Merrimack Station

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Nearly 70 people were arrested during a protest at a coal-fired power plant in Bow Saturday.

The activists had marched onto the grounds of Merrimack Station, the largest coal-burning facility left in New England that is not set to retire.

Hundreds more people from across the region protested outside the plant’s main gate and in nearby Memorial Field, decrying the continued use of the fossil fuels that accelerate the harmful effects of climate change.


Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The town of Bow has reached a settlement with Eversource to repay millions in excess taxes on a local power plant.

Merrimack Station in Bow is the largest coal-burning power plant left in New England. Until recently, it was owned by Eversource and made up the bulk of Bow's tax base.

The utility says Bow charged them too much in property tax for the plant in 2012 and 2013. Earlier this year, the New Hampshire Supreme Court agreed.

File Photo

Two environmental groups have filed suit against the owners of a coal-fired power plant outside Concord.

The Conservation Law Foundation complaint says Merrimack Station in Bow is polluting the Merrimack River with excess hot water.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Two environmental groups plan to sue the owners of a coal-fired power plant outside Concord – Merrimack Station, the largest of its kind left in New England.

The Sierra Club and the Conservation Law Foundation say they'll file suit under the Clean Water Act in January if things don't change at the power plant.

PSNH / Flickr Creative Commons

The state Supreme Court has ruled for Eversource in the company's fight with the town of Bow over the value of a local power plant.

The decision comes as the utility finishes selling off Merrimack Station as part of its deregulation process.

The plant and some related assets have made up a big part of Bow's tax rolls for decades.

File photo

Eversource announced it will sell its electricity generating stations in New Hampshire for nearly $260 million.

 

This comes after a 20-year process and 2015 agreement to deregulate the state's energy industry.

 

As NHPR's Sam Evans-Browns reports, Eversource's dams, hydro-facilities and fossil fuel plants will be owned by private companies - which will then sell the energy on the open market.

 

PSNH / Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission has agreed to put the brakes on a big decision regarding the state’s largest electric utility, Public Service of New Hampshire.

The first is how much it will be reimbursed for a scrubber on a power plant in Bow that saw more than hundred million dollars more than was initially estimated. And the second is whether they should be allowed to continue to own power-plants – period – or if instead independent, third-parties should be the only companies in the electricity generation market.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Public Service of New Hampshire wants to seek a settlement on two major proceedings currently before utility regulators.

The first decision facing the Public Utilities Commission is how much ratepayers should have to spend to reimburse the cost of a $422 million scrubber on its coal-fired power plant in Bow. The second is whether it’s in customers’ best interest to allow PSNH to keep its power plants, or if the utility should sell them.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

This winter’s cold weather has proven a boon to Public Service of New Hampshire and its customers. Spikes in the price of natural gas have lifted regional electric prices, making PSNH’s rates competitive again.

PSNH says during most of the winter it was able to more cheaply produce electricity using its fleet of power plants than buying it on the open market and this saved the company $115 million dollars, savings which will be passed on to customers.

Public Service of New Hampshire

The Environmental Protection Agency has released its 2010 data of the biggest greenhouse gas emitters in the state.

Power plants are at the top of the list.

The EPA collected data from nine different industries that emit greenhouse gases including power plants, pulp and paper mills, landfills and other industrial sources.

All told, they produced five-point nine million metric tons of greenhouse gases in New Hampshire.

About 40-percent of that comes from just one power plant, Merrimack Station in Bow.

It burns coal.