotnik/flickr

Te invitamos a leer las noticias de New Hampshire del viernes 31  de julio y una conversación con Ray Burke, abogado en New Hampshire Legal Aid, quién nos contó qué pueden hacer las personas con pagos  pendientes de servicios públicos.

También puedes escuchar el noticiero en el siguiente audio. La entrevista empieza en el minuto 3:18. 

Una nota: el texto a continuación es nuestro guion de grabación, por lo que notarás anotaciones diferentes. 

NH Electric Coop Facebook

New Hampshire state regulators have agreed to hold a virtual public hearing next week on plans to resume utility service disconnections.

The state recently ended its pandemic-related moratorium on shutoffs for overdue payments. Now, the Public Utilities Commission is deciding how utilities should resume the shutoffs, as well as late payment fees.

File Photo, NHPR

The New Hampshire Electric Cooperative will get $2.8 million in disaster funds to cover damage to its infrastructure from the Halloween storm of 2017.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says the grant will cover more than three-quarters of the Co-op's repair costs. FEMA says it's given New Hampshire more than $7.2 million dollars total under a federal disaster declaration for the storm which caused widespread flooding, infrastructure damage and power outages at the end of October 2017.

Courtesy IBEW

A strike at the New Hampshire Electric Cooperative is over after members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers voted to ratify a new contract. 

The company reached the three-and-a-half year agreement with its 83 union workers Thursday, more than a week after they walked off the job.

They were picketing for more control of their pensions than the co-op initially wanted to give. In a statement, the union says the contract they agreed to addresses those concerns.

The strike was the first for the IBEW in New Hampshire and Maine in at least 30 years.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The legislature is debating whether utilities should tell customers how much of their electric bills go toward renewable energy. 

Monthly energy bills already show how much each customer pays for things like transmission. Now, Rep. Michael Harrington is proposing adding a line, showing the cost per ratepayer of the Renewable Portfolio Standard, or RPS.

Dave Dugdale via Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/7kCZi1

Solar energy is big business in New Hampshire right now. Enough projects have submitted at least preliminary applications to add up to more than a 400 percent increase from 2014.

Now that forecasters expect Hurricane Joaquin to pass well east of the state, New Hampshire utilities are holding off on deploying emergency work crews.

Alec O’Meara of Unitil says the company has been planning for the storm since Monday. He says, given that a large amount of the eastern seaboard was believed to be in Joaquin’s path, power companies were "really trying to figure out exactly where the best place for all those crews to be allocated. Thankfully it was more of an intellectual process, and it appears all will be spared - at least in the continental United States."

The nation’s largest solar energy contractor is expanding in New Hampshire. But officials with California-based SolarCity say solar’s future here would be brighter if the state lifts a cap on its net metering program.

SolarCity , whose principal investor is tech billionaire Elon Musk, put up 40 percent of the residential solar panels in the country last year, and has been doing business in southern NH since April.

New Prospects For Solar Energy In N.H.

May 4, 2015
h080 / Flickr/cc

With the recent announcement that the country’s biggest solar company is coming to New Hampshire, some green energy advocates are hopeful for the industry’s prospects.  We’re looking at how Solar City’s arriving may affect the industry’s prospects here given that today, sun-power represents a tiny percentage of our overall energy mix.

File photo

New Hampshire Electric Cooperative and Liberty Utilities say customers will see their bills decrease, effective May 1.

The change is the result of a decrease in the power rate.

For co-op customers, it comes out to about $23.67 less per month for a residential member using 500 kilowatts per month. For a customer using 1,000 kilowatts per month, it's about $47.33.

At Liberty, the reduction will mean a $46 decrease per month for an average residential customer.

PSNH Anticipates Rate Hike For Customers

May 5, 2014

New Hampshire’s largest utility estimates customers will see a two percent average rate hike this year.  Public Service of New Hampshire filed its rate adjustment forecast with the Public Utilities Commission Friday.  PSNH says higher energy prices over the winter and continued volatility in the market could translate into higher power bills.  The utility has not yet requested a rate change from the PUC.

Snowstorm: Who's Reporting Power Outages?

Feb 24, 2013

Today's snowstorm is set to drop two to four inches across most of the state by tonight.  The Seacoast could see up to six inches.  While it's a slower-moving storm than Nemo two weeks ago, numerous power outages have been reported.  By 12:25 pm, these are the communities that have been impacted most.

PSNH: 2,747

After 18 months of federal and state review, Northeast Utilities has completed a $5-billion purchase of Boston-based NStar. The deal makes PSNH’s parent company the largest utility in New England.

During a conference call, CEO Tom May said the acquisition would help his company pursue the Northern Pass project.

"The new NU will, because of the financial strength of the combined companies, actually have credit rating upgrades, which should make it a lot easier to finance this project," said May.

A house bill that would consider giving the Public Utilities Commission authority to force PSNH to sell its power plants to open up market competition is getting vocal opposition from business leaders and mayors in the state.

Berlin Mayor Paul Grenier says the move will raise electric rates and scare businesses away from his community.