moose | New Hampshire Public Radio

moose

Megan Tan

We're sharing a selection of stories from the show's early days, including an edition of Eat the Invaders and our earliest installments of our 10x10 series looking at vernal pools and traffic circles.

N.H.'s Most Beloved Animals

Sep 9, 2020
National Audubon Society

We check in on iconic New Hampshire wildlife. Following the death of Mink, the Upper Valley's infamous black bear, we recap her saga and what it demonstrates about human impacts on animals. Also, after a summer of heavy action on our lakes, we find out how loons are faring. And, we meet the state's new moose project leader and check in on the health of our moose population as they face warming winters. 

Air date: Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020. 

Dave Anderson

Expert wildlife tracker Susan Morse is A LOT of things:

A life-long naturalist…a Shakespearian scholar…an award winning photographer.

What she is not…is easy to get a hold of.  So with some persistence and a little luck, Something Wild's Dave Anderson and Chris Martin tracked Sue down a few weeks back, before her busy season kicked into high gear.

Which is right about now (late winter) as Sue leads dozens of programs across  New England and beyond—teaching everyday people about wildlife tracking and habitat monitoring techniques.

Photo by Will Staats/NHFG

We talk with wildlife biologist Kristine Rines.  For three decades, she worked with  New Hampshire Fish and Game as the moose project leader.  We discuss the changes she saw during her tenure, from the ravaging of the moose population due to winter ticks and the changes in the state's habitat and public attitudes.  As a biologist, she worked with many of NH's wild creatures known as charismatic megafauna such as bear and moose.

Air date: Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Brady Carlson

A $1,000 reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest of the person responsible for an illegal moose killing in the North Country.

According to New Hampshire Fish and Game, the incident happened on October 20th at Sugarloaf Pond in Stratford. The moose was shot once in the chest and then again at close range in the head. None of the animal was harvested.

An Uncertain Future for N.H. Moose

Oct 19, 2018
N.H. Fish and Game

We examine the plight of Northern New England Moose. Researchers in New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont have just concluded an extensive, multi-year study on these beloved mammals, and the results are alarming.  We'll dig into their findings and ask what the future might hold. 

Northeast Naturalist via Flickr CC

Researchers have finished their largest study to date on how ticks and warming winters are hurting moose in Northern New England.

The data shows unprecedented death rates among moose calves -- more than 50 percent in four of the past five years, plus lower reproductive rates in adult moose across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

State Parks

 

New Hampshire is adding a new letter to its popular moose license plates, after selling out of two past letter combinations. 

 

The state has issued nearly 50,000 of the special conservation plates in the past 20 years. 

 

Now, state natural and cultural resources commissioner Sarah Stewart says they need more letter combinations. 

 

"The letter C for conservation - that was the first letter, then we added H for heritage - and now this spring, we've added P for preservation to meet demand," she says.

 

file photo

Conservationists say two iconic New Hampshire animals – moose and loons – show how climate change will reshape the region in the years to come.

They talked about their latest research – and how they hope people will respond to it – at the Audubon Society in Concord Wednesday night.

It was the same day New Hampshire and Maine set new records for winter warmth. Highs were in the 70s in Concord, and the snowless Mount Washington summit reached 48.

Moose Hunt Lottery Opens in New Hampshire

Jan 29, 2018
USFWS David Govtaski

  The moose hunt lottery is now open in New Hampshire.

The 2018 applications must be postmarked or submitted online by midnight on May 25, or delivered to the licensing office at the Fish and Game Department headquarters in Concord before 4 p.m. that day.

Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing on June 15.

Bill via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2kFWk

One of New Hampshire's most sought-after animals is the moose - a giant mammal somehow able to straddle the line between majestic, and absurd-looking, with big blunt noses and comparatively spindly legs.

But beloved or not, moose aren't always easy to spot. This story from our Only in NH series sets out to answer questions submitted by listeners. This one is from Sean, who asks “Where is the best place to look for moose?”

Producer Taylor Quimby is on the case.

Scott Heron; Flickr

We couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

New Hampshire Fish & Game

Climate change, which causes rising temperatures, increasingly severe weather events, and shrinking habitats, negatively impacts the moose and loon populations of New Hampshire more than any other factors -- including human interference from road construction or hunting and fishing practices.

That's according to longtime wildlife observers, who joined The Exchange to deliver an update on these two beloved new Hampshire species. 

 

Samantha Fogel

New Hampshire Fish and Game hosted the 30th annual moose hunt lottery this morning. Names were selected from a computer generated system. 51 permits were issued to 6,850 applicants. The odds of getting one of these permits were 1 in 87 for residents of New Hampshire and 1 in 391 for out-of-state applicants.

Among the winners was Richard Tichko from Canterbury. 

"I feel pretty excited. My wife is up in Pittsburgh fly fishing. She said if she won, I had to call her. Well I'm going to call her and tell her I won."

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

  The New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission has approved 51 moose hunt lottery permits this year, the lowest number since the state started its current system in 1988.

Permits have declined in recent years, partly because of the impact of parasites, both winter tick and brainworm, on the moose population. Last year, 71 lottery permits were issued.

The proposal would need to be approved by the New Hampshire Joint Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

Last year's drought in New Hampshire was tough on farmers and towns. But it turns out to have been good for moose.

Preliminary numbers from a project that puts tracking collars on moose show that only one of the calves — the most vulnerable group — died from winter ticks this year. A year ago, nearly 75 percent of the calves tracked died.

Moose biologist Kristine Rines says many of the blood-sucking ticks died because they were deprived of moisture. But the ticks still have a long-term advantage, with shorter winters and moose density on their side.

The State of the State's Moose

Jan 23, 2017
NH Fish & Game

More than a North Country mascot, moose are an indicator of ecosystem health and climate change. With populations in New Hampshire decimated in recent years, a four-year, three-state study is collecting data on the health of the moose population and the devastation caused by winter ticks.  We discuss other threats to the moose population, such as brainworm, and how moose are managed in the state.

Something Wild: A Word with NH's Moose Biologist

Oct 14, 2016
Moose Munching
AL_HikesAZ / Flickr Creative Commons

Fall is a busy time for Kristine Rines's department, the moose are in rut (mating) and hunting season is open. She works for NH Fish and Game as the state’s first ever Moose Biologist. She received the distinguished “Moose Biologist of the Year” from her peers at the North American Moose Conference in 2006. Rines has announced her plans to retire after three decades on the job and sat down with Something Wild to reflect on her time studying the state’s moose.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is holding its annual moose hunt lottery.

The Fish and Game Department will issue 71 moose hunting permits on Friday. Winners are selected through a computerized random drawing.

Hunters who are drawn and accept a permit are not eligible to enter the lottery or apply for a bonus point for the following three years.

Last year, 105 permits were offered. New Hampshire has roughly 4,000 moose— about half the population from 10 years ago. The decline is due partly due to an increase in winter ticks.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

 

The deadline for entering New Hampshire's moose hunt lottery is May 27.

It costs $15 for residents and $25 for non-residents to enter the lottery. A total of 71 permits are proposed to be issued this year.

The state's moose hunt will run from Oct. 15-23.

Last year, the statewide hunter success rate was 69 percent.

Each applicant can enter once a year. A bonus point system improves the chances for unsuccessful applicants who apply each consecutive year.

New Hampshire Fish and Game officers are conducting a poaching investigation in Errol after they said a moose was found shot to death, with its antlers missing.

Officers responded to a tip on Sunday regarding the dead animal, found about three-fourths of a mile from the end of Smokey Camp Brook Road.

They said it was a mature bull moose, believed to have been shot on or around Friday. No meat was taken from the animal. Conservation officers were able to find some physical evidence at the scene.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

Early indications show some promise for a New Hampshire moose herd that has been wobbled by a troublesome parasite.

Kristine Rines, a wildlife biologist and the moose project leader for the state's Fish and Game Department, says it's still too early to say with certainty if the 2014-15 winter will be better than previous winters, but data so far shows fewer calf deaths and fewer winter ticks.

Among the animals tagged by state biologists, seven of 27 calves had died as of last week. That's a 26 percent mortality rate, compared to 64 percent last year.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Fish and Game is working on a new plan for how many deer, turkey, bear and moose hunters will be allowed to shoot between now and 2025. For moose-hunters in some parts of the state, that number may soon be zero.

Fish and Game is considering regional population thresholds, where if moose herd continues to decline it will call a moratorium on the moose hunt.

Dave Spier via Flickr CC

Biologists in New Hampshire and Maine are teaming up on a five-year study to better understand why moose populations are declining.

WMUR-TV reports that Maine's estimated population of 60,000 moose has fared better than New Hampshire's herd of about 4,000 but both states are seeing a decline, largely blamed on more winter ticks.

Lee Kantar of Maine's Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and Kristine Rines of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department are collaborating on the study.

North Country Moose Study Aided By Research 'Muggers'

Jan 28, 2015
northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

How's this for a typical day at the office: get into a helicopter, fly just above treetops in parts of northern New Hampshire, and find moose to tag, track and monitor. It's part of the work New Hampshire Fish and Game is doing to study the effect of winter tick and other parasites on the state's moose population.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's moose season has come to an end, with at least 91 hunters succeeding in bagging a moose during the nine-day period.

The Fish and Game Department says a total of 127 permits were issued, representing a statewide success rate of 72 percent. That's fewer permits than in recent years, due to a drop in the moose population.

   

The State Conservation Committee is taking applications for $285,000 in conservation grants made possible by sales of the state's "Moose Plate."

When drivers' register their vehicles, they can spend an extra $30 for the moose plate. All funds raised through the program go to promotion, protect and invest in New Hampshire's natural, historical and cultural resources.

Moose Munching
AL_HikesAZ / Flickr Creative Commons

The deadline is approaching to enter New Hampshire's moose permit lottery.       Entries are due Friday, May 30.    The state is offering permits to 124 winners for this year's moose hunt, which runs from Oct. 18-26.  Last year's statewide hunter success rate for moose was 64 percent.   Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing and announced on Friday, June 20.  To enter, visit http://www.huntnh.com to apply online or print out a mail-in application. Participants also can pick up a lottery application from any Fish and Game office or license agent.

State Begins Study On Moose Decline In N.H.

Feb 3, 2014
Northeast Naturalist via Flickr CC

New Hampshire Fish and Game will closely monitor 43 moose in the state to learn more about why their numbers keep decreasing.  

Brady Carlson

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials say they plan to reduce the number of moose hunting permits issued this year in response to the continued decline of the animal in some parts of the state.

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